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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 70 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 47 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 8 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Recollections of Grant. (search)
for many months, preparing for the great battles of Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. I was under Sherman now, and joining in the charge made by a part of Smith's Division, on the right wing of Bragg's army, was surrounded and captured. It was the last battle of my life. I saw my sword, and pistols, and purse divided among a corporal and two privates, who came near shooting each other on account of the trophies captured from the young Yankee. I also saw, however, from the top of Mission Ridge, the flying enemy, and the grand advance of Thomas' and Sherman's armies. I was a prisoner! What I experienced during more than fifteen months in the prisons of Libby, Columbia, Charleston, and elsewhere, will not be related here. In September, 1864, the Libby prisoners, seven hundred in number, and all officers, were transferred from Charleston to a camp in the woods, on the Congaree river, near Columbia, South Carolina. There seemed but one outlook ahead for us, and that was a l
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
of the brigade, the arduous and important duties necessarily imposed upon them. Having now submitted the customary details, based upon the best data at my command, I should regard the report of operations in so great a campaign as the one just closed as incomplete did I omit to bear tribute to the excellent esprit de corps and veteran steadiness and bravery of the officers and men in the gallant old First Brigade. Tried on the fields of Shiloh, Stone's River, bloody Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge, they could not fail, even when put to the severer test of 123 days of active field duty, unrelieved by a consecutive night of secure rest; no maneuvers, however self-evidently dangerous, have called forth dissatisfaction or a spoken doubt; no murmurs have come from them of necessarily imposed, but heavy, duty in storm or sunshine; no officer or enlisted man mars the records of our courts-martial with a cowardly charge against his name; no flag has received a stain or been lost because i
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 151 (search)
n. J. B. Turchin, one of the most thoroughly educated and scientific soldiers in the country, and a more devoted patriot than most of those born upon our soil, commanded the First Brigade with distinguished ability during the first half of the campaign. He was then, by a failure of health, compelled to resign, thus inflicting a great loss upon the service. Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, the brave and accomplished commander of the Second Brigade at Chickamauga and at Mission Ridge, remained with the command until the end of June. He also has, by expiration of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services througho
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Battle of Jonesborough. (search)
n. J. B. Turchin, one of the most thoroughly educated and scientific soldiers in the country, and a more devoted patriot than most of those born upon our soil, commanded the First Brigade with distinguished ability during the first half of the campaign. He was then, by a failure of health, compelled to resign, thus inflicting a great loss upon the service. Col. F. Van Derveer, Thirty-fifth Ohio Volunteers, the brave and accomplished commander of the Second Brigade at Chickamauga and at Mission Ridge, remained with the command until the end of June. He also has, by expiration of service, been returned to civil life. Col. George P. Este, who has commanded the Third Brigade during the campaign; Col. N. Gleason, who has succeeded Colonel Van Derveer in command of the Second Brigade, and Col. M. B. Walker, who has succeeded Brigadier-General Turchin, have all exhibited a high degree of capacity. Their devotion to duty, their bravery in action, and their distinguished services througho
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 155 (search)
brigade at a double-quick. The assault having commenced, I received an order from General Baird, through Major Connolly, to move farther to the right and support Este if necessary; moved rapidly up within about 150 yards of Este's line and ordered my men to cheer the gallant fellows who were then driving the enemy from his works. This they did with a will, knowing that their old comrades, with whom they had stood side by side at Perryville, Stone's River, Hoover's Gap, Chickamauga, and Mission Ridge, and all through the great campaign, were in the deadly breach. But it was soon over. The work was done and the Third Brigade immortalized, and but 12 of my brave men had won the renown of being struck in this most brilliant affair. The enemy's works being carried, I relieved Colonel Este's brigade with my front line, and assisted in carrying off his killed and wounded-alas! too many of whom we found upon that bloody field. Groping my way in the darkness to those bloody trenches, st
the battle-field to Rossville. During the night they withdrew to Rossville with the remainder of the army. The Second division of the Twentieth corps, under General Johnson, fell back to Rossville with the. Fourteenth corps, Willich's brigade forming the rear-guard. On the night of the twentieth, the Twentieth corps was in good order united at Rossville. On the morning of the twenty-first, a short time after daylight, the corps was again put in line of battle, the left resting on Mission Ridge, covering the Crawfish Spring road, the right extending toward Chattanooga Creek and Lookout Mountain. The corps remained in this position until two A. M. of the twenty-second of September, when it was withdrawn to Chattanooga with the rest of the army. Since arriving at Chattanooga, the corps has been engaged in heavy guard-duty, and erecting strong lines of intrenchments, which, in my opinion, can only be taken by regular approaches. My thanks are due to Colonel Joseph E. McKibb
ing the course of the Chattanooga Creek, and formed by Lookout Mountain and Mission Ridge. East of Mission Ridge, and running parallel with it, is another valley — Mission Ridge, and running parallel with it, is another valley — Chickamauga Valley-following the course of Chickamauga Creek, which, with the Chattanooga Creek, discharges its waters into the Tennessee River — the first above, ane wagon-road from Chattanooga to Rome, known as the Lafayette Road, crosses Mission Ridge into Chickamauga Valley at Rossville, and, proceeding in a south-westerly de residue crossing the Chattanooga road, and retreating in the direction of Mission Ridge. Night interposed, and though it brought with it a magnificent moon, no or encumbered with heavy trains, and no mode of exit save through two gaps of Mission Ridge, a mountain? No. Night had set in, and he deemed it prudent to halt, notwiorning, Wednesday, twenty-third September. The army moved up to and over Mission Ridge, where it was halted, and where it remains halted to this day, the twenty-e<
auga; while McCook, zigzagging down and up Mission ridge, had likewise made his way into the cove, ville, a small hamlet situated in a gap of Mission ridge, four miles south of Chattanooga and six who had already taken post on the slope of Mission ridge, behind Thomas's line of battle, and just held the Rossville and Dry valley gaps of Mission ridge — Crittenden's corps holding the left of tssion of Lookout mountain and the whole of Mission ridge, whence he looked down into the coveted sticult steeps known as Lookout mountain and Mission ridge, and across the valley at tile mouth of Chy sharp fighting, carried the north end of Mission ridge nearly to the railroad tunnel; and here hend of Lookout mountain to the north end of Mission ridge, with the enemy compressed between them. ville; driving the enemy out of the gap in Mission ridge by flanking them, and capturing guns, muni Lookout mountain, Chattanooga valley, and Mission ridge, was in our possession, together with a la[4 more...]
ent, to doubt the ability of the Government to put down the Rebellion. Those of 1863, on the other hand, had strongly favored the Administration ; because the National successes at Gettysburg, Vicksburg, Port Hudson, Helena, &c., the reopening of the Mississippi, and the recovery of East Tennessee, with a good part of Arkansas, had induced a very general belief, which our reverse at the Chickamauga did not shake, that the Union would surely triumph, and at no distant day. The victory of Mission ridge, followed by the appointment of (Gen. Grant to the chief command of all the National forces, strengthened this belief into conviction ; so that, though there were still those who did not desire the overthrow of the Rebellion, as there had been, even in the darkest hours, many whose faith in the National cause never faltered nor was shaded by a doubt — the strongly prevalent opinion of the loyal States, throughout the Spring of 1864, imported that Gen. Grant would make short work of what
tes at Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Valley, and Mission Ridge, 438 to 442. Baltimore, National platform of s Bend, Ark., 319. Mill Spring, Ky.. 42. Mission Ridge, Tenn., 441. Mobile Bay, Ala., 651. Murfreesboroaives him from Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga, and Mission Ridge. 438 to 445; his official report, 443; losses ong from Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Valley, and Mission Ridge, 438 to 445; his official report, 442; losses onagg at Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Valley, and Mission Ridge, 438 to 442. Johnson, Zachartah, on the Slaverest and Van Dorn, 284; at Chickamauga. 421; at Mission Ridge, 438-442; at the Wilderness and Spottsylvania, 5g from Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Valley, and Mission Ridge, 413; assigned to the command of the Mississippi34; at Lookout Mountain, Chattanooga Valley, and Mission Ridge, 434-446; his official report, 442; in the Atlanded at Stone River, 276; at Chickamauga, 415; at Mission Ridge, 442; at Nashville, 654-6. Wood, Maj., brings
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