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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 583 9 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 520 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 354 138 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 297 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 260 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 226 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 203 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 160 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 137 137 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 129 37 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: September 11, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) or search for Morris Island (South Carolina, United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 3 document sections:

ner--Frightful bombardment — evacuation of Morris Island by our troops. The Charleston Men interesting account of the evacuation of Morris Island and the terrific bombardment preceding it.y displayed from the deck of a monitor off Morris Island an immense calcium light, and several monill boats nightly patrol the waters between Morris Island and Fort Johnson. Col. Rhett's boat, returning from Morris Island to Charleston Saturday night, with Lieut. Jones, passed between several of ve steps from the ship. Evacuation of Morris Island. To sum up the events through which wePoint, the impossibility of longer holding Morris Island became apparent, and it was determined tharges were busily plying about this side of Morris Island to prevent the retreat of our men.--But foept. 7--2.40 A. M. All the garrison of Morris Island who came here have been shipped. Lieut. Hthe struggle. Thus ends the defence of Morris Island.--The issue has been foreseen since the en[3 more...]
of interest save that from Europe, which is given in another column. The latest dates from Charleston are to the 4th. A dispatch from Fortress Monroe says: The United States dispatch steamer Oleander just arrived, from off Charleston Sept. 4, reports "Sumter perfectly demolished," but the rebel flag still flying. Gen. Gillmore dug out and captured 75 men from their rifle pits in front of Fort Wagner last Tuesday. Everything is progressing favorably. A letter from Morris Island, dated August 30, states that deserters, several of whom reach our lines every day, represent that the people of Charleston are anxious to surrender the city, but Beauregard is determined to devote it to destruction. The shelling process caused general surprise, Beauregard having pledged his reputation that it was an impossibility, and mere Yankee bravado. It has been ascertained that the first shell fired from the marsh battery entered a house occupied by a number of officers,
From Charleston. Charleston, Sept. 10. --There was no firing last night, except from our batteries. The enemy is working hard on Morris Island. The prisoners taken in the assault on Sumter were landed in jail last night. All quiet this morning.