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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 50 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 22 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 16 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 16 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) or search for Long Bridge (Pennsylvania, United States) in all documents.

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two schooners laden with forage, and 14 wagons; capturing and taking off 165 prisoners, 260 mules and horses; halting three hours to rest at Talleysville, in the rear of our army; resuming his march at midnight; crossing the Chickahominy near Long Bridge, by hastily improvised bridges, next forenoon; and reaching Richmond unassailed next morning. This was the first of the notable cavalry raids of the war, tempting to many imitations, some of them brilliant in design and execution; some of theh Jefferson Davis, accompanied Longstreet's advance, at the head of his own and A. P. Hill's divisions; encountering no resistance until noon, when their advance descried our rear-guard, strongly posted upon the road leading from New Market to Long Bridge, and having a small branch of the White Oak Swamp creek in their front. Seeing that we were in force, Longstreet waited till 3 P. M. for the coming up of Huger, who was some 3 or 4 miles distant, on his right, or Jackson, who was still nearer
south of the James, Smith's corps was likewise embarked June 12-13. and returned to Butler; while the Army of the Potomac was put in motion June 12. for the passage of the James: Wilson's cavalry, in advance, crossing the Chickahominy at Long bridge, followed by Warren's corps; which was passed at Long bridge by Hancock's, which struck the James at Wilcox's wharf, between Charles City C. H. and Westover. Wright and Burnside, crossing the Chickahominy at Jones's bridge, moved thence to ChLong bridge by Hancock's, which struck the James at Wilcox's wharf, between Charles City C. H. and Westover. Wright and Burnside, crossing the Chickahominy at Jones's bridge, moved thence to Charles City C. H.; our trains, for safety, taking roads still farther to the east. The enemy made some attempts at annoying our right flank during the march, but to no purpose. Pontoons and ferry-boats being at hand, the passage was promptly and safely made; June 14-15. and very soon our guns were thundering at the southern approaches to the Rebel capital. This is not a military history, and its author makes no shadow of pretension to other military knowledge, than that which is necessa