Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Fort McRae (Florida, United States) or search for Fort McRae (Florida, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

nd brings the latest intelligence. As details are not to be expected, we may state generally that the condition of the troops and fortifications is all that could be desired. Gen. Bragg has proved the very man for the work, and the volunteers lend a ready hand to carry out every order. Pickens is covered by our batteries on three sides. There are eight between the Navy-Yard and Fort Barrancas, four between the latter and the light-house, and a formidable mortar battery in the rear of Fort McRae. There is also a heavy mortar battery in the rear of Barrancas. All these works have been erected by the hands of the volunteers, and are armed with the very heaviest and best of artillery. The channel on a line between McRae and Pickens has been obstructed by sinking a number of small vessels. It was supposed that every thing would be complete by the middle of the coming week, after which we shall have a bombardment that will be worthy of record. Pickens must fall, and the more men t
t home, having been in the mean time encamped in Pennsylvania--first at Lancaster, and afterwards near Philadelphia. They left the latter city early yesterday morning, on the railroad, coming by way of Baltimore.--(Doc. 190 1/2.) An immense dry-dock was anchored at night in the Pensacola channel east of Fort Pickens by the rebels, who had intended, however, to anchor it elsewhere. Gen. Brown, in command at the fort, forbade its further removal. Its anchorage between Forts Pickens and McRae was for some time contemplated.--New Orleans Delta, May 24. A battery of Whitworth guns, twelve-pounders, with ammunition and carriages complete, arrived in New York city, as a present to the Government from patriotic Americans abroad. The battery is consigned to Henry F. Spaulding, Samuel D. Babcock, and Henry A. Smythe, who have informed Secretary Cameron of its arrival, and that it is at the disposition of the Government. Each one of the guns bears the following inscription:
ews, where they shelled the camp of the Second Louisiana regiment, completely destroying it, and causing much havoc among the rebels.--(Doc. 184.) The Second regiment of cavalry N. Y. S. V., Black horse cavalry, under the command of Colonel A. J. Morrison, left Camp Strong, near Troy, for the seat of war. Previous to their departure the troops were presented with an elegant stand of colors. Col. Morrison is an officer of considerable military experience. He served in the Mexican war, in the expeditions of Lopez and Walker, and with Garibaldi in Italy. On his return to the United States he was authorized to raise a regiment of cavalry, which he has designated the Black horse cavalry, and which is now the second regiment of volunteer cavalry of New York. Fort Pickens opened fire upon the rebel steamer Time, just as she entered the Navy yard at Warrington, Fla., and was answered by the rebels at Forts Barrancas and McRae. The firing continued upon both sides nearly all day.
November 23. The bombardment of the rebel Forts McRae and Barrancas was continued from Fort Pickens and the National ships in Pensacola harbor. Fort McRae was completely silenced, and Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H.Fort McRae was completely silenced, and Barrancas and the Navy yard at Warrington very much damaged. The town of Warrington was destroyed, together with the rebel rifle works at that place. Fort Pickens sustained no damage beyond the disabling of one gun. The loss on the Union side was one killed and six wounded.--(Doc. 191.) Brig.-Gen. H. H. Lockwood, in command of the Union force on the eastern shore of Virginia, issued a proclamation, by which the various officers of the civil government in that locality were restored to the exercise of their functions interrupted by the ordinance of secession. This expedition accomplished important results without bloodshed. Ten pieces of cannon were captured, eight of them new and in good condition; also a thousand stand of arms, rebel flags, &c.--(Doc. 185.) The Confederate gunboat
May 9. This night the rebels evacuated Pensacola, Florida, and set fire to the forts, navy-yard, barracks, and marine hospital. General Arnold, at Fort Pickens, commenced a bombardment when the destruction of property was begun, with the hope of saving a portion of the forts and property. The steamers Bradford and Neaffie were burnt. Fort McRae, the hospital, and navy-yard were destroyed. The barracks were saved, as were also the foundry and black-smith shop in the navy-yard.--(Doc. 13.) This morning, a company of rebel cavalry, one hundred strong, under command of Captain Walker, made a dash on Washington, N. C., with the avowed purpose of capturing all the Federal officers, and suddenly returning before the gunboats could open upon them. But the pickets heard them approaching, and several of them united their squads, and poured a raking fire into them, killing Captain Walker and five men, besides wounding several others. The cavalry immediately retreated without eff