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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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rate ports, but of these we need not present a record. It is a notable circumstance that the arrivals from the Southern States are far more numerous than those from the North, with which our intercourse is free and unrestrained.--(Doc. 131.) At Fort Pulaski, Ga., this day, the following general order was issued by command of Major-Gen. David Hunter, U. S. A.: All persons of color lately held to involuntary service by enemies of the United States, in Fort Pulaski and on Cockspur Island, Ga., are hereby confiscated and declared free, in conformity with law, and shall hereafter receive the fruits of their own labor. Such of said persons of color as are able-bodied, and may be required, shall be employed in the Quartermaster's Department, at the rate heretofore established by Brig.-Gen. W. T. Sherman. Gen. Hunter also addressed to Mr. Pierce, the Treasury Agent in charge of the Sea Island plantations, a letter asking for the names of the former owners, and the number o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
f Charleston except Savannah, which was defended by Fort Pulaski, at the mouth of the Savannah River. This work is of brick, with five faces, casemated on all sides, and has a wet ditch. The walls are seven and a half feet thick, and rise twenty-five feet above high water, mounting one tier of guns in casemates and one en barbette. The gorge face is covered by a demi-lune of good relief, arranged for one tier of guns en barbette. This also has a wet ditch. The fort is situated on Cockspur Island, a marshy formation, surrounded by broad channels of deep water. The nearest approach to it on tolerably firm ground is from one to two miles distant, to the south-east, along a narrow strip of shifting sands formed on Tybee Island by the action of wind and waves. In the light of subsequent events it is of interest to recall the fact that before operations for investing the place were begun the fort was visited by several Confederate officers of rank, formerly of the regular army, who
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.1 (search)
Department of Kansas to the command of the Department of the South on the 31st of March, 1862, relieving Brigadier-General Thomas W. Sherman, and was himself relieved by General Quincy A. Gillmore on the 12th of June, 1863. Among the chief events of General Hunter's administration were the capture of Fort Pulaski, April 11th, 1862 (see General Gillmore's description of these operations, Vol. II., p. 1); the declaration of free-dom (April 12th, 1862) to slaves in Fort Pulaski and on Cockspur Island, Ga.; a similar declaration (May 9th) to slaves in Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina, which was annulled, ten days later by President Lincoln; and the enlistment of the first colored troops, called the 1st South Carolina regiment.--editors. confirmed me in the opinion that we would not have to wait long before another and more serious attack was made. A further reason for such a belief was the presence at that time of six Federal regiments on Folly Island, under Brigadier-General Israe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
e determined by this Convention; and that a copy of this resolution be ordered to be transmitted to the Governor of New York. The allusion above to the seizure of forts brings us to the consideration of the fact that Governor Brown, following the advice of the South Carolina conspirators, and the recommendations of Toombs and others, at Fort Pulaski. Washington, ordered the seizure of the coast defenses more than a fortnight before the Secession Convention met. Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, and Fort Jackson, nearer the city of Savannah, were seized on the 3d of January. The National Arsenal at the same city was taken possession of by insurgents on that day. On the 24th, the Arsenal at Augusta was seized by seven hundred State troops, in the presence of the Governor, and by his orders. The National troops in charge were allowed to salute their flag when they left, and were soon sent to New York. In the Arsenal were twenty-two thousand
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
illmore, his Chief Engineer, to reconnoiter Fort Pulaski and report upon the feasibility of a bombardment of it., Gillmore's reply was, that it might be reduced by batteries of rifled guns and mortars placed on Big Tybee Island, southeast of Cockspur Island, on which the fort stood, and across the narrower channel of the Savannah; and that aid might be given from a battery on Venus Point of Jones's Island, two miles from Cockspur, in the opposite direction. While waiting orders from Washingtond at night. and with a little battery on Bird Island, opposite (Battery Hamilton), effectually closed the Savannah River in the rear of Fort Pulaski. That fortress, as we have already observed, See page 179, volume I. was a strong one on Cockspur Island, which is wholly a marsh. Its walls, twenty-five feet in height above high water, presented five faces, and were casemated on all sides, and mounted one tier of guns in embrasures and one en barbette. The absolute blockade of Fort Pulask
Carolina and Georgia from their northern verge, after a generally south-east course of some 300 miles, passing, at the head of ship navigation, near its mouth, its namesake city, which is the commercial emporium of Georgia, winds its sluggish way to the Atlantic through a cluster of mud-formed, often sand-fringed sea islands, matted over with a thin crust of grass-roots, covering a jelly-like mud several feet deep, resting uneasily on a bed of light, semi-liquid clay. Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur island (a mile long by half as wide), was a carefully constructed brick National fortress 25 feet above ground by 7 1/2 thick, completely commanding not only the main channel of the Savannah, but all other inlets practicable for sea-going vessels to the city and the firm land above. Having early fallen an easy prey to the devotees of Secession, it was held by a garrison of 385 men, Col. C. C. H. Olmstead, 1st Georgia; its 40 heavy guns barring access to the river by our vessels, and affording
nd-hand. In order to understand the nature of the reconnoissance, it will be necessary to have a clear apprehension of the geography of the country. An ordinary map of the Savannah River will probably indicate but little more than the general course of the stream, and the situation of the principal city of Georgia. Savannah is about fifteen miles from the mouth of the river, and on the right or southern bank. Approach to it by water is defended by Fort Pulaski, a casemated fort on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the river, and Fort Jackson, a barbette fort on the mainland, only four miles below the city. The left bank is formed by a succession of islands, and the channel also is interrupted by large and numerous islands, the most important of which is Elba, whose upper extremity is immediately opposite Fort Jackson. Lower down in the stream is Long Island. The network of creeks and bays that surrounds Hilton Head terminates southward in Calibogue Sound, which is divided from
headquarters Department of the South, Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga., April 13, 1862. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of Wrn District, Department of the South, Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga., April 12, 1862. To Major-Gen. David Hunter, Commanig.-General Vols., Commanding U. S. Forces, Tybee and Cockspur Islands, Ga Report of Brigadier-General Viele. headqto the forces of the United States of Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga.: art. 1. The Fort, armament, and garrison td the eleventh day of April, 1862, at Fort Pulaski, Cockspur Island, Ga. Chas. H. Olmstead, Col First Vol Reg't of Ga., Coms allowed to cross the creek that separates Tybee from Cockspur Island. He was met at the shore and detained there. It seem of the Fort; the two mortar-batteries on the shore of Cockspur Island were silenced, and several of the casemate guns were sth the salt tides of the Savannah, the party landed on Cockspur Island. A long wooden causeway extends over the marsh perhap
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
ptured.—2. The emancipation and compensation resolution passed the United States Senate. Appalachicola, Fla., surrendered to Union troops.—4. Departments of the Shenandoah and Rappahannock created. Pass Christian, on the Gulf coast, taken by National troops.—8. National tax bill passed the House of Representatives.—11. Bill for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia passed the House of Representatives.—12. General Hunter declares all the slaves in Fort Pulaski and on Cockspur Island free. Engagement at Martinsburg, Va.—15. Confederates cut the levee on the Arkansas side of the Mississippi, near Fort Wright, causing an immense destruction of property.—16. President Lincoln signed the bill for the abolition of slavery in the District of Columbia. Battle of Lee's Mills, near Yorktown.—17. Skirmish on Edisto Island.—19. Battle of Camden, or South Mills, N. C.—21. Santa Fe evacuated by the Texans. Confederate Congress at Richmond broken up and dispers
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
ed with the Creeks, and finally resulted in the cession of all the Creek lands in Georgia to the United States. By this new treaty the Creeks retained all their lands in Alabama, which had been ceded by a former treaty. On the recommendation of Senator Toombs and others at Washington, in the winter of 1860-61, the governor of Georgia (Joseph Brown) ordered the seizure of the United States coast defences on the border of the State before the secession convention met. Fort Pulaski, on Cockspur Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, and Fort Jackson, near the city of Savannah, were seized on Jan. 3, 1861. On the same day the National arsenal at Savannah was taken possession of by Confederates, and 700 State troops, by the orders and in the presence of the governor, took possession of the arsenal at Augusta, Jan. 24, when the National troops there were sent to New York. In the arsenal were 22.000 muskets and rifles, some cannon, and a large amount of munitions of war. The forts
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