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An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 4 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 1 1 Browse Search
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ters and sought the Yankee lines. Following the example of Butler, Magruder set the contrabands to work on his chain of fortifications, extending from Yorktown (on the York River) south-westwardly along the banks of the shallow Warwick to Mulberry Point, on the James River — a distance of about nine miles. The distance from Yorktown to the head-waters of the Little Warwick was about five miles; the land was low, fiat, and marshy, unprofitable alike to friend or foe; but on the point where thwinter, the depth was generally not more than three feet. The character of these various works was admirable, and exactly suited to the topography of the immediate district. Yorktown itself, our left, was of immense strength, as was also Mulberry Point, the extremity of our right wing; Lee's Mills was considered the centre of the line. As the enemy would be necessarily obliged to cross or cut the various dams in approaching to attack, these points were protected by batteries of various cal
May 12. General McClellan, in camp at Roper's Church, Virginia, sent the following despatch to the War Department: Commander Rodgers writes me to-day that he went with the gunboats yesterday past Little Brandon. Every thing quiet and no signs of troops crossing the river. He found two batteries, of ten or twelve guns each, on the south side of James River; one opposite the mouth of the Warwick, the other about south-west from Mulberry Point. The upper battery, on Hardin's, or Mother Pine's Bluff, has heavy rifled pieces. Between the batteries lay the Jamestown and Yorktown. Commander Rodgers offered battle, but the gunboats moved off. He silenced one battery and ran past the other. Harvey Brown was confirmed as Brevet Brigadier-General in the United States army. President Lincoln issued a proclamation declaring that the blockade of the ports of Beaufort, Port Royal, and New Orleans shall so far cease and determine, from and after the first of June next, t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 14: movements of the Army of the Potomac.--the Monitor and Merrimack. (search)
d at Ship Point, on the York River. But when he perceived the strong force gathered at Fortress Monroe, he felt too weak to make a stand on his proposed line, and he prepared to receive McClellan on a second line, on Warwick River. He left a small body of troops on his first line and at Ship Point, and distributed his remaining force along a front of about thirteen miles. At Yorktown, on Gloucester Point opposite, and on Mulberry Island, on the James River, This was sometimes called Mulberry Point, for it is not actually an island now, the channel between it and the former main having been closed. he placed fixed garrisons, amounting in the aggregate to six thousand men, so that along a line of thirteen miles in front of McClellan's great army, there were only about five thousand Confederate soldiers behind incomplete earth-works. General McClellan estimated Magruder's force at from fifteen thousand to twenty thousand men, while the eight thousand troops under Huger at Norfolk, h
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 5 (search)
ns increased the army on the Peninsula to about fifty-three thousand men, including three thousand sick. It was opposed to a hundred and thirty-three thousand Federal soldiers. Franklin's division, of twelve thousand men, was kept on board of transports, in readiness to move up York River. Magruder's division formed the Confederate right wing, Longstreet's the centre, D. H. Hill's the left, and Smith's the reserve. The fieldworks at Gloucester Point and Yorktown, on the left flank, and Mulberry Point, on the right, were occupied by eight thousand men. In this position we had nothing to do but to finish the works begun, between Yorktown and the head of the inundations, and observe the enemy's operations. They were limited to a little skirmishing at long range, and daily cannonading, generally directed at Magruder's left, or Longstreet's right, and the construction of a long line of batteries in front of Yorktown, and beyond the range of our old-fashioned ship-guns. These batter
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), four years with General Lee --a Review by General C. M. Wilcox. (search)
. The Thirty-eighth Virginia, belonging to it, a twelve months regiment, was at the time being reorganized, remained behind and never rejoined. If the strength of the brigade is correctly given on the 21st of May, it should have been stronger the latter part (29th) of March when it joined General Magruder on the Peninsula. The morning of May 3d the brigade was moved to the front, and took position at various points along the line--one regiment, or the greater portion of it, being at Mulberry Point, on the James river, and a portion of one at the redoubts near Yorktown. I reported to General Magruder that morning that I had brought him 2,200 men. This number included, if remembered correctly, the Thomas artillery, a four-gun battery. The 2,616 must have been the aggregate present and absent. The present with the army, including detached and sick, would not have reached the numbers given in the return. In my report of the battle of Gaines' Mill, June 27th, 1862, the strength of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
at Fort Monroe that McClellan intended to try the Peninsula route, and orders were given to begin the transfer of Johnston's army from the Rappahannock to Yorktown. Meantime, to Magruder with 11,000 men was assigned the task of holding the Federal army in check until Johnston's forces could arrive. We believe that history records few operations more skilful or successful than those by which Magruder accomplished his task. Magruder's line stretched across the Peninsula from Yorktown to Mulberry Point on the James. With 6,000 of his men he garrisoned the extremities of his line, holding Gloucester Point and closing the York river by his batteries. The other 5,000 held the line of the Warwick creek, which he had converted into a formidable line of defense by the use of all the resources that nature and engineering skill had placed within his reach. On April 2 McClellan reached Fort Monroe, and finding 58,000 of his troops ready to move, he ordered this force forward on the 4th, leav
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Pennsylvania Volunteers. (search)
. Re serve Brigade, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to June, 1863. Reserve Brigade, 1st Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Potomac, to August, 1864. 3rd (Reserve) Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Cavalry Corps, Army of the Shenandoah and Army of the Potomac, to June, 1865. Service. Provost duty in the Defenses of Washington, D. C., till May, 1862. Scout to Hunter's Mills March 19. Moved to Fortress Monroe, thence to Yorktown, Va., May 3-5. Reconnoissance to Mulberry Point, Va., May 7-8 (Detachment). Reconnoissance to New Castle and Hanovertown Ferry May 22. Reconnoissance to Hanover C. H. May 24. Charge on picket line with lances May 25 (Co. C ). Hanover C. H. May 27 (Co. A ). Operations near Hanover C. H. May 27-29. Occupation of Ashland May 30. Reconnoissance to Hanover C. H. June 10-12. Operations about White House against Stuart June 13-15. Garlick's Landing, Pamunkey River, June 13. Seven days before Richmond June 25-Jul
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
55, 1; 96, 1 Miller, H. J.: Defenses of the Alleghenies, April, 1864 94, 1 Miller, Jacob: Price's Missouri Expedition, Aug. 29-Dec. 2, 1864 66, 1 Mitchell, L. H.: Chancellorsville Campaign, April 27-May 6, 1863 39, 3 Morell, George W.: Malvern Hill, Va., July 1, 1862 21, 10 Morgan, George W.: Cumberland Gap Campaign, March 28-June 18, 1862 118, 2 Morgan, James D.: Savannah, Ga., Dec. 11-21, 1864 90, 8 Morris, Robert, jr.: Mulberry Point, Va., May 7-8, 1862 19, 4, 5 Morris, Walter J.: Cassville, Ga., May 19-20, 1864 62, 7 Chickamauga, Ga., Sept. 19-20, 1863 47, 2, 3, 7 Marietta, Ga., June 10-July 3, 1864 96, 5 New Hope Church. Ga., 1864 90, 7 Perryville, Ky., Oct. 8, 1862 24, 4 Stone's River, Tenn., Dec. 31, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863 32, 1 Morrison, E. C.: Gettysburg, Pa., July 1-3, 1863 95, 1 Morton, J. St. Clair: Rosecrans, Fortress, Tenn. 112, 3 Mower, Joseph A.: H
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Index. (search)
150, D5 Muddy Run, Va. 16, 1; 23, 4, 23, 5; 44, 3; 74, 1; 85, 3; 87, 2; 100, 1; 137, B6 Mud Lake, Nev. Ter. 120, 1; 171 Mud River, W. Va. 140, H6; 141, C7 Mudtown, Ark. 10, 2 Mulberry Creek, Kans. 119, 1 Mulberry Point, Va. 18, 1, 18, 2; 19, 4, 19, 5; 93, 1; 100, 1; 137, G10 Reconnaissance, May 7-8, 1862 19, 4, 19, 5 Mulberry River, Ark. 160, H11 Muldraugh's Hill, Ky. 150, B9; 151, H9 Munfordville, Ky. 102, 1; 117, 1; 118, 1; 135-A;idge, May 20-23, 1862 64, 4; 86, 17 Hanover Court-House: May 23-24, 1862 21, 1, 21, 4, 21, 5 May 27, 1862 21, 2, 21, 3, 21, 11 Harrison's Landing, 1862 13, 3, 13, 4; 66, 7 Fort Monroe, to Williamsburg 18, 1 Mulberry Point, May 7-8, 1862 19, 4, 19, 5 New Bridge, June 5, 1862 21, 6 Seven-Days' battles, June 25-July 1, 1862 20, 1; 21, 7, 21, 8, 21, 10; 22, 1; 42, 3; 63, 8; 90, 9 Southeastern Virginia 16, 1; 17, 1 Stuart's Raid, June 13-1
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
energetic handling of his troops, making a great show and movement and clatter, held the corps commanders, to whom McClellan applied for aid in behalf of Porter, so fully occupied that they declared they could spare none. Of the devoted, loyal sons of Virginia who volunteered for her defense, none was more patriotic or heroic than John Bankhead Magruder. On the plains of Mexico he had won his first laurels. With consummate skill he fortified the historic peninsular from Yorktown to Mulberry Point, so that the foremost captain of the Federal army, with 100,000 men against 15,000, was halted and held at bay until Johnston's forces could march to the rescue. At Savage's station he attacked the rear guard of McClellan's army, and inflicted severe loss on the Federals. From that point he had moved with great alacrity to Timberlake's store, and was in position to deal a telling blow at Frazier's farm, when the order came to move to New Market. It does seem the irony of fate that he