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veral gallant efforts, to rally their troops and keep back the onrushing heroes of Stone's River and Bull Run. The broken mass fled in confusion toward Chattanooga, carrying with it McCook, Crittenden, and Rosecrans. The latter telegraphed to Washington that his army had been beaten. In this famous charge the Confederates took several thousand prisoners and forty pieces of artillery. Flushed with victory, the Confederates now concentrated their attack upon Thomas, who thus far, on Horseshoe Ridge and its spurs, had repelled all attempts to dislodge him. The Confederates, smith victory within their grasp, and led by the indomitable Longstreet, swarmed up the slopes in great numbers, but they were hurled back with fearful slaughter. Thomas was looking anxiously for Sheridan, whom, as he knew, Rosecrans had ordered with two brigades to his support. Where the lines were swept back Lee & Gordon's mill, seen in the picture, marked the extreme right of the Federal line on the s
, but the artillery again came to the rescue, and, after dark, the Confederates were repulsed, and the first day's conflict ended as a drawn battle. On the morning of the second day, the attack was made on the Federal left by Polk, but Thomas had entrenched his men and batteries, and the tremendous efforts to dislodge him were repulsed by a storm of musketry and canister, and the attacks failed. After the Federal right was pushed off the field and the conflict raged around Thomas on Horseshoe Ridge, the artillerv of Thomas' command created havoc in the ranks of the assaulting columns. As the final attacks were made the ammunition was exhausted, and, in their turn, the infantry saved the artillery by receiving the foe with cold steel. That night The about-faced redoubt three days after its capture by the federals A photograph of June 21, 1864--three days after Cowan's Battery captured this work and turned it against its Confederate builders. When the Eighteenth Army Corps
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
izations on both sides in that battle came out of it with a loss of every other man who entered it killed or wounded. The assaults on the Confederate side were without parallel in the war. Longstreet's charge at Gettysburg was a single effort. But Longstreet's entire wing at Chickamauga assaulted time and again on far more difficult ground than the slopes of Cemetery Hill. There were three general assaults which each deserve to rank with Pickett's charge, while the Union defence of Horseshoe Ridge is without parallel in the war. So thin a line of heroes never before successfully withstood such tremendous assaults. Of the whole battle, from opening to close, there was never truer thing written than General Hindman's words in regard to his conflict with Granger's troops: I have never known Federal troops to fight so well. It is just to say, also, that I never saw Confederate soldiers fight better. And Kershaw, of Longstreet's Virginia troops, who had seen all the fighting in the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.36 (search)
izations on both sides in that battle came out of it with a loss of every other man who entered it killed or wounded. The assaults on the Confederate side were without parallel in the war. Longstreet's charge at Gettysburg was a single effort. But Longstreet's entire wing at Chickamauga assaulted time and again on far more difficult ground than the slopes of Cemetery Hill. There were three general assaults which each deserve to rank with Pickett's charge, while the Union defence of Horseshoe Ridge is without parallel in the war. So thin a line of heroes never before successfully withstood such tremendous assaults. Of the whole battle, from opening to close, there was never truer thing written than General Hindman's words in regard to his conflict with Granger's troops: I have never known Federal troops to fight so well. It is just to say, also, that I never saw Confederate soldiers fight better. And Kershaw, of Longstreet's Virginia troops, who had seen all the fighting in the
X., 40, 169, 161, 168, 169. Hoover Gap, Tenn., II., 340. Hopkins, A., VI., 310. Hopkins, G., VII., 318. Hopkins, O., I., 105. Horner, C. F., X., 2. Hornet's Nest, Shiloh, Tenn., I., 202, 206, 209. Horse Shoe Bend, Ky., II., 334. Horse artillery V., 33. Horses: (see also Cavalry) sentry guarding feed for Federal, 1864, IV., 67; killed in battle. IV., 105 seq.; types of, for which the Northern States were ransacked, IV., 313, 315. Horseshoe Ridge, Ga., II., 284. Hospitals: camp near Washington, D. C., VII., 15; construction, good type of, developed during the war, VII., 215; on the firing-line, VII., 229; nearest the fiercest fighting, VII., 233; field and temporary, VII., 256 seq.; field, VII., 256-272; two of the first field, VII.; 257; emergency carriage-and wagon-shops converted into, VII., 258; spring vehicles serving as, VII., 258; work in a farm-house, June, 1862, VII., 261; tents, value of, recognized in April, 186
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book I:—eastern Tennessee. (search)
is brigade, extends Harker's right toward Horseshoe Ridge, upon which, as we shall presently show, en two fires, falls back in good order on Horseshoe Ridge, which is, as we have already said, a few under the eyes of the Federals posted on Horseshoe Ridge. Leaving in reserve MeNair's brigade, whm at a distance, on the eastern slopes of Horseshoe Ridge, facing Kelly's fields, so as to check th hasty retreat. The combined attack on Horseshoe Ridge has not lasted longer than a quarter of aitself and to ascend the western side of Horseshoe Ridge, so as to open an oblique fire on the reaeyond the ravine which bounds the foot of Horseshoe Ridge. The rout of Johnson's division is complon the southern slope of the extremity of Horseshoe Ridge. He clears the line formed by the brigadme when Preston redoubles his assaults on Horseshoe Ridge, and the conflict is thus started simultae, while the right, holding its ground on Horseshoe Ridge, shall prevent Longstreet from interferin[14 more...]