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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) or search for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 6: siege of Knoxville.--operations on the coasts of the Carolinas and Georgia. (search)
preparations such, as it was believed, would surely lead to success. Other important movements were made in that Department, all tending to cripple the resisting power of the Confederates, who were now in a defensive attitude there. One of these occurred near Fort McAllister This was a strong earth-work built by the Confederates for the blockade of the Ogeechee, and to protect the railway bridge that spans it about ten miles south of Savannah. a few miles up the Ogeechee River from Ossabaw Sound, where the Confederate warsteamer Nashville, a former blockade-runner, See note 8, page 810, volume II. was lying under the guns of the fort, watching an opportunity to slip out to sea. Late in February, 1863. a squadron of monitors and mortar-vessels These consisted of the Passaic, Montauk, Ericsson, Patapsco, and Nahant, all monitors; three mortar-vessels, and gun-boats Seneca, Wissahickon, and Dawn. were at the mouth of the Ogeechee, where Commander J. L. Worden had been for so
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 15: Sherman's March to the sea.--Thomas's campaign in Middle Tennessee.--events in East Tennessee. (search)
erman and Howard reached Cheves's rice-mill, used as a signal station, where, for two days the officer in charge had been looking anxiously in the direction of Ossabaw Sound, for a Government steamer. Hazen and Fort McAllister were then exchanging shots, the former with the hope of thereby attracting the attention of the fleet. W Captain Williamson, told Howard that his scout, Captain Duncan, had passed the fort and communicated with Foster and Dahlgren, whom he then hourly expected in Ossabaw Sound. The capture of Fort McAllister was a brilliant ending of the Great March from the Chattahoochee to the sea, and crowned General Hazen with an unfading chaping Colonel Markland and twenty tons of letters and papers for the officers and men of Sherman's army.--See page 225, volume Il. He accompanied that officer to Ossabaw Sound, where, at noon, they had an interview with Admiral Dahlgren, on board the Harvest Moon. Sherman made arrangements for Foster to send him some heavy siege-guns