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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 20 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2 14 0 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 3 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 8 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 6 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) or search for Ossabaw Sound (Georgia, United States) in all documents.

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n earnest, and on the same day, October 13th, he issued full and detailed instructions to Halleck to provide supplies for Sherman on his arrival at the coast. Vessels should be got ready loaded with grain, ordnance-stores, and provisions;—say two hundred thousand rations of grain and fifty thousand rations of provision, and one hundred rounds of ammunition for that number of infantry. . . Soon after it is known that Sherman has started south, these vessels should sail, and rendezvous at Ossabaw Sound. I take it, the first supplies will have to be received by way of that river. In the same despatch he gave directions for the coopera-tion of Canby and Foster, and added: Information should be got to Sherman of all preparations made to meet him on the sea-coast. General Sherman was evidently unacquainted with the contents of these despatches when he wrote in his Memoirs, Vol. II., page 166, that November 2nd was the first time that General Grant assented to the march to the sea. T
false; Wilmington, however, was certainly stripped of its garrison, and the governors of five states were called upon for the reserves. Information also came from various sources that an attempt would be made to throw troops into Savannah. Ossabaw Sound, in that vicinity, was the point where it was expected Sherman would appear. Here supplies were waiting for him, and hither Grant sent a messenger with orders, to greet .him on his arrival. The inland fortifications were believed to be weakrom Thomas was received, dated: Six miles from Nashville, and giving full details of the victory. This day the good news came in fast, for despatches were also brought from Sherman. He had reached the coast, carried Fort McAllister, opened Ossabaw Sound, communicated with the fleet, and invested Savannah. On the 18th, Grant congratulated both his generals. To Sherman he wrote: I have just received.. and read, I need not tell you with how much gratification, your letter to General Halleck
enty miles from the sea. The Ogeechee river is at this point twelve or fifteen miles west of the Savannah, with which it runs generally parallel, emptying into Ossabaw sound. In the Ogeechee are many windings, and, at one of these, on the western bank, the rebels had erected a strong field-work, which they called Fort McAllister. rdered an expedition from Foster's command. It was now of vital importance to open communication with the fleet, supposed to be waiting with supplies in Tybee, Ossabaw, and Wassaw sounds; and, on the 13th of December, Sherman ordered a division of infantry, under Brigadier-General Hazen, to march down the west bank of the Ogeechnd Slocum to make all possible preparations, but not to assault the city during his absence. His return through the network of channels connecting Tybee and Ossabaw sounds was delayed by high winds and ebb tides, and on the 21st, he was met by a messenger from his own Headquarters, with the news that Savannah had been evacuated
of, i., 23. Ord, General E. O. C., in pursuit of rebels at Hatchie river, i. 118; succeeds McClernand before Vicksburg, 863; in command of Eighteenth corps, II., 465; captures Fort Harrison, III., 71; wounded, 71; succeeds Butler in command of army of the James, 329; before Petersburg, 452, 501; final assault on Petersburg, 501-516; parallel advance to Appomattox with Sheridan and Meade, 546, 556, 558, 578, 584; at Rice's station, 573; at Appomattox, 598; at surrender of Lee, 602. Ossabaw sound opened by Sherman, III., 263; Sherman's arrival at, 297. Osterhaus, General P. J., battle of Champion's hill, i., 262; assault on Vicksburg, 320; battle of Lookout mountain, 499. Paducah, seizure of? i., 11. Palmer, General I., movement against Weldon railroad, III., 226; movement to hinder reinforcement of Wilmington, 228, 235. Pamunkey river, crossing of, II., 263-268; topography of surrounding country, 267. Parke,: General J. G. at siege of Vicksburg, i., 358; in East