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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 6 0 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 4 0 Browse Search
G. S. Hillard, Life and Campaigns of George B. McClellan, Major-General , U. S. Army 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Brazos River (Texas, United States) or search for Brazos River (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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hey reached Texas in the spring of 1862, physically worn by a winter campaign and their ranks depleted by the loss, as it was reported, of 500 of their body. The brigade for a time was distributed in different counties in Texas to recruit the companies and prepare for its future action in Texas and Louisiana. (See Appendix for details of this campaign.) A regiment of infantry was raised (styled the Thirteenth infantry, or Bates' regiment) and stationed at Velasco, at the mouth of the Brazos river, where it remained during the war. Its officers were Col. Joseph Bates and Lieut.-Col. Reuben Brown. Henry P. Cayce was at another time lieutenant-colonel, and during its service there were Majors R. L. Foard, S. L. Perry and L. C. Rountree. Reference will be further made of the officers when any action at the different ports of Texas shall have occurred. This must suffice for a description of the disposition of the Texas forces during the year 1861, so far as the records and other reli
, under Colonel Bradfute, successfully sustained an assault and bombardment through the 29th, and in the night spiked the guns, blew up the magazines, and made a safe retreat. It is learned from a report of General Banks of November 30th, that upon the capture of Fort Esperanza he stated that if he was furnished with another division he would capture Houston and Galveston. And in his report of December 1st, he announced his intention to move up the Matagorda peninsula to the mouth of the Brazos, and after capturing the forts at that place, make it his base for supplies in the movement against Houston and Galveston. But this movement had been anticipated, and General Magruder had collected a large force of Confederate and State troops on the prairie west of the Brazos to resist his invasion of the mainland. That may have somewhat influenced General Banks to suddenly change his plan of reaching the interior of Texas. At any rate, leaving a force in possession of the lower Rio Gran
successfully brought off Confederate stores and munitions valued at $1,000,000. During the following winter he commanded a force of 10,000 men on the coast, from Brazos to Matagorda bay: and early in 1864 he took several regiments of cavalry to Louisiana, with three of which he reported to Gen. Richard Taylor in time to participaruggle for the independence of Texas, and immediately started for Nacogdoches, the place of rendezvous. He arrived too late, but pushed on alone as far as the Brazos river, where he was taken ill and did not recover until after the fall of Alamo. Upon his recovery he joined the army of Gen. Sam Houston, on the eve of the battle nio, including coast points. On June 12, 1862, by virtue of a commission as brigadier-general, he took command of all the troops within the State east of the Brazos river and north of the old San Antonio road, with headquarters at Tyler, and forwarded troops to Little Rock. Six Texas brigades were put into Arkansas, and he was f