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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 304 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 92 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 56 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 24 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 22 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 20 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 18 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Groveton (Virginia, United States) or search for Groveton (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 12 results in 6 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Groveton, battle of. (search)
Groveton, battle of. After the battle at Cedar Mountain (q. v.), Pope took position with his army along the line of the Rapidan, where he was reinforced by troops from North Carolina, under Burnside and Stevens. The Confederates now concentrs on the banks of the James. The order was at once repeated, but it was twenty days after it Map of the operations at Groveton. was first given before the transfer was accomplished. Meanwhile, General Lee having massed a heavy force on Pope's frounction. Near the entrance to Thoroughfare Gap, through which Longstreet had marched, there was Soldiers' monument at Groveton. a sharp engagement, which ended at twilight. Longstreet was held in check for a while by Ricketts's division, and the confused. Lee's whole army, now combined, pressed forward. Pope ordered Sigel, supported by Reynolds, to advance from Groveton and attack Jackson on wooded heights near. He ordered Heintzelman, with the divisions of Hooker and Kearny, towards Gai
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Logan, John Alexander 1826-1886 (search)
nton, Gainesville, and Centreville pike, extending his left beyond the right flank of Jackson, on and up the pike beyond Groveton. Pope issued an order at three o'clock A. M. for Porter to move at daylight to Centreville. This order being a verbal march was on the road from Manassas Station across Dawkins's Branch to Gainesville, passing some 2 miles to the left of Groveton, the whole distance being 8 miles. He moved slowly and leisurely, and arrived at Dawkins's Branch at twelve o'clock, a distance of 5 miles. By this time Longstreet had his command between Gainesville and Groveton, forming his line on Pageland Lane, to the right and rear of Jackson, his right resting on the old Manassas Gap Railroad, which lay between the Warrenton and command (besides his artillery), that were formed in battery and playing furiously upon Pope's left in the direction of Groveton, and at four o'clock were attacking Pope's left at that very time, and they were not withdrawn, but continued the onslau
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Manassas Junction. (search)
t was disappointed. When it became clear that he would receive no aid from McClellan, he had no other alternative than to fight or surrender, so he put his line into V shape on the morning of Aug. 30. Lee made a movement which gave Pope the impression that the Confederates were retreating, and the latter telegraphed to Washington to that effect. He ordered a pursuit. When, at 10 A. M., an attempt was made to execute this order, a fearful state of things was developed. The eminence near Groveton was found to be swarming with Confederates, who, instead of retreating, had been massing under cover of the forest, in preparation for an offensive movement. They opened a furious fire on the front of the Nationals, and at the same time made a heavy flank movement. Porter's corps, which had been made to recoil by the first unexpected blow, rallied, and performed specially good service. Ricketts meanwhile had hastened to the left. By the disposition of Reynolds's corps to meet the flank
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Seymour, Truman 1824-1891 (search)
y officer; born in Burlington, Vt., Sept. 24, 1824; graduated at West Point in 1846; served in the war against Mexico, and also in the Florida war (1856-58); and became captain of artillery in 1860. He was in Fort Sumter during its siege in 1861; joined the Army of the Potomac in March, 1862; and was made chief of artillery of McCall's division. Late in April of that year he was made brigadier-general, and commanded a brigade in the Peninsular campaign. He led a brigade in the battles at Groveton, South Mountain, and Antietam, and commanded a division in the assault on Fort Wagner, where he was severely wounded (July 18, 1863). In February, 1864, he commanded an expedition to Florida, and fought a battle at Olustee. He commanded divisions at the beginning of the Richmond campaign of 1864, and in the Shenandoah Valley the same year. He was in the Richmond campaign from December, 1864, to the surrender of Lee at Appomattox, and was brevetted majorgeneral, United States army, for ser
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- (search)
Torbet, Alfred Thomas Archimedes 1833- Military officer; born in Georgetown, Del., July 1, 1833; graduated at West Point in 1855, serving in Florida in 1856-57. He became colonel of the 1st New Jersey Volunteers in September, 1861, and was active in the Peninsular campaign. He commanded a brigade in the battles of Groveton, or second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain (where he was wounded), and Antietam. In November, 1862, he was promoted brigadier-general of volunteers; was engaged at Gettysburg; and commanded a division of cavalry in the Army of the Potomac from May to July, 1864. He was chief of cavalry in the Shenandoah campaign from August to October, 1864. and was brevetted major-general, United States army, in March, 1865. He resigned in October, 1866, and in 1871 was sent as consul-general to Havana. He was drowned in the wreck of the steamer Vera Cruz off the coast of Florida, Sept. 30, 1880.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), United States of America. (search)
invade Kentucky, crossing the Tennessee River at Harrison above Chattanooga......Aug. 21-24, 1862 Secretary of War directs the military governor of the coast islands of South Carolina to enlist 5,000 volunteers of African descent......Aug. 25, 1862 [The first permission by the government to employ negroes as soldiers.] Battle of Groveton, Va., between the advance of General Lee's army and General Pope......Aug. 29, 1862 Battle of Manassas, or second Bull Run, a continuation of Groveton......Aug. 30, 1862 Kirby Smith, with Bragg's right, advances on Richmond, Ky., and defeats the Union forces......Aug. 30, 1862 Battle of Chantilly, Va......Sept. 1, 1862 General Pope asks to be relieved from his command of the Army of Virginia, and transferred to the Department of the Northwest......Sept. 3, 1862 Joseph Holt, of Kentucky, appointed judge-advocate-general of the United States......Sept. 3, 1862 Confederate forces cross the Potomac and occupy Frederick City, Md