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December 25. Two spans of a bridge across the Charleston River, Mo., on the Hannibal and St. Joseph's Railroad, were burned by the rebels this night.--Cincinnati Enquirer, December 27. This day about noon, the stout gunboat Florida, C. S. N., concluded to celebrate Christmas eve by a small set — to with the insolent Lincoln cruiser New London, which was lying off the mouth of the harbor of Mobile, Ala, The Florida ran down to the westward of Sand Island, and challenged the New London to come on, which she did, and for an hour or two a lively cannonade at long two furnished an excitingly interesting exhibition for the entertainment of the great audience which viewed it — the four thousand men who garrison Forts Morgan and Gaines, as well as the crews of the blockading vessels, being the spectators. The Florida could not come to close quarters with the enemy by reason of the shoal water of a bar intervening, and could she have got out it is likely she would have had more th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
the commanding officers of the different vessels, made a reconnoissance on the steam-tender Cowslip, running inside of Sand Island, where the three monitors were anchored, and within easy range of both the forts. On the left, some three miles distantry had learned to look beyond State lines and to disregard the ties of kinship. As we steamed slowly along inside Sand Island, inspecting every hostile point, a Confederate transport landed at Fort Gaines, and began discharging cargo. At a sigvessels could enter the bay. Between Dauphine Island and Fort Morgan, and in front of the main entrance to the bay, is Sand Island, a barren spot, under the lee of which three of our monitors were lying. The army signal officers were sent on board noticed, and that they would evade the command if possible. In this they were successful until shortly before passing Sand Island and coming within range of Fort Morgan. Then the executive officer, Lieutenant-Commander Lewis A. Kimberly, who never
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The ram Tennessee at Mobile Bay. (search)
During the night a blockade-runner entered the bay and was boarded by the executive officer of the Tennessee. At about 6 o'clock on the morning of the 5th, the fleet was discovered to be under way toward the bay, the monitors on the right and the wooden vessels lashed together two and two, each of the heavier ships having a gun-boat lashed alongside. All the light spars had been sent down, leaving only the lower and top masts standing, while the boats had been hauled upon the beach at Sand Island just within the bar, on the morning previous. All hands were immediately called on board the Confederate vessels, and after hurriedly taking coffee, the crew were set to work to slip the cable and buoy the anchor. This being done, they were assembled at their quarters for action, as the distance from the bar to the entrance of the bay is only about three miles, and the Federal vessels were already within range of the guns of Fort Morgan and were receiving its fire without damage. A
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
oncerning Buchanan's force, and they were far from reassuring to the Union commander, who up to this time had not received a single iron-clad. It was not until July 26th that the arrival of the Monitor Manhattan was reported. She was under Sand Island, in charge of gun-boats. The two double-turreted Monitors, Winnebago and Chickasaw, sent from Admiral Porter's fleet on the Mississippi, were in New Orleans, and would be off Mobile about the 30th of July. The Tecumseh was not yet heard frdge. Place a leadsman and the pilot in the port-quarter boat or the one most convenient to the commander. The vessels will run past the forts in couples, lashed side by side, as hereafter designated. The flag-ship will lead and steer from Sand Island N. by E. by compass until abreast of Fort Morgan, then N. W. half N., until past the Middle Ground; then N. by W; and the others, as designated in the drawing, will follow in due order, until directed to anchor; but the bow and quarter line mu
bago, Mobile Bay, Aug. 6, 1864. To Rear-Admiral D. G. Farragut, Commanding W. G. B. Squadron: sir: I have the honor to report that, according to instructions, this vessel yesterday, at half-past 5 A. M. got under way from her anchorage near Sand Island, and proceeded up the bay for the purpose of attacking the enemy. At seven took station between Fort Morgan and the wooden vessels of the fleet in line of battle. At fifteen minutes past seven opened fire on the fort, the enemy firing ra Place a leadsman and the pilot in the port-quarter boat, or the one most convenient to the Commander. The vessels will run past the forts in couples, lashed side by side, as hereinafter designated. The flag-ship will lead, and steer from Sand Island N. by E. by compass, until abreast of Fort Morgan; then N. W. half N. until past the Middle Ground; then N. by W.; and the others, as designated in the drawing, will follow in due order, until ordered to anchor; but the bow and quarter-line mu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.49 (search)
r. Admiral Roberts recently visited the old forts near Mobile, Ala. I have learned, said Admiral Roberts, that in the summer of 1863, before the attempt was made to run by Forts Morgan and Gaines, mosquitoes prevented the death or capture of Admiral Farragut. The mortar fleet of Admiral Farragut, while anchored in Mississippi Sound, within shelling distance of Fort Powell, at Grant's Pass, was bombarding that stronghold. Admiral Farragut was on one of the blockading vessels at Sand Island, in the gulf off Mobile Bay. In order to personally look after the shelling operations the admiral would run down the island on the gulf side, land in a small boat opposite the mortar fleet, and cross Dauphin Island, which was very narrow at that point. He would meet a small boat on the sound side, which conveyed him to the mortar fleet. On these trips he was usually accompanied by one man, his secretary or aid, and as the crossing was made within a mile of the woods, which extended
ed honors ever conferred upon him. Governor Magoffin, of Kentucky, had his left arm broken at its socket on Sunday last, by the upsetting of a stage coach at Harrodsburg. Seventeen men are stated to have been seriously poisoned, recently, by drinking tea, in Wisconsin. A lizard's body was found in the tea-kettle. A woman of forty-two, Anna Marston, attended the funeral of her eighth husband in Portsmouth, England, on the 13th ult. Archibald Campbell, editor of the Wheeling Intelligencer, has been nominated for postmaster at that place. The lights at Mobile Point and Sand Island have been extinguished by order of the commander of Fort Morgan. Joshua Lee was killed in Wirt county, Va., last week, by a blow alleged to have been given by his son-in-law, named Dolan. The journals of Turin announce the death of Colatta Marchioani, one of the most celebrated dramatic artists of the age. Eugene Sinbe, the dramatist, died in his carriage, of apoplexy.
us with the following items of interest: Naval engagement near Mobile, Ala. From the Mobile Evening News, of the 28th ult., we take the following account of a nice little affair which recently took place in the bay near that place: About mid-day yesterday the stout gunboat Florida, C. S. N., concluded to celebrate Christmas eve by a small set to with the insolent Lincoln cruiser New London, which was lying off the mouth of the harbor. The Florida ran down to the westward of Sand Island, and challenged the New London to come on, which she did, and for an hour or two a lively cannonade at long taw furnished an excitingly interesting exhibition for the entertainment of the great audience which viewed it, the four thousand men who garrison Forts Morgan and Gaines, as well as The crews of the blockading vessels, being the spectators. The Florida could not come to close quarters with the enemy by reason of the shoal water of a bar intervening, and could she have got out it i
Wreck of the Roger Ahern. Mobile, December 19. --The ship Roger Ahern, Summerville, with two thousand seven hundred bales of cotton, from Mobile for Liverpool, was wrecked on Sand Island.--She is supposed to be a total loss.