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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 16 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant. You can also browse the collection for Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 13 (search)
Butler in the angle between the James River and the Appomattox. A portion of Wilson's division of cavalry which had not accompanied Sheridan pushed forward to Long Bridge on the Chickahominy, fifteen miles below Cold Harbor. All the bridges on that river had been destroyed, and the cavalry had to dismount and wade across the mudout on the road to Jones's Bridge, twenty miles below Cold Harbor, and was followed by Wright. Cavalry covered the rear. Warren moved out some distance on the Long Bridge road, so as to watch the routes leading toward Richmond and hold the bridge across the White Oak Swamp. He was to make demonstrations which were intended to deonversation was so thoughtful, philosophical, and original that he fascinated all who listened to him. The next morning (June 13) the general made a halt at Long Bridge, where the head of Hancock's corps had arrived, and where he could be near Warren's movement and communicate promptly with him. That evening he reached Wilcox'
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 14 (search)
by Hancock and Warren, and more of the enemy's line was captured, but not permanently held. Telegrams sent by General Lee on June 17 show how completely mystified he was, even at that late day, in regard to Grant's movements. At 12 M. he sent a despatch to Beauregard, saying: Until I can get more definite information of Grant's movements, I do not think it prudent to draw more troops to this side of the river. At 1:45 P. M. he telegraphed: Warren's corps crossed the Chickahominy at Long Bridge on the 13th; . . . that night it marched to Westover. Some prisoners were taken from it on the 14th; have not heard of it since. At 4:30 he sent Beauregard another despatch, saying: Have no information of Grant's crossing the James River, but upon your report have ordered troops up to Chaffin's Bluff. Grant, on the contrary, had ascertained from watchers on Butler's tall signal-tower, which had been erected at Bermuda Hundred, just how many railway-trains with troops had passed toward