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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 18 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 10 (search)
the Tennessee advanced along the Augusta railroad to within about three and a half miles of Atlanta, where the enemy was found intrenched. The Army of the Ohio moved along the road leading from Judge Peyton's to Atlanta, and soon encountered the enemy intrenched. The Army of the Cumberland crossed Peach Tree Creek at several points, and the left of it (Fourth Corps), connecting with the Army of the Ohio, met the same obstacle. The Fourteenth Corps, on the extreme right, moving on the Howell's Mill road, joined the Twentieth Corps on its left, and this, in turn, joined Newton's division,of the Fourth Corps, which was moving on the Collier's Mill road. There was no communication on the south side of Peach Tree Creek between Newton's and the other divisions of the Fourth Corps. This was the status when two rebel corps moving down the Howell's Mill road and Collier's Mill road attacked the Twentieth Corps, together with the left division of the Fourteenth Corps and Newton's division
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 97 (search)
ey were relieved and moved back. Here they went into camp and remained until the 17th of July. On the 17th July they crossed the Chattahoochee and marched about a mile beyond. On the 18th they moved across Nancy's Creek, driving the enemy's skirmishers from their works. The regiment had 1 man slightly wounded. On the evening of the 19th July they moved to the right and bivouacked on the north bank of Peach Tree Creek. On the morning of the 20th July they crossed Peach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill and marched out on the Atlanta road about a mile, where the line was formed, the One hundred and fourth on the left of first line; then Fifteenth Kentucky, Forty-second and Eighty-eighth Indiana on the right. The right of the One hundred and fourth was about 125 yards in advance of the left of the Fifteenth Kentucky, they being on a ridge to the rear, a ravine between us. The left of the regiment connected with troops of Twentieth Corps. The regiment was ordered to erect works, but had
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 116 (search)
a few hundred yards and formed line of battle to the left of the road. Threw out skirmishers in front and on the left flank. Moved forward, skirmishing with the enemy's cavalry until the skirmishers reached Nancy's Creek. July 18, moved forward, driving the enemy's mounted infantry, from time to time during the day, from temporary defenses, and finally across Peach Tree Creek, on the banks of which the line rested for the night. On the night of the 19th crossed Peach Tree Creek at Howell's Mill. July 20, at daylight moved to the left of the road and formed line of battle, leaving sufficient space for the First Brigade to form between my right and the road, its right resting upon the road and connecting with the left of the Third Division, Fourteenth Army Corps. Skirmishers being thrown forward, I advanced through woods, skirmishing, some 300 yards, when I was directed to halt and fortify my position. While doing this a portion of the Twentieth Army Corps came up on my lef
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 127 (search)
ich a part of General Johnson's skirmishers took part, with his cavalry dismounted, drove them to and across Nancy's Creek. The troops here bivouacked for the night. On the morning of the 18th Dilworth's brigade joined the division, moving from its previous camp before daylight, and took the advance of the column. Little resistance was offered by the enemy to our advance during the day, and before night I was able to report my troops in camp on Peach Tree Creek, a short distance below Howell's Mill, picketing the bank from my front to its mouth. On the 19th, in compliance with verbal instructions from Major-General Thomas, I ordered Dilworth to move his brigade to the mouth of Green Bone Creek in search of a crossing said to exist there. A point over which troops could be passed was found; it was also found strongly picketed by the enemy. Dilworth was ordered to drive these away, and to effect a lodgment of his troops on the opposite bank, if possible. This, after a severe skir
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 144 (search)
the remainder to camp. On the afternoon of this day the brigade moved on the Atlanta road and went into camp on the right and within one mile of the railroad bridge, where it remained, doing picket and guard duty, until the morning of the 18th of July, on which day we crossed the Chattahoochee on pontoon bridge at Pace's Ferry, five miles above railroad bridge. On the same day we crossed Nancy's Creek and advanced skirmishers from Twenty-second Indiana as far as Peach Tree Creek, near Howell's Mill. The brigade bivouacked for the night on the Atlanta and Pace's Ferry road. As the 19th of July was an eventful day in the history of this brigade, I choose to incorporate in this report the minutes made by Colonel Dilworth at the time: This morning I was ordered to form my lines in< rear of skirmish line and push across the Peach Tree Creek. This was done by placing the Fifty-second Ohio in advance, crossing the creek on a log and moving out across the field and on the hill. Her
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day was spent in reconnoitering the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being destroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell'sHowell's Mill, the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the ground admitted of such easy defense that to have forced a passage must have been hazardous and attended with much loss. In the afternoon, however, the Second Division succeeded in getting over lower down, and I, being in reserve, sent my First Brigade to cross with it. I had at first been directed by Major-General Thomas to cross my division at that place, but o
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Resaca. (search)
the Fourth Corps from above having cleared the opposite shore, we crossed the river, the First and Second Divisions preceding mine. July 18, the corps advanced, passing Nancy's Creek at Kyle's Ferry, and encamped at night with our advance at Howell's Mill, on Peach Tree Creek, the Twentieth Corps being a little above us on our left. July 19, most of the day was spent in reconnoitering the creek, which was deep, and, the bridges being destroyed, the passage was difficult. In front of Howell'sHowell's Mill, the point occupied by the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, the crossing was strongly disputed, and the character of the ground admitted of such easy defense that to have forced a passage must have been hazardous and attended with much loss. In the afternoon, however, the Second Division succeeded in getting over lower down, and I, being in reserve, sent my First Brigade to cross with it. I had at first been directed by Major-General Thomas to cross my division at that place, but o