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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the Third winter. (search)
oon overtaken by Sully and compelled to fight, they defended themselves with unusual stubbornness, but finally were put to flight, and availed themselves of the night to disperse. This fight, called the White Stone Hill fight, cost the whites twenty dead and thirty-eight wounded. They destroyed the camp, comprising three hundred tents and containing an immense amount of provisions, such as over four hundred thousand pounds of dried buffalo meat, and all the booty carried away from Minnesota in the preceding year. The defeat of the Indians was complete; the unfavorable season was approaching; Sully, satisfied with his success, turned back, reached the Missouri, and moved down its left bank. The campaign was ended. On the east of the Rocky Mountains, in Idaho Territory, a post called Fort Halleck had been attacked by some Indians of the Ute tribe on the 21st of July, but the garrison, composed of two companies of Kansas volunteers, had repulsed them after a pretty brisk fight.