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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 106 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 32 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 16 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 16 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 14 0 Browse Search
Charles A. Nelson , A. M., Waltham, past, present and its industries, with an historical sketch of Watertown from its settlement in 1630 to the incorporation of Waltham, January 15, 1739. 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Dutch (West Virginia, United States) or search for Dutch (West Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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, it is true, in his own peculiar way, but Indian, Canadian, Irish, Dutch, French, and other bloods, course through his veins; and from his ee river cities of Missouri were preparing grand receptions for him; Dutch lager-bier brewers were laying in large stocks to meet the forthcom upon as a demigod. St. Louis and the West ran riot with delight. Dutch cheese, Dutch beer, Dutch bands, Dutch every thing was the order ofDutch beer, Dutch bands, Dutch every thing was the order of the day, and delightful guttural Dutch was the language of Fremont's embryo court, held with mock state in Choteau avenue. The ragged ConfedDutch bands, Dutch every thing was the order of the day, and delightful guttural Dutch was the language of Fremont's embryo court, held with mock state in Choteau avenue. The ragged Confederates, however, put a sudden stop to the round of conviviality and expense in which he indulged. Disaster attended the Federal army in theDutch every thing was the order of the day, and delightful guttural Dutch was the language of Fremont's embryo court, held with mock state in Choteau avenue. The ragged Confederates, however, put a sudden stop to the round of conviviality and expense in which he indulged. Disaster attended the Federal army in the West, and Fremont sank low in the opinion of even his former admirers. He was suddenly removed, and the Northern newspapers turned against Dutch was the language of Fremont's embryo court, held with mock state in Choteau avenue. The ragged Confederates, however, put a sudden stop to the round of conviviality and expense in which he indulged. Disaster attended the Federal army in the West, and Fremont sank low in the opinion of even his former admirers. He was suddenly removed, and the Northern newspapers turned against him. What had become of John Pope, late Commander--in Chief of the army of Virginia, was matter of speculation among all classes; but, fr
tate, has a German bodyguard, tricked out in what appears to be the cast-off finery of a third-class theatrical wardrobe. When he travels on the river, an entire steamboat is not more than sufficient to accommodate the majesty of Fremont; guards pace before his door night and day; servants in gay livery hand around catawba on silver waiters; grooms and orderlies flit about like poor imitations of the same class of servants in German cities, while the ruling language of the court is very low Dutch, redolent of lager-beer and schnapps But to return to the true object of this hurried letter. From those constantly arriving in camp, it was ascertained beyond a doubt that Fremont was strongly fortifying all important cities on the Missouri River, to serve as a safe base of operations, whence supplies could be easily transported into the interior by wagon-trains or boats. Lexington, held by Colonel Mulligan and a heavy force, was known to be strongly fortified, and being on high ground
tersign. Passing along I could not help lingering near my old plantations; regiments of New-Englanders were camped upon them, my woods, fences, and barns were all destroyed, and they had converted the dwellings into guard-houses, where dozens of Dutch and Irish were howling in intoxication. Possessed of the countersign, I found no difficulty in passing from place to place, and enjoyed myself until midnight with a lot of officers who were bent on a drinking bout. And now comes the most importion by separating them, I rode up to the house, and inquired if Captain Smidt was there; I had been told he was, and had been sent by General Stone to call him immediately. Smidt soon made his appearance, cursing and swearing in every dialect of Dutch and English. Some cot dem tyful hat watched him, sure, unt he was a gone schicken, else how old Shstone know him not gone? While I condoled with Smidt, he was seized and secured without a show of resistance. We then waited a short time until
ly for European circulation, spoke of the rebellion as nigh broken up, and described our troops as ragged, hungry, footsore, and dispirited-all they want now is one more twist of the Anaconda's coil, etc. I will not deny that two or three hundred Dutch, Jews, and unnaturalized foreigners were captured by the enemy's cavalry, and that some few of them, tired of war, took the oath of allegiance, and went North; but this was blazoned abroad with great exaggeration, and the silly multitude of Aboli, their recklessness and daring have always astonished me, yet, considering their material, half Creole, half Irish, none need be astonished to find them nonpareils, when fighting for their homes and liberty against a negro-worshipping mixture of Dutch and Yankee. In this, as in all other fights witnessed by me, the cavalry had very little to do — the Yankee horse were always in the rear collecting stragglers, and forcing men to keep their lines. The day before had witnessed slight cavalry sk
e Valley, push on through Harrisonburgh, and attack us at McGackeysville; but, after some days, it was ascertained that he remained enjoying the fruits of the battle of Kearnstown, and was waiting until Milroy and Blenker should clear Western Virginia, and arrive on a line with him, when they would all join McDowell at Fredericksburgh. Jackson was not many days at McGackeysville, when a courier from the Georgian, Colonel Johnson, arrived, and informed him that Blenker and Milroy, with their Dutch division, were advancing eastward in Western Virginia, and that his small force of fifteen hundred men was falling back before them. When this news was received, Jackson, finding his original command fully rested, left Ewell's force of ten thousand at McGackeysville, and sallied out during the night, none knew whither. Keeping to the mountains until he arrived at Port Republic, he struck the Valley Pike there, proceeded on, by night and day, towards Staunton, and then, without entering
bird in the hand was worth two in the bush; others resigned, but could not get South; some were accused of sympathy and imprisoned; while others quietly settled down into business, and now await the adjustment of affairs, to come and live among us. Yes, Yes, said one, emphatically; I expect there will not be scores only, but thousands expressing excellent Southern sentiments when the war is over, and asserting their sympathies were always with us. There will then be thousands of Jews and Dutch willing to swear the same until black in the face; but if I am not mistaken, our people understand that question as well as Government, and will take more than usual care to protect themselves against the hordes which have been the chief movers and instigators of all theisms, usurpation, and despotism of the North. There are hundreds of democrats in New-York and other States, particularly in the West, who now sincerely regret that avarice and love of power prompted them to use the fanatica
light and heavy infantry and cavalry, their rifles, and every branch of the service well represented, each having its particular part to play in skirmish or battle; but owing to our hurry in forming the Southern army, and the continual succession of stirring events, we have but three classes-artillery, infantry, and cavalry-without further distinctions; and one regiment is considered as heavy as another if it musters only five hundred men. The enemy have splendid bands, for there are German, Dutch, Italians, and French in their ranks by tens of thousands. Not so with us. The ruling foreign element with us is Irish, and, although Irishmen are passionately fond of music, they still cling to the musket, and make music of their own in the hour of battle. I wish we had a hundred thousand of them; they make the best soldiers in the world. We have some good bands in the service, Major, though I confess but few of them. The Louisiana bands are occasionally good, and that of the First
unt I show him some tings! A lady present told him that a few of Fitz-Hugh Lee's cavalry had just left. Goot! Young voomans, said Meinheer, and immediately started in pursuit, saying, Ve show de repels some tings. The major and his command had fairly got into the main street, when a few squadrons of Confederate cavalry met them, and both parties rushed together in strife, and, within a few moments afterwards, the Federals retreated, amid the hoots and groans of those at the windows. The Dutch major was, shortly afterwards, pulled out of a cottage, and with a table-cloth wound round a slight wound in his head, was sent to our rear. and the South Mountain were open to him, his advance was slow and tedious; while, on the other hand, Confederate generals were unusually active, and preparing to capture the Ferry, together with the garrison and its numerous supplies. The position of D. H. Hill in the mountains had been designed for no other purpose than to occupy the roads and delay