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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 4: campaign of the Army of the Cumberland from Murfreesboro'to Chattanooga. (search)
ter crossing the boundary-line into Scott County, Tennessee, they were joined Aug. 28. by General Hartsuff and his corps; and the combined Pack-mules. this shows the manner of carrying commissary stores on mules, in the mountain regions. A long string of mules were tethered together by rope or chain, in tandem, the leader guided by a soldier or servant. forces pressed forward at the rate of twenty miles a day over the great and rugged plateau of the Cumberland Mountains to Montgomery, in Morgan County, where they were joined by a column of infantry, under Colonel Julius White. After brief rest, Carter's force pushed rapidly onward in three columns, one under Colonel Bird (accompanied by Burnside), for Kingston, at the mouth of the Clinch River, where communication was had with Colonel Minty's cavalry, of Rosecrans's extreme left; another, under General Shackelford, for Loudon Bridge, farther up the Tennessee; and a third, under Colonel Foster, for Knoxville, on the Holston Riv
spersing organized Federal bands existing there, and the removal or destruction of all supplies of which the enemy might avail himself if advancing from that direction. These troops, under the command of Colonel Vaughn, of the Third Tennessee Regiment, advanced as far as Huntsville, in Scott County, the column being fired upon all along the march by small parties from inaccessible points. Returning in the direction of Kingston a sharp skirmish occurred at a small village near Montgomery, in Morgan County, lasting about thirty minutes, in which the enemy was dispersed with a loss of 15 killed, a larger number wounded, and 7 prisoners. Our loss is 5 killed and 12 wounded. List of casualties omitted shows 1 officer and 4 men killed and 1 officer and 11 men wounded. The entire population of these counties is hostile to us, those able to bear arms being regularly organized as Home Guards. All loyal citizens have been expelled from the country. Respectfully, your obedient se
th his division, from Knoxville, advanced by Jacksonborough Aug. 22. across the Cumberland range, through Big Creek Gap, moving as rapidly as possible, with a very light train ; his men subsisting mainly on green corn — which is scarce enough in that poor, thinly-peopled region — his hungry, foot-sore, dusty followers buoyed up with the assurance of plenty and comfort ahead. His cavalry advance, 900 strong, under Col. J. S. Scott, moving Aug. 13. from Kingston, Tenn., passed through Montgomery and Jamestown, Tenn., and Monticello and Somerset, Ky., to London, where it surprised Aug. 17. and routed a battalion of Union cavalry, inflicting a loss of 30 killed and wounded and 111 prisoners; thence pushing on, making additional captures by the way, to Richmond, Ky.; thence falling back to rejoin Smith, who had not yet come up. The Cumberland Mountains are a broad range of table-land, some 2,000 feet in average height, descending sharply to the upper waters of the Tennessee and