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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
ort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and childrill suffer. He did not take my advice, and was sent to Fort Delaware. On the march to Fredericksburg we met 25,000 soldierd. After a few days at this place we were removed to Fort Delaware. Here we remained until August 20th. Under fire of a special guard looked after us, until we were sent to Fort Delaware, March 8, 1865. On that day all the prisoners were ty broke over us. We were guarded there until we reached Fort Delaware. March 12th. The other prisoners were taken off and given other quarters in the barracks at Fort Delaware, but we, the eight, were taken to General Scheoff's headquarters and tn to prisoner's life occurred while we were confined at Fort Delaware, until the 17th of June, 1865, when all the line office but what he might be dead. My brother and I went from Fort Delaware to Baltimore. He went on to California, while I return
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The trials and trial of Jefferson Davis. (search)
r of Rebellion, p. 560.) On the 19th of May the steamer Clyde reached Fortress Monroe, having aboard Mr. Davis and family, Mr. Stephens, Mr. Reagan, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Clay, Major-General Joseph Wheeler and staff, Colonels Johnston and Lubbock, and Mr. Burton N. Harrison, besides one or two subaltern officers. The safeguards were at once augmented by placing a gunboat on each side of the Clyde. Stephens and Reagan were sent to Fort Warren; Wheeler and staff, Johnston and Lubbock, to Fort Delaware, and Harrison to Washington, while the women and children were sent back South. Fearing that Halleck might not be harsh enough or Miles sharp enough for the occasion, Mr. Stanton sent the Assistant Secretary of War, Mr. C. A. Dana, to the fort to supervise the details of the incarceration of the two prisoners, Davis and Clay. He was present on the 22d of June, when they were removed, and wrote a graphic account of the proceeding, which has been preserved (121 War of Rebellion, p. 563
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
e severity of this conflict is the stump of a 16-inch hickory tree, now in the Smithsonian Institution at Washington, which was literally cut down with minie balls, for the Wilderness was such that artillery could not be used. Major-General Edward Johnson, of Virginia, was captured with me in the trenches, and as we were going to the rear I said to the general: Throw off your coat and go as a private. In case of retaliation you will suffer. He did not take my advice, and was sent to Fort Delaware. On the march to Fredericksburg we met 25,000 soldiers who had been doing garrison duty at Washington, and ordered to join General Grant. We were meeting each other for some hours and they guyed us all along. I recollect one said, Hello, Johnnies. We are taking you North to give you something to eat and put some shoes on your feet. Some of us needed shoes. In fact, we were hatless, shoeless, and coatless. We were taken to Point Lookout, Md., and after three months transferred to