Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) or search for Edgefield (Tennessee, United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Allatoona pass, (search)
ietta; but Sherman, who had been reinforced by two divisions under Gen. Frank P. Blair (June 8), very soon caused him to abandon that position, cross the Chattahoochee River, and finally to rest at Atlanta. After the evacuation of Atlanta (Sept. 2, 1864), Sherman and Hood reorganized their armies in preparation for a vigorous fall campaign. Satisfied that Hood intended to assume the offensive and probably attempt the seizure of Tennessee, Sherman sent Thomas, his second in command, to Nashville, to organize the new troops expected to gather there, and to make arrangements to meet such an emergency. Thomas arrived there Oct. 3. Meanwhile the Confederates had crossed the Chattahoochee, and by a rapid movement had struck the railway at Big Shanty, north of Marietta, and destroyed it for several miles. A division of infantry pushed northward and appeared before Allatoona, where Colonel Tourtellotte was guarding 1,000,000 National rations with only three thin regiments. Sherman ma
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
ne 21 and 22, Kenesaw (Ga.)June 27, 1864 Peach-tree Creek (Ga.)July 20, 1864 Decatur (Ga.)July 22, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.)July 28, 1864 Petersburg (Va. ; Mine Explosion)July 30, 1864 Mobile BayAug. 5, 1864 Jonesboro (Ga.)Aug. 31 and Sept. 1, 1864 Atlanta (Ga.; Captured)Sept. 2, 1864 Winchester (Va.)Sept. 19, 1864 Fisher's Hill (Va.)Sept. 22, 1864 Allatoona Pass (Ga.)Oct. 6, 1864 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Oct. 27, 1864 Franklin (Tenn.)Nov. 30, 1864 Fort McAllister (Ga.)Dec. 14, 1864 Nashville (Tenn.)Dec. 15 and 16, Fort Fisher (N. C.; First Attack on)Dec. 24 and 25, Fort Fisher (N. C.; Capture of)Jan. 15, 1865 Hatcher's Run (Va.)Feb. 5, 1865 Averasboro (N. C.)Mar. 16, 1865 Bentonville (N. C.)Mar. 18, 1865 Five Forks (Va.)Mar. 31 and April 1, 1865 Petersburg (Carried by Assault)April 2, 1865 Appomattox Court-House (near)April 9, 1865 Mobile (Capture of)April 8-12, 1865 War with Spain. Destruction of Spanish fleet in Manila BayMay 1, 1898 Bombardment of San Juan. Porto
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Bell, John, -1869 (search)
Bell, John, -1869 Statesman; born near Nashville, Tenn., Feb. 15, 1797; was graduated at Cumberland College (now the University of Nashville) in 1814, and studied law in Franklin, Tenn. In 1817 he was elected to the State Senate. After the expiration of his term he practised law till 1827, when he was elected to Congress. he served in the House of Representatives till 1841 by re-elections. After abandoning his free-trade views, he became one of the founders of the Whig party (q. v.), and was elected speaker of the House of Representatives in 1834. President Harrison appointed him Secretary of War in 1841, but he resigned with other members of the cabinet (excepting Daniel Webster) when President Tyler left the Whig party. In 1847-59 he was a member of the United States Senate, and in 1860 he was the unsuccessful candidate of the constitutional Union party (q. v.) for President, with Edward Everett for Vice-President. He died in Cumberland, Tenn., Sept. 10, 1869.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Benton, Thomas Hart, -1858 (search)
homas Hart, -1858 Statesman; born near Hillsboro, N. C., March 14, 1782. Before finishing his studies at Chapel Hill University, North Carolina, he removed to Tennessee, studied law, and obtained great eminence in his profession. In the legislature of that State he procured the enactment of a law giving to slaves the benefit of a jury trial, and also succeeded in having a law passed which reformed the judicial system of the State. He had been on intimate terms with General Jackson at Nashville (1813), when a quarrel ensued, and in a personal encounter in that town with deadly weapons both parties gave and received severe wounds. He was colonel of a Tennessee regiment from December, 1812, to April, 1813, and lieutenant-colonel in the regular army from 1813 to 1815. Removing to St. Louis in 1813, he established the Missouri inquirer there, and practised his profession. He took an Thomas Hart Benton. active part in favoring the admission of Missouri as a State of the Union, an
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Brownlow, William Gannaway, 1805- (search)
r, 1861, he was arrested, by order of the Confederate authorities, on a charge of treason against the Confederacy, and confined in Knoxville jail, where he suffered much until released in March, 1862. Then he was sent within the Union lines at Nashville. Afterwards he made a tour in the Northern States, delivering speeches in the principal cities. At Philadelphia he was joined by his family, who had been expelled from Knoxville, where he published Sketches of the rise, progress, and decline that I am a bad man, and dangerous to the Confederacy, and that you desire me out of it. Just give me my passport, and I will do for your Confederacy more than the devil has ever done — I will quit the country. Benjamin soon afterwards indicated a wish that Brownlow should be sent out of the Confederacy, only, he said, because color is given to the suspicion that he has been entrapped. He was finally released, and sent to Nashville (then in possession of National troops) early in March, 186
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
ing there some time, Burr pressed forward, and at Louisville overtook Matthew Lyon (q. v.), with whom he had voyaged in company in the earlier part of the journey. He accompanied Lyon to his home on the Cumberland River, whence he journeyed to Nashville on horseback; had a public reception (May 28, 1805), in which Andrew Jackson participated; and, furnished with a boat by that gentleman, returned to Lyon's. Then he resumed his voyage in his own ark, and met Wilkinson at Fort Massac, nearly oppican immigrants were divided by bitter political and private feuds. Burr remained only a short time, when he reascended the Mississippi to Natchez, whence he travelled through the wilderness, along an Indian trail or bridle-path, 450 miles, to Nashville, where he was entertained for a week by Jackson early in August. After spending a few weeks there, Burr made his way through the Indian Territory to St. Louis, where he again met Wilkinson, that being the seat of government of the Louisiana Te
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cemeteries, National (search)
93921 Marietta, Ga7,1882,963 Barrancas, Fla 798657 Mobile, Ala756113 Corinth, Miss 1,7893,927 Natchez, Miss3082.780 Vicksburg, Miss3,89612,704 Alexandria, La534772 Baton Rouge, La2,469495 Chalmette, La 6,8375,674 Port Hudson, La5963,223 Brownsville, Tex 1,4171,379 San Antonio, Tex324167 Fayetteville, Ark 431781 Fort Smith, Ark 7111,152 Little Rock, Ark 3,2652,337 Chattanooga, Tenn 7,9994,963 Fort Donelson, Tenn158511 Knoxville, Tenn2,0901,046 Memphis, Tenn 5,1608,817 Nashville, Tenn 11,8254,701 Pittsburg Landing, Tenn.. 1,2292,361 Stone River, Tenn3,8212,324 Camp Nelson, Ky2,4771,165 Cave Hill, Louisville, Ky3,344583 Danville, Ky 3358 Lebanon, Ky 591277 Lexington, Ky805108 Logan's, Ky 345366 Crown Hill, Indianapolis, Ind.68132 New Albany, Ind. 2,139676 Camp Butler, Ill. 1,007355 Mound City, Ill. 2,5052,721 Rock Island, Ill. 27719 Jefferson Barracks, Mo 8,5842,906 Jefferson City, Mo 349412 Springfield, Mo845713 Fort Leavenworth, Kan..835928 Fort Sc
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Census, United States (search)
726,824 Fall River, Mass.104,86374,39830,465 St. Joseph, Mo.102,97952,32450,655 Omaha, Neb.102,555140,452*37,897 Los Angeles, Cal.102,47950,39552,084 Memphis, Tenn.102,32064,49537,825 Scranton, Pa.102,02675,21526,811 Lowell, Mass.94,96977,69617,273 Albany, N. Y.94,15194,923*772 Cambridge, Mass.91,88670,02821,858 Portland, Ore.90,42646,38544,041 Atlanta. Ga.89,87265,53324,339 Grand Rapids, Mich.87,56560,27827,287 Dayton, O.85,33361,22024,113 Richmond, Va.85,05081,3883,662 Nashville, Tenn.80,86576,1684,697 Seattle, Wash.80,67142,83737,834 Hartford, Conn.79,85053,23026,620 Reading, Pa.78,96158,66120,300 Wilmington, Del.76,50861,43115,077 Camden, N. J.75,93558,31317,622 Trenton, N. J.73,30757,45815,849 Bridgeport, Conn.70,99648,86622,130 Lynn, Mass.68,51355,72712,786 Oakland, Cal.66,96048,68218,278 Lawrence, Mass.62,55944,65417,905 New Bedford. Mass.62,44240,73321,709 Des Moines, Ia.62,13950,09312,046 Springfield, Mass.62,05944,17917,880 Somerville, Mass.61,6
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cheatham, Benjamin Franklin 1820-1886 (search)
Cheatham, Benjamin Franklin 1820-1886 Mil- itary officer; born in Nashville, Tenn., Oct. 20, 1820. He entered the Mexican War as captain in the 1st Tennessee Regiment; distinguished himself in the battles of Monterey, Medelin, and Cerro Gordo, nto Kentucky in September, 1862. Later he was promoted to major-general, and was engaged at Chickamauga, Chattanooga,, Nashville, and other places. After the war he applied himself chiefly to agriculture. In October, 1885, he was made postmaster oted to major-general, and was engaged at Chickamauga, Chattanooga,, Nashville, and other places. After the war he applied himself chiefly to agriculture. In October, 1885, he was made postmaster of Nashville. He died in Nashville, Sept. 4, 1886.oted to major-general, and was engaged at Chickamauga, Chattanooga,, Nashville, and other places. After the war he applied himself chiefly to agriculture. In October, 1885, he was made postmaster of Nashville. He died in Nashville, Sept. 4, 1886.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Civil War in the United States. (search)
National train of wagons near Bardstown, Ky., and at daylight they captured another train there.—21. Confederates near Nashville attacked and dispersed. —22. The governor of Kentucky called on the people of Louisville to defend the menaced city.—2 escape with Confederate despatches. National troops destroy saltworks at Kingsbury, Ga.—5. The Confederates attacked Nashville and were repulsed. General Burnside superseded General McClellan in command of the Army of the Potomac.—9. Town of Stclad gunboats, and the harbor proclaimed opened by Beauregard and the Confederate Secretary of State. Skirmish near Nashville, Tenn., and the Confederates defeated.—Feb. 1. National troops occupy Franklin, Tenn.—2. United States House of Representad the blockade at Norfolk, Va., and Pensacola and Fernandina, Fla.—22. Hood advances from near Florence, Ala., towards Nashville, with 40,000 Confederate troops.—24. Thanksgiving Day observed in the Army of the Potomac, when 59,000 lbs.
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