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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
t in a gap in rear of the division by order of Lieutenant-General Lee, and while being posted there I moved the balance of my brigade to attack the enemy, who was approaching the road between us and Franklin. I drove him back very easily, and was moving to the road again, when I was informed by a staff officer of Lieutenant-General Lee, Lieutenant Farish, that Colonel Hunter and his detachment had been captured. I was again placed in position in an earthwork a thousand yards from Harpeth river, and, before any instructions reached me, our cavalry stampeded. The enemy, five thousand strong, charged in three columns with squadrons covering the intervening ground and connecting them-one in front, one in rear upon the left flank, and one in rear upon the right flank. I found a section of artillery upon the road and a part of a regiment of infantry, under Colonel Hundly. I had the section to open upon the enemy, but it had no effect, except to increase the speed of his flanking
March 4. The First East-Tennessee cavalry, Colonel Johnson, had a fight with a party of rebels led by Colonel Rogers, at a point on Harpeth River, near Chapel Hill, Tenn.; killed twelve, and captured seventy-two of the rebels, with all their horses and accoutrements. Majors Burkhart and Macy were in command of the National cavalry, all of whom passed through the engagement without injury.--The Thirty-seventh Congress of the United States terminated.--The sloop Ida was captured near Charlotte Harbor, Fla., by the blockading schooner James S. Chambers.--The Second New Hampshire regiment returned to Concord. A skirmish took place at Skeet, N. C., between a scouting detachment of National troops under the command of Captain Richardson, of the Third New York cavalry, and a party of rebel guerrillas, in which the latter were routed and dispersed. The Union party then advanced to Swan Quarter, where they encountered a superior body of rebels, but after a sharp fight of twenty m
Seventh Kentucky cavalry, over the river, and keep the enemy from obtaining possession of the town. The boys went in with a yell, and the battalions, severally commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Vimont, and Majors Bradley and Collier, succeeded in repulsing the enemy at every point, and for some three hours held the town against every odds brought to bear against it. After the enemy commenced sweeping the streets of the town with round shot and grape, the Seventh only retired to the north of Harpeth, after being repeatedly ordered to do so by the post commandant. Some of the most brilliant cavalry exploits it has ever been my lot to witness were performed by these gallant Kentuckians during this unequal contest. Infantry officers who carefully watched every movement from the fort with glasses, describe the conduct of the Seventh Kentucky as deserving of all praise. When it became apparent that the enemy was massing his forces to make an irresistible dash upon Colonel Faulkner and
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 9.64 (search)
eemed to me I had exhausted every means in the power of one man to remove this stumbling-block to the Army of Tennessee. On the morning of the 30th of November, Lee was on the march up the Franklin pike, when the main body of the army, at Spring Hill, awoke to find the Federals had disappeared. I hereupon decided, before the enemy would be able to reach his stronghold at Nashville, to make that same afternoon another and final effort to overtake and rout him, and drive him into the Big Harpeth River at Franklin, since I could no longer hope to get between him and Nashville, by reason of the short distance from Franklin to that city, and the advantage which the Federals enjoyed in the possession of the direct road. At early dawn the troops were put in motion in the direction of Franklin, marching as rapidly as possible to overtake the enemy before he crossed the Big Harpeth, eighteen miles from Spring Hill. Lieutenant-General Lee had crossed Duck River after dark the night prev
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Repelling Hood's invasion of Tennessee. (search)
nside the intrenchments. On Strickland's left, close to the Columbia Pike, was posted one of the new infantry regiments. The tremendous onset, the wild yells, the whole infernal din of the strife, were too much for such an undisciplined body. As they saw their comrades from the advance line rushing to the rear, they too turned and fled. The contagion spread, and in a few minutes a disorderly stream was pouring down the pike past the Carter house toward Bridge at Franklin over the Harpeth River, looking up-stream. The left of the picture, is the north bank of the stream; Franklin is upon the south bank. Fort Granger, where General Schofield had his headquarters, occupied the site of the buildings on the north bank. the town. The guns, posted on each side the Columbia Pike, were abandoned, and the works, for the space of more than a regimental front, both east and west of the pike, were deserted. Into the gap thus made, without an instant's delay, swarmed the jubilant Con
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Union cavalry in the Hood campaign. (search)
emy's determined advance and that I should therefore concentrate the cavalry that night on the Lewisburg turnpike near Rally Hill, so as to prevent the enemy from occupying that highway and marching rapidly to Franklin, at the crossing of the Harpeth River, and also at the junction of the Lewisburg and the Columbia turnpikes. I assumed, as a matter of course, that Schofield would fall back on the last-mentioned turnpike, and that this arrangement would force the enemy to advance slowly and witistently dwarfed or neglected altogether by historians. Simultaneously with Hood's infantry assault, his cavalry under Chalmers advanced to the attack, driving back Croxton and his pickets from the Lewisburg turnpike to the north side of the Harpeth River, where Hatch, Johnson, and Harrison's troopers had been disposed so as to cover and watch the fords and protect the left and rear of Schofield's army. Realizing the importance of holding this position, as soon as the rebel cavalrymen had mad
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
the latter was himself. Hall's loss was fifty-five men, of whom only six were killed. Early in April, General Gordon Granger, then in command at Franklin, with nearly five thousand troops, was satisfied that a heavy force under Van Dorn was about to attack him. He was then constructing a fort (which afterward bore his name), but only two siege-guns and two rifled cannon, belonging to an Ohio battery, were mounted upon it. The fort was on a commanding hill on the northern side of the Harpeth River, about fifty feet above that stream, and completely commanded the approaches to Franklin. Granger's infantry and artillery were under the immediate command of General's Baird and Gilbert, and his cavalry wac led by Generals G. C. Smith and Stanley. Every precaution was taken to be ready for the foe, from whatever point he might approach. Baird was directed to oppose his crossing at the fords below Franklin, and Gilbert was placed so as to meet an attack in front, or to re-enforce eithe
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
y pressed after the day dawned. Hour after hour skirmishing went on, while the patriots gradually moved northward. during that day and night, and early the following morning Nov. 30, 1864. they were in a strong position at Franklin, on the Harpeth River, where some stirring events had occurred the previous year. See page 118. There Schofield halted on the southern edge of the village, in order that his trains, then choking the road for miles, might be taken across the Harpeth and put wellhand. Schofield's Headquarters. Schofield's Headquarters were at the house of Dr. D. B. Cliffe, on main Street, in the village of Franklin. That village was the capital of Williamson County, Tennessee, and was situated in a bend of the Harpeth River, which formed two sides of a square, with a sharp curve at the angle, as seen in the map on page 421. Schofield was satisfied that his foes were concentrated directly in his rear; for his cavalry, following the Lewisburg pike several mil
ith entire success: he attained the object of the demonstration, which was to keep the Federals in ignorance of our movements till sufficient time had been allowed the Army to reach the desired point. Colonel Beckham, chief of artillery in Lee's Corps, and one of the most promising officers of his rank, was unfortunately killed on the 29th, during the heavy cannonade in front of that town. On the morning of the 30th of November, Lee was on the march up the Franklin pike, when the main body of the Army, at Spring Hill, awoke to find the Federals had disappeared. I hereupon decided, before the enemy would be able to reach his stronghold at Nashville, to make that same afternoon another and final effort to overtake and rout him, and drive him in the Big Harpeth river at Franklin, since I could no longer hope to get between him and Nashville, by reason of the short distance from Franklin to that city, and the advantage which the Federals enjoyed in the possession of the direct road.
ther flank, the main body of the cavalry on the right under Forrest. Johnston's Division of Lee's Corps also became engaged on the left during the engagement. The line advanced at 4 p. m., with orders to drive the enemy into or across the Big Harpeth river, while General Forrest, if successful, was to cross the river and attack and destroy his trains and broken columns. The troops moved forward most gallantly to the attack. We carried the enemy's first line of hastily constructed works handly in the morning, and which materially checked his movements, enabled us to reach Franklin with but little difficulty. There the enemy appeared in considerable force and exhibited great boldness; but he was repulsed, and the crossing of the Harpeth river effected. I found that there was in the town of Franklin a large number of our own and of the enemy's wounded, and not wishing to subject them and the town to the fire of the enemy's artillery, the place was yielded with but little resistanc
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