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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First attack on Fort Fisher (search)
am, across from Mound Battery, was another artificial sand-hill, thirty feet in height, with four cannon upon it, and named Battery Buchanan. These constituted the defenses on Federal Point, and commanded the entrance to the Cape Fear river by New Inlet. About seven miles southwest from Fort Fisher, at Smithville, on the right of the old entrance to the Cape Fear, was Fort Johnson; and about a mile south of that was Fort Caswell. The latter and Fort Fisher were the principal guardians of thit was stated that the first object of the effort was to close the port of Wilmington, and the second was the capture of that city. He was instructed to debark the troops between the Cape Fear river and the sea, north of the north entrance (or New Inlet) to the river. Should the landing be effected while the Confederates still held Fort Fisher and the batteries guarding the entrance to the river, the troops were to intrench themselves, and, by co-operating with the navy, effect the reduction
April 23. Lieutenant Cushing, with a party of men belonging to the National gunboat Commodore Barney, with a small howitzer, visited Chuckatuck, Va., where he encountered and defeated forty rebel cavalrymen, killing two, and capturing three of their horses fully equipped. Lieutenant Cushing lost one man killed.--The British schooner St. George was captured off New Inlet, N. C., by the National steamer Mount Vernon.--The sloop Justina was captured off the Little Bahama Bank, by the gunboat Tioga.
April 24. Tuscumbia, Ala., was occupied by the National forces under General Dodge, after he had succeeded in driving from the place the rebels under Colonel Chalmers.--Four rebel schooners were captured off Mobile, Ala., by the gunboat De Soto, and two were captured while endeavoring to run into New Inlet, N. C., by the United States steamer State of Georgia.--Colonel Phillips encountered and defeated a party of rebels at Weber Falls, Ark., capturing all their camp equipage.--Skirmishing still continued in the vicinity of Suffolk, Va.--Philadelphia Inquirer, April 29. A body of rebels under Imboden and Jackson attacked a small Union force at Beverly, Va., the extreme outpost held by General Roberts. The place — which is in Tygert Valley, cast of Rich Mountain — was garrisoned by about one thousand Virginia loyalists, under Colonel Latham. The town is approached by two roads, known as the Buckhannon and Philippa pikes, from the west and north-west, and the Huttonsville ro
n four were captured, with several of their horses and mules. Colonel Street was among those pursued. He was subsequently discovered and chased, and pressed so hard, that he jumped from his horse, and hid himself in a swamp and undergrowth. In Street's saddle-bags were found the pay-roll of a company of the First Mississippi militia, as follows: One hundred and fifty men all told, twenty-two prisoners of war, forty-two absent without leave, and nine turned over to another company, leaving his present strength seventy-one men.--the British steamer Hebe was run ashore near New Inlet, N. C., and afterward destroyed by the United States steamer Niphon. One of the Niphon's boats was swamped, and her crew captured by the rebels, who lined the shore, firing on the boats charged with the destruction of the Hebe.--The Forty-seventh regiment of Massachusetts volunteers, under the command of Colonel Marsh, returned to Boston, from the seat of war.--the bombardment of Fort Sumter was continued.
November 8. The blockade-running steamers Cornubia and Robert E. Lee, with very valuable cargoes, were captured off the New Inlet, North-Carolina. Major-General Meade, from his headquarters near Rappahannock Station, Virginia, made the following report to the General-in-Chief: This morning, on advancing from Kelly's Ford, it was found that the enemy had retired during the night. The morning was so smoky that it was impossible to ascertain at Rappahannock Station the position of the enemy, and it was not till the arrival of the column from Kelly's Ford that it was definitely known the position at Rappahannock Station was evacuated. The army was put in motion, and the pursuit continued by the infantry to Brandy Station, and by the cavalry beyond. Major-General Sedgwick reports officially the capture of six guns, eight battle-flags, and over one thousand five hundred prisoners. Major-General French took over four hundred prisoners. General Sedgwick's loss was about thr
Doc. 204.-destruction of the Venus. Lieutenant Commanding Lamson's report. United States steamer Nansemond, off New-Inlet, Wilmington, N. C., October 21, 186. sir: I have the honor to report the capture and entire destruction of the blockade-runner Venus, from Nassau to Wilmington, with a cargo of lead, drugs, dry goods, bacon, and coffee. This morning at half-past 12 she attempted to run the blockade, but was discovered by this vessel, and after a short chase overhauled. When abeam I opened fire on her--one shot striking her foremast; another exploding in her wardroom; a third passing through forward, and killing one man; and a fourth striking under the guard near the water-line, knocking in an iron plate, and causing her to make water fast, she was run ashore. We boarded her at once, capturing her captain and twenty-two of her officers and crew. The United States steamer Niphon, Acting-Master J. B. Breck commanding, which was lying near where she went ashore, c
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 17: Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--the capture of Fort Fisher. (search)
et in height, with four cannon upon it, named Battery Buchanan. These constituted the defenses on Federal Point, and commanded the entrance to the Cape Fear, by New Inlet. About seven miles southwest from Fort Fisher, at Smithville, on the old entrance to the Cape Fear, was Fort Johnson; and about a mile south of that work was Fd the capture of that city. Butler was instructed to debark the troops on the main land between the Cape Fear River and the sea, north of the north entrance (or New Inlet) to the river. Should the landing be effected whilst the enemy still held Fort Fisher, and the batteries guarding the entrance to the river, the troops were to sharply defined as ever, and even the grass was not disturbed. A little more than ten hours afterward, Porter opened his guns upon the defenses at that entrance (New Inlet) to the Cape Fear River, consisting of Fort Fisher and Mound Battery. See note 4, page 478. Brief and feeble Mound Battery. this is from a sketch taken f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 18: capture of Fort Fisher, Wilmington, and Goldsboroa.--Sherman's March through the Carolinas.--Stoneman's last raid. (search)
hief had reconnoitered for himself. Although a greater part of the guns of Fort Fisher were dismounted, or otherwise disabled, the work itself was so slightly damaged that it could be readily repaired. But the Nationals had no use for it. The port of Wilmington was closed to blockade-runners; and the town itself was to be the next object of visitation by Terry and Porter. The latter immediately ordered Lieutenant-Commander R. Chandler, commanding the Maumee, to buoy out the channel of New Inlet, when several of the lighter draught vessels went into the Cape Fear River. He also dispatched the gallant Cushing, See page 472. who was then in command of the Monticello, to ascertain the state of affairs on the right bank of the river. Cushing soon reported success, by raising the National flag over Fort Caswell and Smithville, Lieutenant Cushing displayed blockade-runner signal-lights, and decoyed two of them under the guns of Fort Caswell, where they were captured. They were
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 49: first attack on Fort Fisher.--destruction of the confederate ram Albemarle, etc. (search)
will follow the landing of a large force under the guns of the Navy on the open beach north of New Inlet, to take possession and intrench across to Cape Fear River, the Navy to open such fire as is peventy-five. The sea-front was intended to prevent the enemy's vessels from running through New Inlet into Cape Fear River, or landing troops on Federal Point — an unnecessary precaution, since na, December 10, 1864. The chart plan of the proposed attack on the batteries of the enemy at New Inlet, mouth of Cape Fear River, will explain itself, but the order of taking position is as follows act, and they will keep off shore about twenty-five miles, or far enough not to be seen, with New Inlet bearing west, in about the latitude of 33 56, longitude 77 20; that will be the rendezvous. Ct at the withdrawal of the troops: North Atlantic Squadron, U. S. Flag-Ship Malvern, Off New Inlet, December 27, 1864. Sir-My dispatch of yesterday will give you an account of our operations
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
e if the sight is properly set, will assist very much in insuring accuracy of fire. David D. Porter, Rear-Admiral, Commanding North Atlantic Squadron. Rear-Admiral Porter's landing orders. [Landing Orders.]Flag-Ship Malvern, off New Inlet, N. C., January 15, 1865. The landing party will land out of gun-shot of the fort, and as fast as the boats get rid of their loads they will be shoved off, and the boat-keepers will pull off and hang to the stern of the Nansemond, which vessel w, January 17, 1865. Captain — In obedience to your order, I have the honor to make the following report concerning the part taken by the marine guard of this ship in the operations against the rebel Fort Fisher, commanding the entrance to New Inlet, N. C., on the 15th day of January, 1865. My command consisted of three sergeants, three corporals, and thirty-eight privates; and to prevent confusion in landing, the company was divided into four sections, each commanded by a non-commissioned
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