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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., From Moultrie to Sumter. (search)
From Moultrie to Sumter. Abner Doubleday, Brevet Major-General, U. S. A., Retired. View single ordnance sergeant. The garrison of Fort Moultrie consisted of 2 companies that had been red band raised the number in the post to 73. Fort Moultrie had no strength; it was merely a sea batteson wanted the sand removed from the walls of Moultrie, and urged that it be done. Suddenly the Secederate forces. He appropriated $150,000 for Moultrie and $80,000 to finish Sumter. There was not but Anderson said he had been assigned to Fort Moultrie, and that he must stay there. We were theole situation, and who had orders to put both Moultrie and Sumter in perfect order, brought several of secessionists were The sea battery of Fort Moultrie. From a photograph taken before the war. my company had been left with a rearguard at Moultrie. These, with Captain Foster and Assistant-Suille. One day he went to the commander of Fort Moultrie and said to him: Will any impediment be pu[7 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Inside Sumter: in 1861. (search)
ton Harbor, consisting of Castle Pinckney, Fort Moultrie, and Fort Sumter, were garrisoned by an ard, was designed for a garrison of 650. Fort Moultrie, at the time of which we write, was considful to the Union. The old commander of Fort Moultrie, Colonel John L. Gardner, was removed; thefew minutes after sunset when the troops left Moultrie; the short twilight was about over when they dvantage of unlimited labor and material. Fort Moultrie had its armament again in position, and wahat time Sumter was master of the situation. Moultrie had very few guns mounted,--only one, accordi shot. As she approached, a single gun at Fort Moultrie opened at extreme long range, its shot fally Major Anderson, with Chaplain Harris of Fort Moultrie, who perhaps had been-summoned for the purhave set fire to the barracks and quarters in Moultrie; for, as it was, we wrecked them badly with seeping sort of gesture in the direction of Fort Moultrie, and said, Very well, gentlemen, you can r[13 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first step in the War. (search)
e believed, by the occupation of her territory. After the evacuation of Fort Moultrie, although Major Anderson was not permitted by the South Carolina authoritieSouth Carolina, and afterward of the Confederate States, took possession of Fort Moultrie, Castle Pinckney, the arsenal, and other United States, property in the vicinity. They also remounted the guns at Fort Moultrie, and constructed batteries on Sullivan's, Morris, and James islands, and at other places, looking to the reductn the barracks in Fort Sumter were set on fire by hot shot from the guns of Fort Moultrie. As soon as this was discovered, the Confederate batteries redoubled theionel Roswell S. Ripley, commanding the artillery: Five-gun Battery (east of Fort Moultrie), Captain S. Y. Tupper; Maffit Channel Battery (2 guns) and Mortar Battery . 2 (2 10-inch mortars), Captain William Butler, Lieutenant J. A. Huguenin; Fort Moultrie (30 guns), Captain W. R. Calhoun: consisting of Channel Battery, Lieutenant
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. (search)
Notes on the surrender of Fort Sumter. A. R. Chisolm, Colonel, C. S. A. Very soon after Major Robert Anderson moved with his command into Fort Sumter from Fort Moultrie, Governor Francis W. Pickens sent James Fraser, of the Charleston Light Dragoons, to me at my plantation, fifty miles south of Charleston, with the request that I would assist with my negroes in constructing batteries on Morris Island. Taking my own negro men and others from the plantation of my uncle, Robert Chisolm, aork untenable. Beauregard then informed me that if necessary he would go there and hold the fort with his staff; that on no condition would he consent to give it up to General Gillmore. It was after this that General (then Major) Stephen Elliott made his gallant defense of the ruins; when, with the exception of some guns buried under the ruins of the casemate facing Fort Moultrie, but one small gun remained mounted, and that was pointed toward the city, being used merely to fire the salutes.