hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 6 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.67 (search)
nteenth Corps leaving first, and the Fifteenth second. In the evening of May 9th I received, by telegraph, orders to proceed at once to Mississippi and take chief command of the forces there, and to arrange to take with me, for temporary service, or to have follow without delay, three thousand good troops. I replied instantly: Your dispatch of this morning received. I shall go immediately, although unfit for service, and took the first train, which was on the morning of the 10th. At Lake Station, on the 13th, I found a telegram from General Pemberton, dated the; 12th, informing me that the enemy was apparently moving in heavy force on Edwards's depot, which, as he said, will be the battle-field if I can carry forward sufficient force, leaving troops enough to secure the safety of this place [Vicksburg]. This was the first intelligence of the Federal army received from General Pemberton since the first of the month. I arrived in Jackson at nightfall, exhausted by an uninterrup
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
with the President and Secretary of War. move to the relief of General Pemberton. receive news of the fall of Vicksburg. army retires to Jackson. I set out for Mississippi on the first train that left Tullahoma, after the order of the Secretary of War was received. It was in the morning of the 10th of May. The intelligence of the assassination of the gallant Van Dorn had been received, and General Bragg and myself joined in recommending General Forrest as his successor. At Lake Station, in Mississippi, on the 13th, a dispatch from Lieutenant-General Pemberton, dated Vicksburg, May 12th, was sent to me from the telegraph-office. I was informed in it that the enemy is apparently moving in heavy force toward Edwards's Depot, on Southern Railroad. McClernand's Thirteenth Corps was apparently mistaken for the heavy force. With my limited force I will do all I can to meet him. That will be the battle-field, if I can carry forward sufficient force, leaving troops enough t
en out all night, making seven miles through the swamps. Thirteenth Iowa sent forward to support cavalry in a raid on Lake Station. Depot and road destroyed, also two locomotives and thirty cars. February twelfth, marched eighteen miles to Decatenty houses, on the tenth, and on the eleventh passed on toward Decatur. During the day, Foster's cavalry was sent to Lake Station, on the Southern railroad, where they destroyed three steam-mills, two locomotives, thirty-five cars, depot, and machihatever might benefit the rebellion. Among the places devastated were Enterprise, Marion, Quitman, Hillsboro, Canton, Lake Station, Decatur, Bolton, and Lauderdale Springs. At Enterprise, the depot, two flour-mills, fifteen thousand bushels of corn also burned. On the eleventh, Captain Foster, of the Tenth Missouri cavalry, received instructions to make a raid on Lake Station, seventeen miles from Hillsboro, and to destroy all property available for the rebels. Two livery-stables, several ma
ght artillery, via Oxford, to Okolona, to intercept the force of the enemy then at Newton Station, on the Southern Railroad. Captain Henderson, commanding special scouts at Grenada, was also instructed to send couriers to Generals Loring, Buford, and Ruggles, notifying those officers by telegrams from the nearest telegraph office, and advising each station on the road that the enemy had reached Newton, on the Southern road. A force was also ordered to proceed from Jackson to Forrest or Lake Station, or to such other points as circumstances might render necessary. Major-General Gardner, at Port Hudson, was notified that the enemy had reached the Southern Railroad; that it was probable he would endeavor to form a junction with Banks at Baton Rouge, and was instructed to send all his disposable cavalry to intercept him. Brigadier-General Featherstone, with his brigade, then at, or en route for, Winona, was ordered to move to Grenada, if there was any approach of the enemy (as was repo
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—the war in the South-West. (search)
. The Confederate infantry, on the other hand, was making a forced march to reach Meridian before the Federals, leaving to Lee, with only his cavalry, the care of holding them back by harassing their flanks. In this he succeeded, not owing to this intervention, but because the necessity of destroying the railroad slackened considerably the pace of the Unionists. Hence, after having separated from the line at Morton, McPherson, when at Hillsboroa, diverged from the main road to renew at Lake Station on this line his work of destruction. After having returned to take before Decatur the rest of Hurlbut's column, he had also to send to the south Force's brigade to disable Chunky Station. Lee, in spite of the activity of his officers and soldiers, had to content himself with capturing a few small detachments and a few wagons that had gone to forage too far away from the column. In the mean while he came near making a capture which would have been better for his cause than the greatest
Fatal railroad accident. --We learn from the Mobile papers that on the 5th inst., the camp on the Southern Railroad, three miles West of Lake Station, came in contact with a large or, in consequence of which four ears were thrown off the track, killing five and wounding sixteen men — all soldiers. Three of the killed belonged to the 5th Tennessee regiment. The names of the other two are not given.