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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 4 2 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
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April 26-29, 1862.-scout on Forked Deer River, Tenn. Report of Capt. J. G. Ballentine, C. S. Army. Cavalry camp, near Ripley, Tenn., April 29, 1862. Sir: After returning to camp from a four days scout on the Forked Deer River I have the honor to submit the following report: According to orders received I proceededForked Deer River I have the honor to submit the following report: According to orders received I proceeded by the most direct route to Key Corner, a small village situated on the banks of Forked Deer River, in Lauderdale County, State of Tennessee, distant from the Mississippi River about 15 miles, the road from this place (Ripley) being one of the finest natural roads I know of in this portion of the State, and at the present time in Forked Deer River, in Lauderdale County, State of Tennessee, distant from the Mississippi River about 15 miles, the road from this place (Ripley) being one of the finest natural roads I know of in this portion of the State, and at the present time in fine condition for the passing of any and all kinds of vehicles; the country slightly broken, plenty of water, and settled by small planters-forage and provisions of all kinds being scarce and difficult to obtain. After passing the junction of the Ashport and Key Corner roads, I found small quantities of cotton, from 10 to 30 bag
: Your regiment will hold and guard the line from Bolivar to Pocahontas, scouting occasionally toward Bethel, and you will keep your command in readiness to move at a moment's notice to the assistance of Colonels Lindsay and Brewer. These officers, with their regiments, have been ordered to guard the railroad and bridges from Pocahontas to this place; also occasionally scouting toward Bethel. Colonel Jackson, with his command, has been ordered to guard the line from Brownsville to Forked Deer River via Ripley, reporting fully to General Villepigue. Respectfully, your obedient servant, Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters Western Department, Corinth, Miss., May 12, 1862. Maj. Eugene E. Mclean: Major: The commanding general desires that you should take immediate measures for the boring of artesian wells within the lines occupied by this army. He wishes the utmost energy infused into the work. It is said that the implements in working order can be had a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Meeting at the White Sulphur Springs. (search)
was the signal for all these men to rally around him, and by the 23d of December he had collected a force of about three thousand men, all unarmed except about two hundred. In the meantime, General Hurlbut was not idle, and General Sherman, who was determined to capture Forrest if possible, was directing the movements against him. The rains had been heavy and the streams were all full. The Tennessee was behind him and on his left, the Mississippi on his right, and before him were the Forked Deer, Hatchie and Wolf rivers, and General Hurlbut at Memphis, with twenty thousand troops, watching every probable crossing place of these rivers, while troops were moving from Union City, Fort Pillow and Paducah, on his flank and rear. Loaded down as he was with three thousand unarmed men and a heavy train of supplies, escape would have seemed impossible to a less daring and less wary man. But one of the greatest secrets of Forrest's success was his perfect system of scouts. He kept able a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Forrest's report of operations in December, 1863. (search)
osed the fight at Collierville about eight o'clock at night, driving the enemy into their fortifications. Not being able to hear anything of General Chalmers, and my men being worn out, I felt it to be prudent to retire, which I did, and my command is camped about seven miles west of this place. Another difficulty in the matter was that all my men armed with Austrian rifles were out of ammunition, having had the misfortune to lose my Austrian ammunition by the upsetting of a wagon at Forked Deer river. I have brought out about 2,500 men. Colonel Faulkner, who is to cross at Raleigh, has with him about 800 men. I hope to hear that they have gotten out safely by to-morrow. If I could have stayed there ten days longer, I could have almost doubled that number. I brought out my wagon train and artillery safely,. although I have never experienced such weather and roads. My stock, however, is much jaded, and requires rest. I have a lot of prisoners, and General Tuttle has signifie
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Tennessee, 1863 (search)
tas to Pontotoc, Miss.(No Reports.) July 8: Scout to GermantownILLINOIS--3d Cavalry. July 10: Skirmish, BolivarILLINOIS--11th Cavalry. July 10: Skirmish, Union CityMISSOURI--4th Cavalry (Cos. "C," "E"). Union loss, 2 killed, 8 wounded, 90 missing. Total, 100. July 10: Skirmish, Cocke CountyTENNESSEE--2d Cavalry. July 11-14: Reconnoissance from Cowan to AndersonMISSOURI--2d and 15th Infantry. July 12: Action, JonesboroughPENNSYLVANIA--9th Cavalry. July 13: Skirmishes, Jackson and Forked Deer RiverILLINOIS--9th Mounted Infantry. IOWA--2d Cavalry. MICHIGAN--3d Cavalry. TENNESSEE--1st West Cavalry. Union loss, 1 killed, 10 wounded, 3 missing. Total, 14. July 15: Skirmish, Forked Deer CreekILLINOIS--9th Mounted Infantry. MICHIGAN--3d Cavalry. July 15: Skirmish, PulaskiOHIO--3d Cavalry. TENNESSEE--5th Cavalry. July 15: Skirmish near Jackson(No Reports.) July 16: Action, MemphisOHIO--5th Cavalry. July 16: Skirmish, La GrangeIOWA--2d Cavalry. July 16-20: Scout from GermantownILLI
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
, 1863. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, Arkansas Expedition, to November, 1863. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, Army of Arkansas, to January, 1864. 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, Dept. of Arkansas, to May, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, 7th Army Corps, to July, 1865. Service. Assigned to Provost duty at Jackson, Tenn., and as railroad guard along Mobile & Ohio R. R. till March, 1863. Repulse of Forest's attack on Jackson December 20, 1862. Railroad crossing Forked Deer River December 20 (Cos. H, I and K ). Moved to Bolivar, Tenn., March, 1863; thence to Vicksburg, Miss., May 31. Siege of Vicksburg, Miss., June 9-July 4. Surrender of Vicksburg July 4. Ordered to Helena, Ark., July 29; thence moved to Clarendon, Ark., August 13, and to Duvall's Bluff August 22. Steele's Expedition against Little Rock, Ark., September 1-10. Bayou Fourche and capture of Little Rock September 10. Duty there till October 26. Pursuit of Marmaduke's Forces
camp was most praiseworthy. The arms were in good condition, and the clothing of the men neat and uniform. The general commanding tenders his thanks to Colonels Roddey and Patterson and the gallant officers and men of their commands for the interest manifested by them in perfecting their discipline and increasing their efficiency. (944) Col. W. A. Johnson, Roddey's brigade, Wheeler's corps, Bragg's army, July 31st. No. 37—(674) Mentioned by Colonel Hatch (Union) in skirmishes on Forked Deer river, Tenn., July 13, 1863. No. 38—(192) Roddey's regiment, 800 strong, with General Roddey at Tuscumbia, Ala., April, 1863. (614) In Roddey's brigade, Martin's division, Major-General Van Dorn's corps, February 2d. No. 53—(501) In Roddey's brigade, Morgan's division, Wheeler's corps, army of Tennessee, August 15, 1863. No. 54—(593, 594, 604) Mentioned in Federal reports. No. 55—(664) In Roddey's brigade, detached, Wheeler's corps, Bragg's army, November 20, 18
nd agnostic, of the Eleventh Illinois cavalry. Col. G. G. Dibrell, Eighth Tennessee cavalry, being pushed forward in the direction of Jackson, at Webb's or Carroll Station captured 101 prisoners, destroyed the railroad for miles, exchanged 100 of his flint-lock muskets for improved arms, burned the stockade, and rejoined Forrest at Spring creek. On the 20th, Dibrell, with his regiment and one field gun under Capt. John W. Morton, attempted to destroy the stockade and bridge across the Forked Deer river, but was repulsed by a large infantry force, losing several men killed and wounded. On the 19th, Forrest, with two companies commanded by Col. T. G. Woodward, Kentucky cavalry, and Col. J. B. Biffle's Nineteenth Tennessee cavalry, with a section of Freeman's battery, drove the Federals, reported at 9,000, inside of their fortifications at Jackson, and then moved rapidly on Humboldt and Trenton. The gallant Col. J. W. Starnes, Fourth Tennessee, was sent against Humboldt, where he c
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.28 (search)
and went down the line giving orders to the other gangs to burn instead of cut the the trestles. We made such good speed that by dark we had destroyed at least a mile of trestle, some of it fully fifteen feet high. The weather had turned bitter cold and the trestle was covered with sleet and ice. In West Tennessee. Leaving a strong rear guard, the command started north along the railroad, burning every bridge and capturing every blockhouse as far as Union City, save the one at Forked Deer River. There I saw a force of Confederates trying to capture the blockhouse, and, thinking it my regiment, I stopped after passing the blockhouse, hitched my horse and went to join them, when I found it was Dibrell's regiment, and also learned that Starnes's regiment had pushed on to capture Humboldt. Mounting, I made the best speed my horse was capable of, but I heard cannonading when about four miles distant. From the increasing fire of artillery, I judged my regiment had cut off more th
Jackson, Madison County, Tennessee a town of 6,000 pop., on Forked Deer River, 150 miles W. S. W. of Nashville. The Mobile & Ohio Railroad passes through the town, and it is a place of active trade.
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