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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 8 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Monocacy River (United States) or search for Monocacy River (United States) in all documents.

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and feathers; and when he ordered his guards to clear his quarters of idle crowds, many went away muttering: Oh! He's no great shakes after all! On the tenth, reports came in that the Federal cavalry advance-guard had already reached the Monocacy river, a few miles fronting our line above and below Fredericksburgh, and that heavy skirmishing had occurred there. This was positive proof that McClellan was advancing, and far more rapidly than we had expected. On the eleventh, our line frong them, and must lose much time in doing so.. This, in fact, was all that Lee originally intended, as the events that now rapidly succeeded each other fully demonstrated. Reports having reached him on the eleventh, while on the banks of the Monocacy, that Miles and White were strongly fortified at Harper's Ferry, and that the Confederates had made no, demonstrations in that direction, McClellan imagined that those generals were able to withstand a siege of many weeks, if so compelled, and t
From a general review of our operations between the time of Jackson's departure from Frederick on the eleventh and the surrender of Harper's Ferry on the fifteenth, and from an estimate of the forces and the distance of the two armies operating within so few miles of each other during that time, McClellan's tardiness of action, in the face of Jackson's small force and activity, seemed to me inexplicable. The advance posts of the Federal cavalry exchanged shots with ours on the banks of the Monocacy on the eleventh, and at that time the true state of affairs must have been known to Federal commanders, for Union sympathizers were numerous, and many escaped through our lines who could have given every information. On the twelfth, when Jackson had crossed into Virginia, and appeared before the enemy, strongly posted on the Bolivar Heights, numerous cavalry men had left Miles's command, who, doubtless, did fully inform McClellan of the contemplated investment of Harper's Ferry. Under the