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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) or search for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
only against guns the largest of which were the 7-inch rifles in the bow and stern of the Merrimac, neither of which, it is clear, ever struck the Monitor in hull or turret. To determine this point. Commander John L. Worden was sent down to Ossabaw Sound to operate up the Great Ogeechee River and capture, if he could, a fort at Genesee Point, under cover of which the steamer Nashville was lying, fitted out as a privateer, and only waiting an opportunity to get to sea and prey upon Federal commerce. He was also instructed to destroy the railroad at that point, if successful in taking the fort and destroying the Nashville. Commander Worden arrived off the bar at Ossabaw Sound on January 24th, 1863, but a thick fog prevailed at the time, and the Montauk did not get under-way and stand up the river until the next morning. When just outside of the range of Fort McAllister's guns Worden again anchored, and was there joined by the gun-boats Seneca, Wissahickon; and Dawn. The enemy ha
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
his name frequently appears in the dispatches of the commander-in-chief as always doing well in whatever situation he was placed. The operations of the Navy were conducted all along the coast of South Carolina and in Florida, after the active and exciting raids in the harbor of Charleston. Several vessels were taken by the enemy: the Columbine, a captured river-boat, was retaken by the Confederates up the St. John's River, and the U. S. S. Water Witch captured by a number of boats in Ossabaw Sound after a gallant defence; but these were small mishaps, and to be expected in a large base of operations. The last mentioned might have been avoided by shifting the berth after dark, and keeping the watch at quarters in a place where a boarding expedition of the enemy was to have been expected. They were quite as fertile in expedients to destroy and capture as were tle Federal forces. Most of the officers of the Water Witch were wounded during the first of the attack, and Lieutenant-Co