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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 3 1 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
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do not doubt his fighting qualities. It is safe, therefore, to predict that the enemy will be obliged to fight very shortly, or retreat from their camp on Elk Creek. General Cooper would not likely be able to hold his present position undisturbed many days longer, even if General Blunt were not on the way to Gibson, for, as I have already stated, we had reasons for believing that it was the intention of Colonel Phillips, as soon as the force which he has sent to this point, or perhaps to Horse Creek, twenty miles further north, with the train, returns, to cross the Arkansas, and attack General Cooper in his camp. Those who have been with Colonel Phillips will believe that he should have control of whatever movement is made against the enemy, and that to him should belong the praise or blame of its success or failure. But that he would be able to rout the enemy, there can be scarcely a shadow of doubt. If General Blunt goes on now to Gibson, and takes the troops there, and attacks
m W. Lunt, lately a private belonging to the Ninth regiment of Maine volunteers, was executed at Hilton Head, S. C., for desertion.--The National cavalry, belonging to the army of General Grant, under the command of Colonel Lee, took possession of the rebel forts on the Tallahatchie River. By a sudden descent, early in the morning, Colonel Lee captured a battery of six guns, with the horses attached thereto, on the north side of the river.--A slight skirmish took place in the vicinity of Horse Creek, Dade County, Mo., between a detachment of the Fourth Missouri cavalry, under the command of Major Kelly, and a small band of guerrillas, in which the rebels were routed, leaving five of their number in the hands of the Unionists.--Springfield Missourian. A detachment of the Third Virginia National cavalry, under the command of Captain S. B. Cruger, entered Warrenton, Va., to-day, after routing the rebel cavalry, and capturing one prisoner, nine horses, and a wagon, without any Union
of Louisville. Between the Oconee and Ogeechee, the roads, excepting at the river and swamp crossings, were good, the country very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to
of Louisville. Between the Oconee and Ogeechee, the roads, excepting at the river and swamp crossings, were good, the country very level, and the weather, during the march, superb. Supplies of all kinds were very abundant. From the first to the eighth of December, our line of march was down the Peninsula between the Ogeechee and Savannah Rivers, following the Louisville and Savannah Road, encamping on the first on Baker's Creek; on the second, at Buckhead Church; on the third, at Horse Creek; on the fourth, at Little Ogeechee; on the fifth, at Sylvania Cross-Roads; on the sixth, near Cowpens Creek; on the seventh, on Jack's Branch, near Springfield; and on the eighth, near Eden Cross-Roads. As we approached the coast, the surface of the country became flat and swampy. Large ponds or pools were met every mile or so, and the creeks spread out into several miry branches. The roads between the creeks and ponds, though apparently of sand, and substantial character, proved to
, at six A. M. Travelled about fourteen miles, and encamped near Horse Creek at four P. M. December fourth, started this morning at six o'cloction of this road, my command pressed forward and encamped near Horse Creek at forty-five minutes past four P. M. The distance marched on thhed the camp of the division three and a half (3 1/2) miles from Horse Creek, at half-past 6 A. M., December fourth. Distance marched, fourt) miles. December 4th.--Marched at nine A. M. During the day, Horse Creek and Crooked Creek were crossed. Distance marched, ten (10) mile M., marching across a large swamp, and halted one (1) mile from Horse Creek, at eight P. M., after marching eight (8) miles without incidentguard. 4th. Moved at half-past 10 A. M., and bivouacked near Horse Creek. 5th. Moved at daylight, and crossed Horse Creek. Division Horse Creek. Division still rear-guard. 6th. Regiment detailed to forage for brigade. 7th. Regiment still on duty foraging for brigade. Rejoined same near
on Ten and a Half. Tore up rail road to bridge over Ogeechee River, and 30th. Burned the bridge, and then marched to Louisville, via Watkins's Bridge, reaching camp of division at twelve P. M. December 1.--Moved at eight A. M., and camped beyond Birdsville. 2d. Moved at six A. M. toward Millen. Camped at Buckhead Creek. 3d. Moved at ten A. M., crossed Augusta and Millen Railroad; camped six miles beyond, on the Sylvania road. 4th. Moved at half-past 7 A. M.; camped at Horse Creek. 5th. Marched fourteen miles and camped, leaving Sylvania to our left. 6th. Continued the march toward Springfield; roads very soft and marshy. Camped after a tedious march of six miles. 7th. Still continued the march toward Springfield, and camped for the night near it. 8th. Passed Springfield and marched twelve miles, camping near Zion's Church. 9th. Moved at ten A. M., and struck Savannah road. First division, Twentieth army corps, on our front, skirmished with the
enemy, I deemed it best to cross near Spurgeon's mill, and camped for the night a few miles below. Moving early next morning, the command halted at Easly's, on Horse Creek, five miles from Kingsport, and fed the horses. From this point I communicated with Colonel Giltner, near noon, my intention to execute the original plan of at the north fork of Holston, and attack at Rogersville at daylight on the morning of Friday, the sixth instant. Brigadier-General W. E. Jones will proceed by the Horse Creek and Beach Creek Valley roads and attack simultaneously with you. Your march, after getting across the North Fork, should be rapid, and in the night. You can go. You will please collect your brigade, throwing a force in the direction of Jonesboroa, and with the greater part proceed to Rogersville by a route leading up Horse Creek and down Beach Creek Valleys, across the Holston at one of the fords near Rogersville, and attack at daylight on Friday morning, the sixth instant. You will co
and September 18 (Co. B ). Near Fort Cottonwood September 20. Detachment of Company C. Operations against Indians in Nebraska and Colorado Territories September 29-November 30 (1st Battalion). Cow Creek near Fort Zarah December 4 (Detachment). Julesburg, Indian Territory, January 7, 1865 (Co. F ). Rush Creek February 8 (Co. D ). Mud Springs February 8-9. Rush Creek February 9. Boyd's Station June 3 (Co. E ). Cow Creek Station, Kansas, June 12 (Co. G ). Horse Creek, Dakota Ter., June 14 (Cos. B and D ). Tongue River August 29 (Co. F ). Duty on the plains till June, 1866. Mustered out June 22, 1866. Killed and mortally wounded 1 Officer 29 Enlisted men; by disease 1 Officer 93 Enlisted men. Total 124. 8th Iowa Regiment Cavalry Organized at Davenport September 30, 1863. Moved to Chattanooga, Tenn., October 17-22, thence to Nashville, Tenn., November 14-16. Attached to Defenses of Nashville & Northwestern Railroad, Dept. of th
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Missouri Volunteers. (search)
d march to Springfield July 27-31. Pursuit of Coffee, Garden Hollow, near Pineville, August 9. Pineville August 13. March to Bentonville, Ark.; Fort Gibson C. N. and Honey Springs, and join Gen. Blount. Blount's Campaign in Indian Nation and Arkansas August and September. Perryville August 26. Scullyville, Ark., August 30-31. Devil's Back Bone September 1. Capture of Fort Smith September 1. Expedition to Big Lake. Mississippi County September 7-30 (Detachment). Horse Creek September 17. March to Springfield, Mo., arriving September 18. Operations against Shelby and pursuit to Arkansas River September 22-October 26. Carthage October 2. Neosho October 4 (3 Cos.). Humansville October 16-17. Bloomfield October 22 (Cos. A, D, E, K, L ). Harrisonville October 24. Buffalo Mountain October 24. Expedition from Springfield to Huntsville and skirmish November 8-18 (Detachment). Expedition from Springfield to Howell, Wright and Oregon Cou
2nd Division Cavalry, 23rd Army Corps, to February, 1864. Columbus, Ohio, to April, 1864. Cavalry, 9th Army Corps, Army of the Potomac, to May 24, 1864. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, and Middle Military Division, to May, 1865. Dept. of Missouri to October, 1865. Service. Expedition to Fort Scott, Kan., February 18-March 2, 1862. Action at Independence, Mo., February 22. Expedition to Diamond Grove, Kan., April 15-May 7. Action at Horse Creek May 7. Expedition into Indian Territory May 25-July 8. Action at Grand River June 6. Capture of Fort Gibson July 18. Bayou Bernard July 27. Montevallo August 5. Lone Jack, Mo., August 11. Blount's Campaign in Missouri and Arkansas September 17-December 3. Expedition to Sarcoxie September 28-30. Newtonia September 30. Occupation of Newtonia October 4. Skirmishes at Carthage, Cow Hill, Cow Skin Prairie, Wolf Creek, Maysville and White River. Ordered to Co
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