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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman .. You can also browse the collection for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) or search for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
had prevented quick communication. General Schofield did not reach me till the army had got down to Gaylesville, about the 21st of October. It was at Ship's Gap that a courier brought me the cipher message from General Halleck which intimated that the authorities in Washington were willing I should undertake the march across Georgia to the sea. The translated dispatch named Horse-i-bar Sound as the point where the fleet would await my arrival. After much time I construed it to mean, Ossabaw Sound, below Savannah, which was correct. On the 16th I telegraphed to General Thomas, at Nashville: Send me Morgan's and Newton's old divisions. Reestablish the road, and I will follow Hood wherever he may go. I think he will move to Blue Mountain. We can maintain our men and animals on the country. General Thomas's reply was: NA<*>UVILLE, October 17, 1864--10.30 A. M. Major-General Sherman: Your dispatch from Ship's Gap, 5 P. M. of the 16th, just received. Schofield, w
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
osed to be waiting for us with supplies and clothing in Ossabaw Sound. General Howard had, some nights previously, sent onnal-officer above, and at the same time look out toward Ossabaw Sound, and across the Ogeechee River at Fort McAllister. Aboiends at the North generally: on Board Dandelion, Ossabaw Sound, December 13, 1864--11.50 P. M. To Son. E. M. Stanton, ring its entire garrison and stores. This opened to us Ossabaw Sound, and I pushed down to this gunboat to communicate with from Port Royal, expecting to find Admiral Dahlgren in Ossabaw Sound, and, hearing of the capture of Fort McAllister, he hadble. We accordingly steamed down the Ogeechee River to Ossabaw Sound, in hopes to meet Admiral Dahlgren, but he was not therh Admiral Dahlgren, I realize how admirably adapted are Ossabaw Sound and Ogeechee River to supply an army operating against tion at Rosedew that sea-going vessels now come through Ossabaw Sound and up the Ogeechee to the rear of my army, giving me a
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
ps in and about Savannah: [special field order no. 189.] headquarters military division of the Mississippi, in the field, Savannah, Georgia, December 23, 1864. Savannah, being now in our possession, the river partially cleared out, and measures having been taken to remove all obstructions, will at once be made a grand depot for future operations: 1. The chief-quartermaster, General Easton, will, after giving the necessary orders touching the transports in Ogeechee River and Ossabaw Sound, come in person to Savannah, and take possession of all public buildings, vacant storerooms, warehouses, etc., that may be now or hereafter needed for any department of the army. No rents will be paid by the Government of the United States during the war, and all buildings must be distributed according to the accustomed rules of the Quartermaster's Department, as though they were public property. 2. The chief commissary of subsistence, Colonel A. Beckwith, will transfer the grand dep