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H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
he ships were so much injured as to render it necessary for them to withdraw. The British loss was twenty killed, and more than fifty wounded. Ours was only two killed and six wounded. Perkins says two killed and six wounded. Holmes says six wounded, but makes no mention of any killed. The fleet sent to the attack of Baltimore, in 1814, consisted of forty sail, the largest of which were ships of the line, carrying an army of over six thousand combatants. The troops were landed at North Point, while sixteen of the bomb-vessels and frigates approached within reach of Fort McHenry, and commenced a bombardment which lasted twenty-five hours. During this attack, the enemy threw fifteen hundred shells, four hundred of which exploded within the walls of the fort, but without making any impression on either the strength of the work or the garrison, and the British were compelled to retire with much loss. In 1815, a squadron of British ships, stationed off the mouths of the Mississ
he story of Maryland is sad to the last degree, only relieved by the gallant men who left their homes to fight the battle of state rights when Maryland no longer furnished them a field on which they could maintain the rights their fathers left them. This was a fate doubly sad to the sons of the heroic men who, under the designation of the Maryland line, did so much in our Revolutionary struggle to secure the independence of the states; of the men who, at a later day, fought the battle of North Point; of the people of a land which had furnished so many heroes and statesmen, and gave the great Chief Justice Taney to the Supreme Court of the United States. Though Maryland did not become one of the Confederate States, she was endeared to the people thereof by many most enduring ties. Last in order, but first in cordiality, were the tender ministrations of her noble daughters to the sick and wounded prisoners who were carried through the streets of Baltimore; it is with shame we reme
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12, 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 1814 PensacolaNov. 7, 1814 Villere‘s Plantation (New Orleans)Dec. 23, 18 28, 1814 Fort ErieJuly 3, 1814 ChippewaJuly 5, 1814 ChamplainJuly 18 and 19, Lundy's Lane (Niagara Falls)July 25, 1814 Fort Mackinack (Mackinaw)Aug. 4, 1814 Fort ErieAug. 13-15, 1814 BladensburgAug. 24, 1814 PlattsburgSept. 11, 1814 North PointSept. 12, 1814 Fort McHenry (Bombardment of)Sept. 13, 1814 Fort BowerSept. 15, 1814 Fort Erie (Sortie from)Sept. 17, 1814 ChippewaOct. 15, 1814 Lyon's CreekOct. 19, 1814 PensacolaNov. 7, 1814 Villere's Plantation (New Orleans)Dec. 23,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, State of. (search)
London Statesman, would we throw a veil of oblivion over our transactions at Washington. The Cossacks spared Paris, but we spared not the capital of America. While Ross was crossing Maryland to the national capital a British fleet, under Commodore Gordon, went up the Potomac and plundered Alexandria, on the Virginia shore. The British retreated to their ships after desolating the capital, and, flushed with success, they attempted to capture Baltimore. Rose landed with 9,000 troops at North Point, 12 miles from Baltimore, on Sept. 12, and proceeded to march on the city, when he was confronted by an American force under General Stricker and driven back. Ross was killed, and his troops fled to their ships. At the same time the British fleet sailed up Patapsco Bay and bombarded Fort McHenry, that guarded Baltimore Harbor. They were repulsed, and ships and troops, discomfited, left the Chesapeake to operate on the more southern regions of the American coast. See Baltimore. It
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), North Point, battle of (search)
North Point, battle of The humiliating events of the capture of Washington in 1814 created intense excitement throughout the country, but were somewhat atoned for by the able defence of Baltimore, which soon afterwards occurred. On Sunday, July 11, the British fleet appeared off Patapsco Bay with a large force of land troops, under the command of General Ross. At sunrise the next morning he landed 9,000 troops at North Point, 12 miles above Baltimore, and at the same time the British fleet bombarded Fort McHenry (q. v.), which guarded the harbor of Baltimore, a city of 40,000 inhabitants at that time, and a place against which the British held a grudgatteries. The citizens had constructed a long line of fortifications on what afterwards became Patterson Park. Intelligence of the landing of the British at North Point produced great alarm in Baltimore. A large number of families, with such property as they could carry with them, fled to the country, and inns, for 100 miles n
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ross, Robert 1814- (search)
Ross, Robert 1814- Military officer; born in Ross Trevor, Devonshire, England; served as an officer of foot in Holland and in Egypt; was in the campaign in Spain under Sir John Moore, and commanded a brigade in the battles of Vittoria and the Pyrenees. He commanded the troops sent against Washington in August, 1814, and was successful; but attempting to cooperate with the British fleet in an attack on Baltimore, in September, he was slain near North Point, Md., Sept. 12, 1814, while riding towards that city, chatting gayly with an aide-de-camp. See Baltimore.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Maryland, (search)
h was garrisoned, break into the jail, whither some of the assailed had been taken, and in the riot General Lingan is killed and others left for dead......July 28, 1812 British Admiral Cockburn with four ships-of — the line and six frigates plunders and burns Frenchtown, Havre de Grace, Frederickstown, and Georgetown......March, 1813 Battle of Bladensburg, and capture of Washington by the British......Aug. 24, 1814 British advancing on Baltimore under General Ross are repulsed at North Point, General Ross is killed......Sept. 12, 1814 British fleet bombard Fort McHenry......Sept. 13, 1814 Francis S. Key, of Maryland, imprisoned on one of the British vessels, composes the Star-Spangled Banner......Sept. 13, 1814 Lancastrian school system introduced in Baltimore......1820 Act passed abolishing the old division into hundreds, as fiscal, military, and election districts, and making an election district the jurisdiction of the constable......1824 Act passed for prim
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), War of 1812, (search)
24, 1814 Nantucket Island stipulates with the British fleet to remain neutral......Aug. 31, 1814 Sloop-of-war Wasp sinks the British sloop Avon......Sept. 1, 1814 British General Prevost crosses the Canadian frontier towards Plattsburg, N. Y., with 12,000 veteran troops......Sept. 1, 1814 Fleet on Lake Champlain under Com. Thomas Macdonough defeats the British under Commodore Downie......Sept. 11, 1814 British approaching Baltimore, Md., under General Ross; he is killed at North Point......Sept. 12, 1814 They find the city too well fortified, and retire......Sept. 13, 1814 British fleet bombard Fort McHenry......Sept. 13, 1814 [During this attack Francis Scott Key wrote The Star-Spangled banner.] British attack on Fort Bowyer, Mobile Bay, repulsed......Sept. 15, 1814 Garrison at Fort Erie by a sortie break up the siege......Sept. 17, 1814 General Drummond raises the siege of Fort Erie......Sept. 21, 1814 Wasp captures the British brig Atlanta......
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
of Rocks, furnished the nucleus around which gathered the men thus dismissed by the police authorities. They formed the eight companies mustered into the service of the Confederate States by Lieutenant-Colonel George Deas. But the volunteer companies, the Baltimore City Guard, the Maryland Guard, the Independent Grays, were as well instructed, as well officered as any American volunteers ever are, and some of them had historical reputations to maintain, for their companies had fought at North Point. They, therefore, regarded themselves as superior to the undrilled crowd that Captain Johnson was licking into shape at Harper's Ferry, as they put it, and proceeded to Richmond, where they at once put themselves in accord with the Virginia authorities. Marylanders were to be embodied into three regiments, armed and mustered into the service of Virginia, who was to adopt them. In carrying out this plan Governor Letcher issued commissions to Francis Q. Thomas, ex-captain United States a
ty model and size — She is of 850 tons burthen, and is estimated to carry 1100 hogsheads of tobacco. The Virginia Dare left Baltimore in tow of the steamer George Peabody on Monday last, but had only gone a short distance when her hawser parted, because of the rough weather, and the steamer left her. Capt. Cole then put back to Baltimore and engaging a stammering, again started for this port; but having on very little freight, and the weather being rough, the tug had to let him go at North Point and run into land to escape the heavy sea.--That night the wind lulled, and the next morning the tug again took him in charge, but on reaching Annapolis, was once more compelled to cut loose from the good ship, and run into harbor to escape the gale. At his time Capt. Cole would have hoisted sail and bid the tug adieu, but for the fact that he would have been compelled to wait for the tow on getting into the Roads. The Virginia Dare is named after the first white child born in this
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