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Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 88 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 27 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 25 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 18 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 18 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 16 0 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 14 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
the iron-clad defenses which might be constructed against us. We had rumors that an iron-clad floating battery was being built in Charleston, which the enemy proposed to anchor in some convenient position so as to breach Sumter at his leisure. We had no faith in the penetrating power of the eight-inch guns, and if we wished to demolish this floating adversary, it was necessary that the ten-inch guns should be mounted. Besides, an ironclad battery was well on the road to completion at Cumming's Point (twelve hundred yards from the weakest side of Sumter), which, from what we could see of it, would be impervious to any less powerful gun. There was in the fort a large coil of very heavy rope, new, and strong enough to sustain fifteen thousand pounds, but some of the doubtful workmen had cut several strands of it at various points on the outside of the coil; at least we could account in no other way for the damage. Besides, we had no blocks large enough to receive the rope even if
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
ism of fire. During subsequent attacks by land and water, it was battered by the heaviest Union artillery. Its walls were completely crushed, but the tons of iron projectiles imbedded in its ruins added strength to the inaccessible mass that surrounded it and made it impregnable. It was never taken, but the operations of General Sherman, after his march to the sea, compelled its evacuation, and the Stars and Stripes were again raised over it, April 14th, 1865. Under an order from Secretary Stanton, the same flag that was lowered, April 14th, 1861, was raised again over Sumter, by Major (then General) Anderson, on April 14th, 1865, the day President Lincoln was shot. Of Major Anderson's former officers, Generals Abner Doubleday and Norman J. Hall and Chaplain Matthias Harris were present. The Rev. Henry Ward Beecher delivered an oration, and other prominent antislavery men attended the ceremony.-editors. View of Cumming's Point. From a sketch made after the bombardment.
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The siege of Morris Island. (search)
Charleston, where the late rebellion had its birth. A strong earthwork, known as Battery Gregg, had been erected on Cumming's Point, at the north end of the island, mounting four ten-inch columbiads and one ten-inch mortar. This battery had been unsibility ends. This repulse caused a modification in the plan of operations. By possessing Wagner the works on Cumming's Point would have fallen of their own weight; whence it would be an easy matter to bombard Sumter. General Gillmore was noetween nine and ten the night before, and that we were marching to a bloodless victory. The enemy retired by way of Cumming's Point in boats, a few of them only falling into the hands of our boat infantry. Captain Walker, of the New York Volunteeret to work erecting strong batteries at the head of Morris Island for offensive and defensive purposes. Our guns at Cumming's Point were a mile and a half from Forts Johnston and Moultrie, and within less than a mile of Sumter; and from Charleston,
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First shot against the flag. (search)
itherto unknown to the garrison. Its fire would enfilade the most important battery of Fort Sumter, which was upon the parapet of the right flank of the work, and whose guns were mainly relied upon to control the fire from the heavy guns on Cumming's Point, that would take the fort in reverse. Bodies of troops were landed, and the batteries on shore fully manned, and every preparation completed, when, at four o'clock P. M., a boat under a white flag approached the fort. Two officials, aides-the work was severe and continued; the return from the fort slow and feeble, sounding like signals of distress to the nation, and, finally, ceased altogether. Seeing the condition of things, a Colonel Wigfall pushed out in an open boat from Cumming's Point-unauthorized it is true-and, learning from Major Anderson that he would evacuate the fort upon the terms originally proposed to him, returned and communicated with General Beauregard, who immediately sent a commission authorized to arrange t
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
used. About the same time that Captain Hamilton was constructing his floating battery, Mr. C. I. Steven, of Charleston (who, afterward, died a brigadier general at the battle of Chickamauga), commenced building an iron-clad land battery at Cumming's Point, the northern extremity of Morris Island, and the point nearest to Fort Sumter--that is, about thirteen hundred yards distant. This battery was to be built of heavy timbers covered with one layer of railroad iron, the rails well fitted into xperience as an engineer warranted. This battery took an active part in the attack, and was struck several times; but, excepting the jamming and disabling one of the shutters, the battery remained uninjured to the end of the fight. From Cumming's Point also, and in the same attack, was used the first rifled cannon fired in America. The day before I received orders from the Confederate Government, at Montgomery, to demand the evacuation or surrender of Fort Sumter, a vessel from England ar
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 5: Sumter. (search)
rming the harbor. These lay in a sort of triangle about the fort: Sullivan's Island, containing Fort Moultrie, to the northeast at a distance of 1,800 yards; Cumming's Point, on Morris Island, to the south at a distance of 1,300 yards; and on James Island, near old Fort Johnson, to the west at a distance of 2,500 yards. Their tota On this mainly the command made a breakfast, and at about seven o'clock Captain Abner Doubleday fired the first gun from the fort at an iron-clad battery on Cumming's Point. Reliefs were stationed at other guns, and soon Sumter was sending back a spirited reply. The three hours of unopposed bombardment from the rebel batterion of the first day Sumter kept up its fire, though with greatly slackened speed. Only six guns were kept in action for the remainder of the day: two against Cumming's Point on the south, and four against Fort Moultrie and other batteries on Sullivan's Island to the north. At nightfall even these ceased, as also did most of the g
ordingly made in a note borne by Colonel James Chesnut and Captain Lee, with the offer of permission for Major Anderson to salute the flag he had upheld with so much fortitude.” Major Anderson made answer on the same day, that he regretted that his sense of honor and of obligation to his government would not permit him to accede to the demand of General Beauregard. Next day at 4.30 A. M. the signal was given from Fort Johnston; the fire was gradually followed by shots from Moultrie, Cummings' Point, and the floating battery. Fort Sumter did not reply until seven o'clock. The firing continued all day. During the bombardment a portion of the Federal fleet rendezvoused off Charleston, but took no part in the fight. Early on the morning of the 13th the Confederate batteries renewed the bombardment, concentrating their fire on Fort Sumter, which directed a vigorous fire on Fort Moultrie. About eight o'clock in the morning, smoke was seen issuing from Fort Sumter. The fire of
w been held under a furious cannonade by land and sea, night and day, for fifty-seven days, and General Beauregard, who had been for some time considering the case, and to save the brave men forming the garrison of Wagner from the desperate chances of an assault, gave orders for its evacuation. Major Gilchrist on the Defence of Charleston. On the night of September 6th the island was evacuated. The enemy had now undisputed possession of the entire island, including the works at Cumming's Point. But over Sumter the Confederate flag floated, and the demand for its surrender was still rejected. On October 16, 1862, John Mitchell, the Irish patriot, arrived at Richmond. He had two sons in the Confederate army; one, T. K. Mitchell, a captain, fell at his post when in command of Fort Sumter. t For a full account, see The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government, by Jefferson Davis. Another effort to capture the fort was made by the Federals on the evening of Septemb
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Torpedo service in the Harbor and water defences of Charleston. (search)
w used. About the same time that Captain Hamilton was constructing his floating battery, Mr. C. H. Steven, of Charleston, (who afterward died a brigadier-general at the battle of Chickamauga,) commenced building an iron-clad land battery at Cumming's Point, the northern extremity of Morris Island and the point nearest to Fort Sumter--that is, about thirteen hundred yards distant. This battery was to be built of heavy timbers covered with one layer of railroad iron, the rails well-fitted into ey experience as an engineer warranted. This battery took an active part in the attack and was struck several times; but excepting the jamming and disabling one of the shutters, the battery remained uninjured to the end of the fight. From Cumming's Point also, and in the same attack, was used the first rifled cannon fired in America. The day before I received orders from the Confederate Government, at Montgomery, to demand the evacuation or surrender of Fort Sumter, a vessel from England ar
om the parapets, the posterns were closed, and the men ordered not to leave the bombproofs until summoned by the drum. At 4.30 A. M. fire was opened upon Fort Sumter from Fort Moultrie, and soon after from the batteries on Mount Pleasant, Cummings' Point, and the floating battery; in all 17 mortars and 30 large guns for shot — mostly columbiads. Meantime the garrison of Sumter took breakfast quietly at their regular hour, were then divided into three reliefs, each of which was to work the guns for four hours; and the fire of Sumter was opened at 7 A. M. from the lower tier of guns, upon Fort Moultrie, the iron battery on Cummings' Point, two batteries on Sullivan's Island, and the floating battery simultaneously. When the first relief went to work, the enthusiasm of the men was so great that the second and third reliefs could not be kept from the guns. As the fire of the enemy became warm, it was found that there was no portion of the fort not exposed to the fire of mortars.
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