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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 18, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), New Mexico, (search)
Socorro......1889 Insane asylum at Las Vegas created by act of legislature......1889 Territorial board of health provided for by act of legislature......1889 Constitutional convention meets at Santa Fe Sept. 3, adopts a constitution for the proposed State of New Mexico, and appoints a committee to present it to Congress......Sept. 21, 1889 A. M. Howland, a wealthy retired wool merchant from Boston, in connection with Dr. Tanner, the faster, locates a colony of vegetarians in Mesilla Valley, and produces a voluminous volume which is called Oahspe, a new bible, a curious compilation of all the religious beliefs of the earth, alleging that the manuscript was written out on a typewriter through spiritual inspiration. The word Oahspe is said to be from the language of the continent of Pan, buried under the Pacific ages ago, and is compounded of O, the sky, ah, the earth, and spe, the spirit......1889 Agricultural college at Las Cruces opened......Jan. 21, 1890 Constituti
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
Mexico, and to assume debts of Mexico to citizens of the United States, not to exceed $3,250,000. The treaty contained twenty-three articles, all of which were liberal. The area of the ceded territory was 522,568 square miles. (Donaldson's Public Domain, p. 136.) A little later the Gadsden Purchase was added to the previously acquired territory. The cession of this territory was a corollary to the cessions of Mexico, and was made for the benefit of American settlers along the rich Mesilla valley and the Gila river, and to afford a better line for the southern boundary. It was signed by James Gadsden, on the part of the United States, and Manuel Diaz de Bonilla, Jose Salazar Ylarregui, and J. Mariana Monterde, on the part of Mexico. It was concluded December 30, 1853, and was ratified and promulgated June 30, 1854. The ceded territory cost $10,000,000, and contains about 45,535 square miles. It is the smallest of the acquisitions. The treaty by which it was acquired was sign
t is unimportant. There is a bill before the Legislature which provides that no officer be appointed to the Government who cannot read, write, and converse intelligently in Hawaiian. The news from Arizona, without date, states that Gen. Carleton, with the California volunteers, had reached the Rio Grande without opposition. The rebel General Sibley had withdrawn his forces from New Mexico into Texas. The Apache Indians attacked two companies of Federal cavalry passing through Mesilla Valley, killing seven and wounding several. The Indians were repulsed with great loss. Butter 23 cents per pound. No other change. The loss of the Golden Gate — no probability of saving the treasure. San Francisco, Aug. 7. --Capt. Budson, at Manzanilla on the 30th of July, reports to the agents of the Golden Gate here that, owing to the shelving beach and heavy surf where the wreck is lying, there is little probability of saving the treasure.--He, with a part of the crew and