Your search returned 375 results in 96 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6 ...
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., With Slemmer in Pensacola Harbor. (search)
editors. Entering Pensacola Harbor from the Gulf of Mexico, one sees as he crosses the bar, immediately to his left, Fort McRee on the mainland, or west shore of the bay, and to his right Fort Pickens on the western extremity of Santa Rosa Island,ola Bay. On the mainland, directly opposite Fort Pickens, about a mile and a half from it and two miles north-east of Fort McRee, stands Fort Barrancas, and, now forming a part of it, the little old Spanish fort, San Carlos de Barrancas. About a mFlag-Officer McKean) and Richmond (Captain Ellison), and by Fort Pickens and the neighboring Union batteries. Although Fort McRee was so badly injured that General Bragg entertained the idea of abandoning it, the plan of the Union commanders to takethe idea of abandoning it, the plan of the Union commanders to take and destroy it was not executed. January 1st, 1862. Bombardment of Forts McRee and Barrancas by Union batteries. May 9th. Burning and evacuation of Pensacola. editors.
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 2: Charleston Harbor. (search)
ecame an organized rebellion against the government of the Union. Nor was this the only advantage which the conspiracy had secured. Since the 12th of January a condition of things existed in the harbor of Pensacola, Fla., similar to that at Charleston. The insurgents had threatened, and the officer in charge had surrendered the Pensacola Navy Yard. Lieutenant Slemmer, of the army, with a little garrison of forty-six men, held Fort Barrancas. Finding he could not defend his post, nor Fort McRee, also on the mainland, he, with a loyal courage which will ever render his name illustrious, repeated the strategy of Anderson, and moved his slender command, augmented by thirty ordinary seamen from the navy yard, on the morning of January 10th, to Fort Pickens, a large and more defensible work standing at the harbor entrance, on the western end of Santa Rosa Island. The Government hurriedly sent a few ships of war to assist him, while the rebels began gathering an army to assault the fo
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
ant, 96 McClellan, Gen. George B., placed in command of Dept. of the Ohio, 140; in West Va., 143, 140 et seq., 153 et seq.; appointed to command the army of the Potomac, 207, 208 McDowell, General, Irvin, in command at Arlington Heights, 173; his plan and movements, 173 et seq.; his report cited, 175; plan of battle at Bull Run, 177; change in his plans, 179, 181; his action during and after the battle, 181-205; in charge of the Virginia defences, 208 McLean's Ford, 176, note McRee, Fort, 38 Memphis, 133 Miles, General D. S., commands Fifth Division on advance to Manassas, 174; misconduct and suspension of, 199, 204 Militia, first call for, 73 et seq. Milroy, Colonel, 152 et seq. Melvale, 90 Mississippi, attitude of, with regard to secession, 2, 8; secession of, 14 Missouri, attitude of, with regard to secession, 52, 80, 115; Unionists of, 120; without local government, 124; rescued from secessionists, 125, 131, 133 Mitchell's Ford, 176, note
nd brings the latest intelligence. As details are not to be expected, we may state generally that the condition of the troops and fortifications is all that could be desired. Gen. Bragg has proved the very man for the work, and the volunteers lend a ready hand to carry out every order. Pickens is covered by our batteries on three sides. There are eight between the Navy-Yard and Fort Barrancas, four between the latter and the light-house, and a formidable mortar battery in the rear of Fort McRae. There is also a heavy mortar battery in the rear of Barrancas. All these works have been erected by the hands of the volunteers, and are armed with the very heaviest and best of artillery. The channel on a line between McRae and Pickens has been obstructed by sinking a number of small vessels. It was supposed that every thing would be complete by the middle of the coming week, after which we shall have a bombardment that will be worthy of record. Pickens must fall, and the more men t
t home, having been in the mean time encamped in Pennsylvania--first at Lancaster, and afterwards near Philadelphia. They left the latter city early yesterday morning, on the railroad, coming by way of Baltimore.--(Doc. 190 1/2.) An immense dry-dock was anchored at night in the Pensacola channel east of Fort Pickens by the rebels, who had intended, however, to anchor it elsewhere. Gen. Brown, in command at the fort, forbade its further removal. Its anchorage between Forts Pickens and McRae was for some time contemplated.--New Orleans Delta, May 24. A battery of Whitworth guns, twelve-pounders, with ammunition and carriages complete, arrived in New York city, as a present to the Government from patriotic Americans abroad. The battery is consigned to Henry F. Spaulding, Samuel D. Babcock, and Henry A. Smythe, who have informed Secretary Cameron of its arrival, and that it is at the disposition of the Government. Each one of the guns bears the following inscription:
ews, where they shelled the camp of the Second Louisiana regiment, completely destroying it, and causing much havoc among the rebels.--(Doc. 184.) The Second regiment of cavalry N. Y. S. V., Black horse cavalry, under the command of Colonel A. J. Morrison, left Camp Strong, near Troy, for the seat of war. Previous to their departure the troops were presented with an elegant stand of colors. Col. Morrison is an officer of considerable military experience. He served in the Mexican war, in the expeditions of Lopez and Walker, and with Garibaldi in Italy. On his return to the United States he was authorized to raise a regiment of cavalry, which he has designated the Black horse cavalry, and which is now the second regiment of volunteer cavalry of New York. Fort Pickens opened fire upon the rebel steamer Time, just as she entered the Navy yard at Warrington, Fla., and was answered by the rebels at Forts Barrancas and McRae. The firing continued upon both sides nearly all day.
November 23. The bombardment of the rebel Forts McRae and Barrancas was continued from Fort Pickens and the National ships in Pensacola harbor. Fort McRae was completely silenced, and Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H.Fort McRae was completely silenced, and Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H. H. Lockwood, in command of the Union force on the eastern shore of Virginia, issued a proclamation, by which the various officers of the civil government in that locality were restored to the exercise of their functions interrupted by the ordinance of secession. This expedition accomplished important results without bloodshed. Ten pieces of cannon were captured, eight of them new and in good condition; also a thousand stand of arms, rebel flags, &c.--(Doc. 185.) The Confederate gunboat
May 9. This night the rebels evacuated Pensacola, Florida, and set fire to the forts, navy-yard, barracks, and marine hospital. General Arnold, at Fort Pickens, commenced a bombardment when the destruction of property was begun, with the hope of saving a portion of the forts and property. The steamers Bradford and Neaffie were burnt. Fort McRae, the hospital, and navy-yard were destroyed. The barracks were saved, as were also the foundry and black-smith shop in the navy-yard.--(Doc. 13.) This morning, a company of rebel cavalry, one hundred strong, under command of Captain Walker, made a dash on Washington, N. C., with the avowed purpose of capturing all the Federal officers, and suddenly returning before the gunboats could open upon them. But the pickets heard them approaching, and several of them united their squads, and poured a raking fire into them, killing Captain Walker and five men, besides wounding several others. The cavalry immediately retreated without eff
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
nsisted of Fort Jefferson, at the Garden Key, Tortugas; Fort Taylor, at Key West; Forts Pickens, McRee, and Barrancas, near the entrance to Pensacola Bay (a fine expanse of water at the mouth of the entrance to the harbor. Nearly opposite, but a little farther seaward, on a low sand-spit, is Fort McRee. Across from Fort Pickens, on the main, is Fort Barrancas, built by the Spaniards, taken fromry men were then foremost at that post in disloyal designs. It was even so. Forts Pickens and McRee. Fort McRee, on the main, is seen in the distance, on the extreme right of the picture. OFort McRee, on the main, is seen in the distance, on the extreme right of the picture. On the morning of the 10th, January, 1861. the Wyandot carried over Slemmer's command. All night long, and all the day before, the men, the officers and their wives, and even children, worked withoutrt Barrancas, and restored the disabled guns; and another party was soon afterward thrown into Fort McRee. Farrand, Renshaw, Randolph, and Eggleston had already sent their resignations to Washington,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 12: the inauguration of President Lincoln, and the Ideas and policy of the Government. (search)
hin the Slave-labor States, only Fortress Monroe, and Forts Jefferson, Taylor, and Pickens, remained in possession of the Government. The seized forts were sixteen in number. The following are the names and locations of the seized forts:--Pulaski and Jackson, at Savannah; Morgan and Gaines, at Mobile; Macon, at Beaufort, North Carolina; Caswell, at Oak Island, North Carolina; Moultrie and Castle Pinckney, at Charleston; St. Philip, Jackson, Pike, Macomb, and Livingston, in Louisiana; and McRee, Barrancas, and a redoubt in Florida. They had cost the Government about seven millions of dollars, and bore an aggregate of one thousand two hundred and twenty-six guns. All the arsenals in the Cotton-growing States had been seized. That at Little Rock, the capital of the State of Arkansas, was taken possession of by the militia of that State, under the direction of the disloyal Governor Rector, on the 5th of February. They came from Helena, and readily obtained the Governor's sanction t
1 2 3 4 5 6 ...