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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The principal voyages of the English Nation to the Isles of Trinidad, Margarita, Dominica , Deseada, Monserrate, Guadalupe , Martinino, and all the rest of the Antilles ; As likewise to S. Juan de Puerto Rico, to Hispaniola, Jamaica and Cuba : and also to Tierra Firma, and all along the coast and Islands therof, even from Cumana and the Caracos to the neckland of Dariene, and over it to the Gulfe of S. Michael and the Isle of Perles in the South sea: and further to Cabeca Cativa, Nombre de dios, and Venta de cruzes, to Puerto Belo, Rio de Chagre, and the Isle of Escudo, along the maine of Beragua, to the Cape and Gulfe of the Honduras, to Truxillo, Puerto de Cavallos, and all other the principall Townes, Islands and harbours of accompt within the said Gulfe, and up Rio dolce falling into this Gulfe, above 30. leagues : As also to the Isle of Cocumel, and to Cape Cotoche, the towne of Campeche , and other places upon the land of lucatan; and lower downe to S. Juan de Ullua, Vera Cruz, Rio de Panuco, Rio de Palmas, &c. within the Bay of Mexico: and from thence to the Isles of the Tortugas, the port of Havana , the Cape of Florida, and the Gulfe of Bahama homewards. With the taking, sacking, ransoming, or burning of most of the principall Cities and townes upon the coasts of Tierra firma, Nueva Espanna, and all the foresaid Islands; since the most traiterous burning of her Majesties ship the Jesus of Lubec and murthering of her Subjects in the port of S. Juan de Ullua, and the last generall arrest of her Highnesse people, with their ships and goods throughout all the dominions of the King of Spaine in the moneth of June 1585. Besides the manifold and tyrannicall oppressions of the Inquisition inflicted on our nation upon most light and frivolous occasions. (search)
o have gotten in that night to have landed: but the current striketh so strong out of the bay that we could not recover the towne till day light. In the morning we espied 2 sailes before the towne but could not fetch them. Here we plied too and againe in the sound all the forenoone, but could not get up so farre as the towne. These 2 sailes came roome to us, after they saw that we were at an anker, & came somewhat neere us, and sent their skyphs abord our admiral. They were 2 flieboats of Middleburgh which traded there, & had secretly advertised the country of our comming, to our great hinderance: but we knew it not at our first arrivall. Here they of Cumana perceiving that we would land, came to parle with us, and tolde us, if we would land, we might easily take the towne, for they ment not to withstand us, but that they had caried all their goods into the mountaines, but, if we would not land to burne and spoile the towne, they would give us some reasonable ransome, and any victu
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The victorious voyage of Captaine Amias Preston now knight, and Captaine George Sommers to the West India, begun in March 1595. Wherein the yle of Puerto Santo, the yle of Coche neere Margarita, the fort and towne of Coro , the stately city of S. Iago de Leon were taken sacked and burned, and the towne of Cumana ransomed, & Jamaica entred. Written by Robert Davie one of the company. (search)
o have gotten in that night to have landed: but the current striketh so strong out of the bay that we could not recover the towne till day light. In the morning we espied 2 sailes before the towne but could not fetch them. Here we plied too and againe in the sound all the forenoone, but could not get up so farre as the towne. These 2 sailes came roome to us, after they saw that we were at an anker, & came somewhat neere us, and sent their skyphs abord our admiral. They were 2 flieboats of Middleburgh which traded there, & had secretly advertised the country of our comming, to our great hinderance: but we knew it not at our first arrivall. Here they of Cumana perceiving that we would land, came to parle with us, and tolde us, if we would land, we might easily take the towne, for they ment not to withstand us, but that they had caried all their goods into the mountaines, but, if we would not land to burne and spoile the towne, they would give us some reasonable ransome, and any victu
October 8. The battle of Chaplin Hills, or Perryville, Ky., was this day fought between the Union army under General Buell, and the rebel forces under General Bragg, resulting, after an engagement of several hours' duration, in the retreat of the rebels across Chaplin River. The loss on both sides was very severe. The Union Generals Jackson and Terrell were killed in this battle.--(Doc. 128.) Seventeen National Government wagons, a number of sutlers' wagons, and about five hundred and fifty men of Gen. Sill's column, under the command of Major Bradford, were this day captured in the vicinity of Frankfort, Ky., by the rebel forces under Gen. E. Kirby Smith.--A force of seventeen Union cavalrymen to-day dashed into Middleburgh, Loudon County, Va., and captured several wagons loaded with bacon belonging to the rebels.
g to their camp.--(Doc. 18.) Early this morning a force of Union troops under the command of Major Keenan, Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, left Purcellsville, Va., on a reconnoitring expedition. They passed through Berrysville, Snickersville, and Philomont. On arriving at Union they found that town occupied by a battalion of Georgia cavalry, whom they drove out. Here it was ascertained that General Walker, in command of a force of South-Carolina troops, was in position five miles from Middleburgh. Major Keenan also found about a hundred wounded rebel soldiers, all of whom he paroled, and learned that General Longstreet was in command of the rebel forces near Upperville. He next proceeded to Aldie, in the vicinity of which place he unexpectedly came upon a detachment of the First Michigan cavalry, sent out by General Sigel from his command near Centreville. Major Keenan then returned to Purcellsville, having marched thirty-five miles, and obtained some valuable information.
June 18. Middleburgh and Philomont, Va., were occupied by the National cavalry. It having been ascertained that a heavy force of the rebels was about to advance through Northern Mississippi upon the railroad, for the purpose of destroying the bridges near Pocahontas, Lieutenant-Colonel Phillips, of the Ninth Illinois, was despatched to meet, and, if possible, check their movement. He had with him his own regiment, the third battalion of the Fifth Ohio cavalry, Major Smith, and a part of the Eighteenth Missouri, all mounted. When near Ripley he found the rebels in force, and began to fall back, drawing them north toward Pocahontas. After a little feint of this kind, Colonel Phillips turned and went toward the enemy. At Rocky Crossing, of the Tallahatchie, he came up with General Ruggles, with a force of two thousand infantry, one battery, and a large force of cavalry. Although Colonel Phillips had but six hundred men all told, and no artillery, yet he offered battle,
rs of Louisiana, made a formal application to the President of the United States, for readmission into the Union.--(Doc. 75.) General Gregg, with his cavalry, met the rebel line of skirmishers in a piece of wood a short distance west of Middleburgh, Va., and forced them back about five miles on the road leading to Ashby's Gap, where the enemy had two brigades of infantry. Artillery was used occasionally on both sides, but most of the time the fight was more of an Indian warfare than any thd and wounded at the hospital, a majority of the wounds being of a serious character. Some forty prisoners were captured, including six officers, a lieutenant-colonel, a major, a captain and three lieutenants. When the Tenth New York entered Middleburgh yesterday, they found five of the missing First Rhode Island troopers locked up in a store, their captors not having an opportunity even to parole or carry them off, so sudden was the charge into the town made. The rebels at Williamsport
he Aeronautic corps of the army of the Potomac was dispensed with, and the balloons and inflating apparatus were sent to Washington. The fight at Lafourche Crossing, La., was renewed this day, and ended in the defeat of the rebels with a loss of sixty killed, two hundred and forty wounded, and seventy prisoners. The Union loss was eight killed and sixteen wounded.--New Orleans Era, June 23. Major-General Pleasanton, with his cavalry, attacked the rebels, under General Stuart, at Middleburgh, Va., and after driving them over eight miles, succeeded in capturing two pieces of artillery, and sixty prisoners, besides killing and wounding over one hundred men.--(Doc. 77.) The ship Byzantium and bark Goodspeed were captured and burned by the rebel privateer Tacony off the coast of Massachusetts.--on the approach of the rebels toward Shippensburgh, Pa., the proprietor of the Union Hotel in that town blurred his sign over with brown paint.--the steamer Victory was captured off C
February 18. An expedition, consisting of four hundred men belonging to the National cavalry, under General Gregg, left Warrenton, Va., last night, to examine the country in the direction of Middleburgh and Aldie. This evening the party returned, bringing in twenty-eight of Mosby's rebel guerrillas and fifty-one horses. On their return they were charged on by the rest of the guerrilla band, for the purpose of retaking their fellows, but the charge was repulsed, and one more prisoner added to those already in the hands of the Union cavalry.
ia, and they, as also those captured at York and Wrightsville, were immediately paroled and discharged. On the morning of June twenty-fourth, A. P. Hill's corps (the Third) crossed the Potomac at Boteler's Mill, one mile below Shepherdstown, Anderson's division being in the advance. That night the head of Hill's corps reached Boonsboro, which latter place was occupied by Wright's brigade of Anderson's division. From this place we moved on Chambersburgh, via Funkstown, Hagerstown, and Middleburgh, reaching the former on the twenty-seventh. Passing through Chambersburgh on the twenty-seventh, we pushed on to Fayetteville, five miles from Chambersburgh, on the Baltimore and Philadelphia turnpike. Here we halted until Tuesday, the thirtieth, waiting for the rear of the corps and our supply trains to come up. In the mean time Longstreet's corps had turned up the river from Millwood, and, passing through Martinsburgh, crossed the river at Williamsport, and, falling into our line of a
Doc. 32.-the Union cavalry service. Details of the operations during the campaign against Lee, June and July, 1863. Falling Waters, Maryland, Wednesday, July 15, 1863. in addition to the battles of Beverly Ford, Aldie, Middleburgh and Upperville, now matters of history, I have to record fifteen more engagements of our cavalry with the enemy, in thirteen of which cavalry was exclusively used, with flying artillery--all within sixteen days. I have already furnished you with brief accounts of these battles as they have transpired — such as could be hastily prepared when prostrated by fatigue produced by physical exertion and the loss of sleep, and laboring under the depressing effect of a relapse from the wildest excitement and while seated on the wet grass or under a dripping tree — valuable time, in which companions sought repose. But how describe fifteen battles in sixteen days? To do the subject justice would require the pen of a Victor Hugo and as much time as was con
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