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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), My comrades of the army of Northern Virginia, (search)
ed by his fellow-soldiers and patriots. But he thought that the enviable honor should not be monopolized by one man, and he hoped that it would now be conferred upon some one among the many worthy then present. On motion of Hon. George L. Christian, it was— Resolved, That Comrade Carlton McCarthy be appointed a committee of one to solicit subscriptions in sums of one dollar or less for a monument to the private soldiers of the Confederate States Army, said monument to be erected on Libby Hill. The committee on the nomination of officers returning, reported the following, who were unanimously elected: President, General William H. Payne, of Fauquier county; Vice-Presidents, General John R. Cooke, of Richmond city; Colonel Charles Marshall, of Baltimore, Maryland; Hon. James H. Skinner, of Staunton; Captain Philip W. McKinney, of Farmville; General Thomas T. Munford, of Richmond city; Treasurer, Robert S. Bosher, Esq., of Richmond city; Secretary, Private Carlton Mc-Carthy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 16. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
30, 58, 67, 83, 107, 112, 129, 203, 261, 274, 385, 358, 395; Letter of, 228. Lee, Richard Henry, 429. Lee, Gen. Stephen D., 88, 166, 274, 373. Lee Camp Soldiers' Home, 194. Lee's Memoirs, cited, 9. Legare, 104. Legare, E. T., 395. Lesemann, F. W., 395 Lesesne, Lt., Charles, 174. Lesesne, Lt. F. J., 137, 143, 155, 165,68; killed, 191, 193. Letcher, Gov., John, 84. Lewis, Col., 114. Lewis, Hon. D. P., 275. Lexington, Va., in 1861, 37. Libby, Jr., Dr. Robert, 151. Libby Hill, monument, Richmond, 296. Lincoln, A., 320; on secession, 322, 433 Lindsay, Lt. A. J., 92. Lindsay, Lt. H. C., 92. Little Run Guards, 15. Live's Battery, 59 Logan, Lt., Calhoun, 116, 132. Logan, Col. John A., 77. Logwood, Col. T. H., 71,73. Lomax, Gen. L. L.,453. Long, Gen. A. L., 268. Long Island, S. C., 135. Longstreet, Gen James, 103, 108, 274. Lookout Mountain, Battle of, 386. Looney, Col., 303. Loring, Alonzo, 83. Loring, Gen. W. W.,89, 90. Lost Cause Vind
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Monument to General Robert E. Lee. (search)
olding a wreath of laurel over the head of a Confederate soldier who is seated at her feet. The standing figure was intended for an impersonation of the South. These suggestions Mons. Mercie soon elaborated into a beautiful group. Let us hope that for the want of a few thousand dollars, this noble monument of General Lee will not be left in an unfinished state, as it must be while it lacks the two groups of sculpture which formed a part of the original design. Discussing the site. Libby Hill, Gamble's Hill, and the Allen lot, in the western part of the city, were successively discussed and voted on as the site of the statue. The Allen lot was at last chosen and accepted as the gift of Mr. Otway S. Allen, by the following resolution: June 18th, 1887. Resolved, That in view of the original advantages of the location, the donation of Mr. Otway S. Allen, heirs and devisees, of the circle of 100 feet, radius as the monument site, and especially in consideration of the surrou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. (search)
the statue of General Ambrose Powell Hill at Richmond, Virginia, May 30, 1892. With the Oration of General James A. Walker on the occasion. [From the Richmond Dispatch, May 31, 1892.] Richmond is a city of memories and it must also be a city of monuments; monuments which entwine our hearts with the past and pledge us to a patriotic future. We have now a monument in Oakwood cemetary to the sixteen thousand dead buried there; a granite column (nearly finished) in Marshall Park (Libby Hill) to all of the soldiers and sailors of the Confederacy; a statue to Stonewall Jackson in the Capitol Square; a granite pyramidal pile to the twelve thousand Confederate dead in Hollywood, and in the same cemetary monuments over the graves of Pickett, Stuart, Maury and others; a statue of Wickham in Monroe Park, and an equestrian statue of Lee at the west end of Franklin street. Our duty in this respect to A. P. Hill is also done, and movements are on foot to do like honor to President Davi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.9 (search)
d ownership. The monument should be carried not alone upon the shoulders of the infantry, artillery, cavalry, engineers and sailors of the Confederacy, but should be urged forward by the hearts and hands of the whole South. And wherever a northern man has a southern wife (and a good many northern men of taste have them) let him help, too, for God never gave him a nobler or richer blessing. The place for such a monument, it seems to me, should be by the side of the Confederate soldier on Libby Hill. It is not well for a man to be alone, nor woman either. To place her elsewhere would make a perpetual stag of him, and a perpetual wall-flower of her. Companions in glory and suffering; let them go down the corridors of time side by side, the representatives of a race of heroes and heroines. It has been truly said by Guizot in his history of civilization that as the women of a nation are elevated so the nation is elevated, and that the social and moral condition of woman measures the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
gathered where the parade assembled, but as soon as the column moved, scattered for other points to get a second sight of the inspiring pageant. Many turned to Libby Hill, and from the escarpment just under the monument obtained a magnificent vista view of the procession as it approached down Main street with its fluttering bannethan 2,000 girls and boys—a regiment of each—adorned with Confederate colors, and many of whom assisted in drawing the figure for the monument from the depot to Libby Hill. In this contingent of juveniles were the boys from the Masonic Orphan Asylum, those from the Richmond Orphan Asylum, the lads from the Young Men's Christian Aoment, caused many persons, thousands, perhaps, to return to their homes after viewing the parade on either Broad or Main street, there was no lack of people on Libby Hill when the head of the procession reached that beautiful spot. There were not many people on the grand stand, a majority of the tickets for which were held by
100 Dollars reward. --The above reward will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me of my servant girl, Francis, who ran off about the 15th January last. Francis is about 17 years of age, gingerbread color, well grown, and has a full head of hair. Her front teeth are somewhat decayed and wide apart. She was owned and raised at or near Louisa C. H. I purchased her in January last, of a Mr. Hayden. She is supposed to be still in this city, or she may have gotten back to Louisa, where she has relatives. A. W. Taylor, cor 29th and Main sts, Libby Hill. mh 18--1t
100 dollars reward --Will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me of my servant girl Frances, who ran off in January last, she is 17 years of age, about 5 feet 6 inches in height, mulatto, has a full suit of hair, her front teeth wide apart. She was raised in Louisa county. I have reason to think she is harbored in this city. A W Taylor. Libby Hill. I have answered Mr J W Jones's communication through the Post-Office. jy 2--1t*
200 dollars reward --Will be paid for the apprehension and delivery to me of my servant girl Frances, who ran off in January last. She is 17 years of age, about 5 feet 6 inches in height, mulatto, has a full suit of hair, her front teeth wide apart. She was raised in Louisa county. A. W. Taylor, Libby Hill. jy 28--1t*