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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 158 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 32 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 28 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 18 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 14 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Report of Lieut. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, U. S. Army, commanding armies of the United States, of operations march, 1864-May, 1865. (search)
andria and pushed forward to Grand Ecore. On the morning of April 6 he moved from Grand Ecore. On the afternoon of the 7th his advance engaged the enemy near Pleasant Hill and drove him from the field. On the same afternoon the enemy made a stand eight miles beyond Pleasant Hill, but was again compelled to retreat. On the 8th, Pleasant Hill, but was again compelled to retreat. On the 8th, at Sabine Cross-Roads and Peach Hill, the enemy attacked and defeated his advance, capturing 19 pieces of artillery and an immense amount of transportation and stores. During the night General Banks fell back to Pleasant Hill, where another battle was fought on the 9th, and the enemy repulsed with great loss. During the night GenPleasant Hill, where another battle was fought on the 9th, and the enemy repulsed with great loss. During the night General Banks continued his retrograde movement to Grand Ecore, and thence to Alexandria, which he reached on the 27th of April. Here a serious difficulty arose in getting Admiral Porter's fleet, which accompanied the expedition, over the rapids, the water having fallen so much since they passed up as to prevent their return. At the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The Red River campaign. (search)
ouacked on Bayou St. Patrice, seven miles beyond Pleasant Hill, Ransom and Emory at Pleasant Hill, thirty-threePleasant Hill, thirty-three miles from Natchitoches, and A. J. Smith a day's march in their rear; the march of the infantry having been rere. A. J. Smith moved up to within two miles of Pleasant Hill. Banks sent Ransom forward with Emerson's brigas charge of Mouton's division on the left of the Pleasant Hill road, supported on his left by Major's and Bagbythe 9th of April, the army came into position at Pleasant Hill, where A. J. Smith had been left, and where whatposition, covering the retreat and approaches to Pleasant Hill, including the important cross-road to Blair's Landing on the Red River, Sixteen miles from Pleasant Hill and forty-five, by the river, above Grand Ecore. woops were completely paralyzed by the repulse at Pleasant Hill. (Italics mine.) In the letter already cited, Lurs later received the news of the misfortune at Pleasant Hill. The next morning Kilby Smith received written
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The navy in the Red River. (search)
to Grand Ecore, the obstruction had to be removed before the Confederates could recover the use of the river.--editors. across the channel, both ends resting upon the banks. Of the disastrous results of the battles of Sabine Cross-roads and Pleasant Hill, April 8th and 9th, the fleet were entirely ignorant until a courier reached Admiral Porter from General Banks stating that the army was falling back upon Grand Ecore. Signal was made for commanding officers to repair on board the flag-shir or five hours, and many of the actions heralded to the world during the late war were much less worthy of notice than this contest between two little gun-boats and twenty pieces of artillery, most of which had been captured from the army at Pleasant Hill [meaning Sabine Cross-roads]. On the 21st of May, the squadron and transports reached the Mississippi. And thus ended the Red River expedition, one of the most humiliating and disastrous that had to be recorded during the war. The vessel
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 6.49 (search)
Churchill, with his infantry under Tappan and Parsons joined Taylor that night. The next morning Taylor, advancing in force, found the enemy in position at Pleasant Hill. Our troops attacked with vigor and at first with success, but, exposing their right flank, were finally repulsed and thrown into confusion. The Missouri andered. The enemy recovered cannon which we had captured the day before, and two of our pieces with the dead and wounded were left on the field. Our repulse at Pleasant Hill was so complete and our command was so disorganized that had Banks followed up his success vigorously he would have met but feeble opposition to his advance oner the bars, made especially difficult this season by the unusual fall of the river. Our troops were completely paralyzed and disorganized by the repulse at Pleasant Hill, and the cavalry, worn by its long march from Texas, had been constantly engaged for three days, almost without food or forage. Before we could reorganize at
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 9: the Red River expedition. (search)
ce, driving them before him, until he had passed Pleasant Hill two or three miles, when he found the main body ck's Bayou, near Carroll's farm, nine miles from Pleasant Hill, and there Lee halted. His loss in the engagemehat the firing had ceased. Franklin advanced to Pleasant Hill and encamped, and there General Banks, who had rant Grove, he thought it prudent to fall back to Pleasant Hill, fifteen miles in the rear, for the Confederatesorce, and a line of battle was at once formed at Pleasant Hill to receive them. General Smith had arrived the ravine which ran north of the little village of Pleasant Hill; his Second, General Millan, in the center; and g a thickly-wooded acclivity half a mile west of Pleasant Hill, upon and around which the main body of the Unioallantly as they were pushed up the acclivity of Pleasant Hill, suffering heavily until they filed behind Shaw'at Sabine Cross Roads, followed by an order from Pleasant Hill for the troops and flotilla to fall back to Gran
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
Shreveport. Banks meets a reverse near Pleasant Hill. battle at Sabine cross Roads. Confederalace until Franklin's division had reached Pleasant Hill. Then, going to the front, and being ill- the Army when General Banks joined him at Pleasant Hill, but the latter went to the front without r this repulse, General Banks fell back to Pleasant Hill with his whole force, and was there joined the Federal Army, which, having halted at Pleasant Hill, was in a measure prepared to receive themon until night set in. What happened at Pleasant Hill would have happened at Sabine Cross Roads d the army one inch. The little village of Pleasant Hill was situated upon an eminence, the ground entioned. Notwithstanding the action at Pleasant Hill was a victory for the Union Army, it came llery in connection with the engagement at Pleasant Hill — only where the 25th New York battery, oft Banks should, at least, have remained at Pleasant Hill until the dead were buried, the wounded br[14 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
t between two little gun-boats and twenty pieces of artillery, most of which had been captured from Banks' army above Pleasant Hill. The attacking party of Confederates was the one that had pushed past General McClernand's corps with artillery, to lames Stone for not doing. From all we can learn, General Stone was untiring in his efforts to perform his duty at Pleasant Hill, yet at the close of the engagement he was removed from his position and General Dwight put in his place. It was neceneral Lee's fighting, having joined him with orders to press the fighting. From Lee he returned to General Banks at Pleasant Hill, and gave it as his opinion that Lee was in a dangerous position, at least eight miles from infantry support, in immecity into question. As I have shown, Colonel Shaw, of General Smith's command, reported to General Emory for duty at Pleasant Hill. As no one stood between Generals Banks and Smith--that is, with any authority to command General Smith--who but Gen
istance. Gen. A. L. Lee, scouting in advance to Pleasant Hill, 36 miles farther, found the enemy in force; whie on the morning of the 7th, reaching the van at Pleasant Hill before night. A rain that day, which had greatlll back unmolested during the night 15 miles, to Pleasant Hill: Gen. Emory covering the retreat, after burying herefore, should not, have been encountered. At Pleasant Hill, the case was somewhat altered., Gen. Smith had west of the gentle eminence and petty village of Pleasant Hill; though the bulk of our army was formed, and mossed, with strong reserves posted upon and around Pleasant Hill, to be used as circumstances should dictate. ed 45 miles in two days, to share the glories of Pleasant Hill. This was emphatically the soldiers' victory. y prisoners — and says that we fought and won at Pleasant Hill with 15,000 against 22,000 The simple fact that een this difficulty, and, on the battle-field of Pleasant Hill, while our troops awaited the Rebel onset, had s
Baton Rouge Georgia Landing Bayou Teche Fort Bisland Irish Bend Plains' Store assault on Port Hudson, May 27th assault on Port Hudson, June 14th Port Hudson Trenches Thibodeaux Brashear City Donaldsonville Sabine Cross Roads Pleasant Hill Cane River Cloutierville Alexandria Mansura Yellow Bayou Atchafalaya Berry ville Opequon Fisher's Hill Cedar Creek. Organized under General Order No. 5, dated at Washington, Jan. 5, 1863:--By direction of the President, the troopvision was left in the defenses of New Orleans. Upon the arrival of Bank's Army at Alexandria the Second Division was left there, while the First moved on and fought at Sabine Cross Roads. In addition to the battles of Sabine Cross Roads and Pleasant Hill, the corps was engaged in several minor actions while on this expedition. In July, 1864, the First and Second Divisions proceeded to New Orleans, and embarked for Virginia, leaving the rest of the corps in Louisiana. On arriving at Washin
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 14: the greatest battles of the war — list of victories and defeats — chronological list of battles with loss in each, Union and Confederate. (search)
a 173 1,099 381 1,653 Dec. 2 Walker's Ford, W. Va 9 43 12 64 Dec. 14 Bean's Station, Tenn 16 51 48 115 Dec. 29 Mossy Creek, Tenn 18 86 5 109 1864             Feb. 1-3 Bachelor's Creek, N. C 9 15 302 326 Feb. 6 Morton's Ford, Va 10 208 42 260 Feb. 20 Olustee, Fla 203 1,152 506 1,861 Feb. 27 Buzzard's Roost, Ga 17 272 -- 289 March 5 Yazoo City, Miss 21 89 21 131 April 3 Okolona, Ark 16 74 -- 90 April 8 Sabine Cross Roads, La 258 1,487 1,772 3,517 April 9 Pleasant Hill, La April 17-20 Plymouth, N. C 20 80 1,500 1,600 April 23 Cane River, La 40 160 -- 200 April 25 Marks's Mills, Ark 100 250 100 450 April 30 Jenkins's Ferry, Ark 64 378 86 528 May 1 Alexandria, La 23 67 21 111 May 5-31 Includes Rocky Face Ridge, May 5-9 (loss about 900); Resaca, May 13-15 (3,000); New Hope Church, May 25 (1,000); Pickett's Mills, May 27 (1,900); Dallas, May 28-31 (1,800); Adairsville, Cassville, Rome Cross Roads, etc.Atlanta Campaign, Ga Killed <
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