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o Newport News, Va., this morning, with a proposition giving the national troops twenty-four hours to leave, and announcing that in case the place was not vacated they would force them out. The gunboat Dale, of twenty guns, at once went up from Old Point. The Albatross and Penguin were also stationed there, while the Minnesota and seven gunboats at Old Point are ready to assist should Newport News really be attacked.--Baltimore American, July 29. Thanksgiving day was celebrated in the ConOld Point are ready to assist should Newport News really be attacked.--Baltimore American, July 29. Thanksgiving day was celebrated in the Confederate States, for the success of our arms and the deliverance of our homes from the menacing hordes that have hung upon our borders like wolves upon the outskirts of the forest. We are pleased to be able to state that the day was generally observed in Memphis in accordance with the spirit of the resolution, and we believe that every pulpit echoed the thankfulness that fills the public heart. --Memphis Appeal (Tenn.), July 30.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies, 1852. (search)
llences. He embraced his first opportunity of usefulness in the war by entering the service of the Sanitary Commission, in the latter part of 1861, as Inspector. Out of the few extracts from his letters which our space permits, the reader can gather somewhat of his spirit; but his keen wit, his prompt denunciation of abuses, and shrewd estimate of character, must be lost to all but his correspondents. Newport News, December 10, 1861. . . . . Where do you suppose the name of Old Point Comfort came from? The place is certainly old, and there is no question as to its being a point, but as to comfort, allons donc! . . . . We used to ride out on horseback, and visit about two regiments a day. The word riding reminds me of the condition to which three or four days of this business reduced me. You probably supposed, in the innocence of your heart, that the old and abominable rack of the Inquisition had been abolished, and no longer existed out of the Tower or such places. P
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
would have been exposed, and the constancy and discipline of the unengaged companies cannot be too highly commended. A detachment of fifteen cadets from the North Carolina Military Institute defended the howitzer under Lieutenant Hudnall, and acted with great coolness and determination. The Confederates had in all 1,200 men in the action. The enemy had the regiments of Colonel Duryea (Zouaves), Colonel Carr, Colonel Allen, Colonel Bendix, and Colonel Winthrop (Massachusetts), from Old Point Comfort, and five companies of Phelp's Regiment, from Newport News. We had never more than 300 actively engaged at any one time. The Confederate loss was eleven wounded—of these one mortally. The enemy must have lost some 300. I could not, without great disparagement of their courage, place their loss at a lower figure. D. H. Hill, Colonel First Regiment North Carolina Volunteers. Cruise of the C. S. Steamer Nashville. [from the Richmond, Va., dispatch, March 18, 1901.1 By Lie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
eceive a fire which their orders forbid them to return. Had a single company left its post our works would have been exposed, and the constancy and discipline of the unengaged companies cannot be too highly commended. A detachment of fifteen cadets from the North Carolina Military Institute defended the howitzer under Lieutenant Hudnall, and acted with great coolness and determination. The Confederates had in all 1,200 men in the action. The enemy had the regiments of Colonel Duryea (Zouaves), Colonel Carr, Colonel Allen, Colonel Bendix, and Colonel Winthrop (Massachusetts), from Old Point Comfort, and five companies of Phelp's Regiment, from Newport News. We had never more than 300 actively engaged at any one time. The Confederate loss was eleven wounded—of these one mortally. The enemy must have lost some 300. I could not, without great disparagement of their courage, place their loss at a lower figure. D. H. Hill, Colonel First Regiment North Carolina Volunteers
e o'clock, a loud shout from a steamer as she passed our wharves, up to the yard, broke on our ears, surprising and saddening all hearts. It proved to be the steamer Pawnee, which had brought from Washington a large reinforcement of troops for Old Point. She was said to have on board now 500. As she fastened to the wharf out poured her troops. In a few moments, the sound of scores of sledge hammers broke on our ears, as they spiked the cannon, battered them and attempted to render them uself the navy. The enemy took two of our young men prisoners last night. They were reconnoitering on their own account. Wright and Rogers, above referred to, bore dispatches to Commodore Macauley. The dispatches are supposed to be from Old Point, but I have not learned their contents. At one time Norfolk was in great danger of fire, but the wind changing no damage was done. The negroes are hard at work, and breastworks are being thrown up to prevent the " Cumberland" and "Paw
the assaulting companies sprung in front of his company, and waving his sword, cried to his men " Forward Company B, the day is ours" Just then one of the North Carolina boys bellowed out, "I can take that fellow down," and red, the officer fell dead at the crack of the musket; the ball had penetrated his heart. He had on a fine gold watch, a splendid sword, and eighty dollars in gold. He was formerly Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifth Regiment New York Volunteers, but being upon a visit at Old Point, volunteered impromptu to lead Company B. New York Third, and paid for his fun. We buried him at sunset. The Carolina boys behaved with all the coolness of veterans, and delivered a deadly fire upon the enemy, which drove them back across the creek. The Howitzer rifle cannon did dreadful work; the shot striking on the right flank would go entirely through to the left. (The enemy advanced by the right flank, and never formed line of battle) One of these shot went through and through a f
The Daily Dispatch: June 17, 1861., [Electronic resource], [from another correspondent of the Sun.] (search)
is thought from the scenes witnessed at Fortress Monroe that the battle was far more sanguinary in its effects than the latter version would indicate. They are still bringing in the killed and wounded by boats and other conveyances, as I close this letter. Associated Press account. The following account of the repulse was revised and corrected by Major General Butler for the Associated Press: Fortress Monroe, June 10. --This has been an exciting and sorrowful day at Old Point Comfort. General Butler having learned that the Confederates were forming an entrenched camp, with strong batteries, at Great Bethel, nine miles from Hampton, on the Yorktown road, he deemed it necessary to dislodge them. Accordingly movements were made last night from Fortress Monroe and Newport News.--About midnight Col. Duryea's Zouaves and Col. Townsend's Albany regiment crossed the river at Hampton by means of six large batteaux, manned by the Naval Brigade, and took up the line of
s to General Pierce, who was reported missing, is said to have reached Newport News-point in safety. He gave the order to charge on the battery, when the fearful havoc of his troops took place. [Correspondence of the Baltimore Sun.] Old Point Comfort, June 11. The first battle between the contending forces of the United States and the Confederate States has taken place, resulting in the defeat of the former. At midnight on Sunday about nineteen hundred men advanced from Newport News-point and three thousand from Old Point Comfort, with an arrangement to meet near Newmarket Bridge, where they would conjoin under the command of Brig. Gen. Pierce, of Mass., for the purpose of checking the incursions of a corps of Virginia dragoons who had arranged the pickets in the vicinity of Hampton. A part of the troops from Newport Newspoint mistaking the Federal troops for the Southern forces, at about three o'clock in the morning, opened fire on them, and killed several, be
ria and India might stand as two tolerably strong practical protests against that sort of policy. Besides, the force necessary to secure such enforced possession would seem to us rather too large to be conveniently spared. Moreover, we cannot exactly see what good purpose it would answer. Would a garrison in Peking make the Celestials behave any better in Canton? We must be allowed to have our doubts, unless it can be shown that the outlaws of California are overawed by the garrison of Old Point Comfort, or that the fortifications of Paris exercise a salutary influence upon the mob of Boston, Now, we understand China to have many thousands of miles of sea-coast, exclusive of gulf, navigable river, canal and lake coast. She is said to possess a population of 400,000,000. Her sea men, boatmen, and watermen of all descriptions, are said to be as numerous as the whole population of Germany. How, then, is any garrison left there by the Allies to prevent them from interrupting
lery officers, recently from Fortress Monroe, are among the missing in the defeat at Manassas. There was an alarm last night, and it is expected that Gen. Magruder will shortly make a demonstration in this direction. Col. Max Webber now commands in Hampton.--The regiments there have been drawn inside the entrenchments, which nearly surround the village. The Baltimore Sun, of Saturday, adds the following: The steamer Georgiana, Captain Pierson arrived yesterday morning from Old Point Comfort, with a few military and other passengers. On Wednesday night an expedition sent out from the fortress, found up Black river eleven small vessels, such as are used for the transportation of oysters, and burned ten of them. The other had some corn and bacon on board and that was taken to Hampton Roads. With the exception they had all been there since the enforcement of the blockade, and that one it was said bad thrice run the blockade with stores for the Confederates near Gre
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