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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 42 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 4 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for Kettle Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) or search for Kettle Run, Va. (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
ring the narrow roads of the country: all are marching with the constant thought of a sudden attack. In this manner the army moves over a great distance without halting. The Sixth corps, which leads the advance on the right, has passed beyond Kettle Run, after having marched over thirty miles during the last twenty-four hours; the two corps which follow are moving en ├ęchelon; the Third has arrived at Greenwich at ten o'clock in the evening; the Second, which has left Fayetteville very late, a high chimneys blackened by fire. On the north-east are the plains of Manassas, untimbered and bordered only by a skirt of wood four or five hundred yards in width which commands the rather rugged slopes of the left bank. The railroad crosses Kettle Run two miles south-west of the Bristoe viaduct. The ground which separates the two streams is rather uneven. Woody along the railroad, which cuts it in a straight line from the southwest to the north-east, it is cultivated on the north-west in t