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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 7, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 6, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) or search for Cockspur Island (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
et above high water, mounting one tier of guns in casemates and one in barbette. The gorge face was covered by a demi-lune of good relief, arranged for one tier of guns in barbette, and was also provided with a ditch. The marshy formation, Cockspur island, on which Pulaski stood, was surrounded by broad channels of deep water, and the only near approach to it, on ground of tolerable firmness, was along a narrow strip of shifting sand on Tybee island. The people of Savannah, familiar with tnce; from the Savannah Guards, Capt. John Screven, and from the Oglethorpe Light Infantry, Capt. Francis S. Bartow, whose brilliant eloquence had been devoted to the cause of separation. This force, numbering 134 men, was carried by boat to Cockspur island on the morning of the 3d, and the occupation was effected without resistance from the few men in the works, who were allowed to continue in their quarters without duress. The militia under Colonel Lawton immediately hoisted a State flag—a r
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
ng vessels did not venture to attack Fort Pulaski, but landed a force of men on Tybee island on the 24th of November, after shelling the martello tower and battery, which had been abandoned some two weeks before. Captain Read, with a detachment of his command, crossed over to the island after dark to burn the hospital, but found the enemy too numerous. Learning that the Federals were gathering up the cotton and rice from the plantations, he burned some of these products and retired to Cockspur island. Commodore Tattnall's flotilla, the steamers Pocahontas, Seneca, Flag and Augusta, lay near Fort Pulaski, and as the enemy's gunboats kept well out of range, he endeavored by an attack and retreat to draw them closer. The naval skirmish continued for an hour, but was ineffective, and the Federals were too wary to give the fort an opportunity to participate. For several days afterward shells were thrown at long range toward Pulaski. During the stay of the Federal fleet at Tybee there
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
ing the port to commerce. During these operations on the Georgia coast, Phillips' Georgia legion had been on duty in Gen. T. F. Drayton's district, next north of Savannah, and was in action with the enemy on March 20th and 22d near Bluffton, S. C. On April 13th Maj.-Gen. David Hunter, in command of the department of the South, issued the following general order No. 7: All persons of color lately held to involuntary service by enemies of the United States in Fort Pulaski and on Cockspur island, Georgia, are hereby confiscated and declared free, in conformity with law, and shall hereafter receive the fruits of their own labor. Such of said persons of color as are able-bodied and may be required shall be employed in the quartermaster's department at the rates heretofore established by Brig.-Gen. T. W. Sherman. This conduct of Hunter accorded with his reputation elsewhere. His brutality was exceeded only by Butler. The above order was followed May 9th by the following: