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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 104 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 81 7 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 34 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 31 31 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 30 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 24 0 Browse Search
Heros von Borcke, Memoirs of the Confederate War for Independence 20 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 18 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 17 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington. You can also browse the collection for Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) or search for Marye's Heights (Virginia, United States) in all documents.

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Civil War. It shows the chances which a man takes when he enlists. The figures, however, are the result of the weapons and mode of fighting of twenty years ago. Since then, muzzle-loading rifles have been dispensed with. Still, in the Franco-Prussian war, in which the troops were armed with breech-loaders, there was no increase in the percentage of casualties. In fact, the old muzzleloaders loaders were capable of delivering a hotter fire than any body of troops could withstand. At Marye's Heights and Cemetery Ridge, the bravest of assaulting columns recoiled from their fire; breech-loaders could have done no more. There was a limit of punishment beyond which endurance would not go, and the old Springfield rifle was capable of inflicting it. But the figures of the Second Wisconsin, and of the other regiments as well, fail to show the full percentage of loss: the actual percentage was much larger. The figures given are based upon the total enrollment of the regiment, and nece
into action by each regiment, General Hancock was thoughtful enough in his report for Fredericksburg to specify the number present on the field in each regiment of his division. As the loss in Hancock's Division, in its memorable assault on Marye's Heights, was one of the severest of the war, it is given here in full. In addition to the official figures, the number of killed, as increased by those who died of their wounds, is also given — the number having been ascertained by examining the muPennsylvania 21 133 1 155 314 49.3 39 12.4   4th U. S. Artillery C 1 4 -- 5 -- -- -- -- Total 219 1,581 229 2,029 4,834 41.9 561 11.6 Nearly all the missing ones were killed or wounded men, who fell in front of the stone wall at Marye's Heights. Most of them belong with the killed, and were buried by the enemy. The number engaged may appear small; but it should be remembered that this division had already lost 3,290 men on the Peninsula and at Antietam. It may be of interest t
xty-first Pennsylvania, of the Sixth Corps, in which 19 officers were killed or mortally wounded during the war. Among the number were three colonels: Col. Rippey was killed at Fair Oaks; Col. Spear fell while leading a successful assault on Marye's Heights; and Col. Crosby, who had lost an arm at Fort Stevens, was killed in the final and victorious assault on Petersburg. The total loss of the Sixty-first in killed and died of wounds, was 19 officers and 218 enlisted men; total, 237. It was asylvania, Manassas. Colonel William B. Goodrich, 60th New York, Antietam. Colonel George W. Roberts, 42d Illinois, Stone's River. Colonel Frederick Schaefer, 2d Missouri, Stone's River. Colonel George C. Spear, 61st Pennsylvania, Marye's Heights. Colonel David S. Cowles, 128th New York, Port Hudson. Colonel George B. Boomer, 26th Missouri, Vicksburg. Colonel Edward E. Cross, 5th New Hampshire, Gettysburg. Colonel George L. Willard, 125th New York, Gettysburg. Colonel
better than any flight of rhetoric how often and how well they faced the enemy's fire. The story of the muster-out-roll is, at best, but a sad one. One is carried back to the war and surrounded by its sad pictures. In scanning the remarks attached to the names there are the ever recurring phrases which recall vividly its thrilling scenes. Killed, July 3, 1863, at Gettysburg; and one thinks of Pickett's charge, or other incidents of that historic field. Killed, May 3, 1863, at Marye's Heights; and the compiler lays down his pencil to dream again of that fierce charge which swept upward over the sloping fields of Fredericksburg. Wounded and missing, May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, suggests a nameless grave marked, if at all, by a Government headstone bearing the short, sad epitaph, Unknown. Killed at Malvern Hill, July 11 1862; and there rises a picture of an artilleryman lying dead at the wheels of his gun. Died of gunshot wound before Atlanta, August 20, 1864, tell
ne-half of which fell on Hancock's Division in the unsuccessful assault on Marye's Heights. The percentage of loss in Hancock's Division was large, Caldwells (1st) ruits, who made a dashing attempt, under his personal leadership, to carry Marye's Heights after all other efforts had failed. General Meade succeeded Butterfieldk Swamp Malvern Hill Manassas Crampton's Gap Antietam Fredericksburg Marye's Heights Salem Church Banks' Ford Gettysburg Funkstown Rappahannock Station Mal Sedgwick, who had succeeded to the corps command, ordered an assault on Marye's Heights, and that strong position which had defied the assaults of the previous baland necessitating a transfer of troops to confront him, and the heroes of Marye's Heights were selected for that duty. On July 6th, Ricketts' (3d) Division embarkee of the romance and brillancy of war. There was the successful assault of Marye's Heights; the brillant dash into the rifle pits at Rappahannock Station; the deadly
on was the one which Richardson — its first commander — led on the Peninsula, and at whose head he fell at Antietam; the one which, made the bloody assault on Marye's Heights; which, under Caldwell, fought so well in the Gettysburg wheat-field; which, under Barlow, surged over the enemy's works at Spotsylvania; and which, under Milen were killed or wounded in this division during the war; yet it never numbered 8,000 muskets, and often could muster only half of that. After the charge on Marye's Heights it numbered only 2,800. Close to it, however, in point of loss stands Gibbon's (2d) Division Formerly Sedgwick's. of the Second Corps, and Griffin's (1sanies to the front, and in this manner passed their respective lines. --[Hancock's Offical Report.--Antietam.] its desperate attack on the impregnable wall at Marye's Heights; its never failing promptness on every field; and its long continuous service, made for it a name inseparable from the history of the war. It belonged to the
n it was hotly engaged at the storming of Marye's Heights, and in the covering of the retreat on thStation; White Oak Swamp; Crampton's Gap; Marye's Heights; Salem Heights; Gettysburg; Rappahannock;ant Seaver, who commanded the regiment at Marye's Heights and in most all its battles, again led thsburg, Va. 1 Petersburg, Va., 1864 2 Marye's Heights, Va. 1 Charlestown, W. Va. 11 Banks's Forolonel Barney, who commanded the Sixth at Marye's Heights and in the subsequent campaigns, was killen Days; Antietam; Fredericksburg (1862); Marye's Heights; Rappahannock Station; Fort Stevens; Apporedericksburg in the desperate assault on Marye's Heights. Ninety-Third New York Infantry--Morurg, Va. (1862) 2 Cedar Creek, Va. 6 Marye's Heights, Va. 15 Petersburg, Va., March 25, 1865 4 commanded the brigade in the fighting at Marye's Heights and Salem Church, in which the regiment ln. It took part in the bloody assault on Marye's Heights, where each man in the brigade placed a s[16 more...]
elfth 21 110 7 138 123d New York Williams's Twelfth 16 114 18 148 25th Ohio Devens's Eleventh 14 107 31 152 8th New Jersey Berry's Third 18 101 6 125 82d Illinois Schurz's Eleventh 29 88 38 155 13th New Jersey Williams's Twelfth 17 100 24 141 5th New Jersey Berry's Third 13 102 6 121 37th New York Birney's Third 3 111 108 222 55th Ohio Devens's Eleventh 9 87 57 153 3d Wisconsin Williams's Twelfth 18 74 9 101 149th New York Geary's Twelfth 15 68 103 186 Marye's Heights, Va. Including losses at other parts of the field, Salem Heights, etc.             May 3, 1863.             5th Wisconsin Burnham's Sixth 35 122 36 193 33d New York Howe's Sixth 17 130 74 221 7th Massachusetts Newton's Sixth 22 125 3 150 6th Maine Burnham's Sixth 23 111 35 169 2d Vermont Including loss at Banks' Ford. Howe's Sixth 17 115 -- 132 Salem Church, Va.             May 3, 1863.             121st New York Brooks's Sixth 48 173 55 27
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
ilor's Creek, Va. Nashville, Tenn. Tupelo, Miss.   The Union armies were successful, also, in the following assaults. They were the attacking party, and carried the forts, or intrenched positions, by storm. Fort Harrison, Va. Marye's Heights, Va. (1863) Rappahannock Station, Va. Fort McAllister, Ga. Lookout Mountain, Tenn. Jonesboro, Ga. Fort Fisher, N. C. Cloyd's Mountain, W. Va. Fall of Petersburg, Va. Fort Blakely, Ala.     In the following battles the Confederate 50 22 78 April 13 Fort Bisland, La 40 184 -- 224 April 14 Irish Bend, La 49 274 30 353 April 11-30 Siege of Suffolk, Va 41 223 2 266 May 1 Port Gibson, Miss.Magnolia Hills, Miss 131 719 25 875 May 1-4 Includes loss at Marye's Heights and Salem Church, viz.; 493 killed, 2,710 wounded, 1,497 missing. Also, loss at Fitzhugh's Crossing.Chancellorsville, Va 1,606 9,762 5,919 17,287 May 12 Raymond, Miss 66 339 37 442 May 14 Jackson, Miss 42 251 7 300 May 16 Champion's