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Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 64 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 56 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 40 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 18 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 18 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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a little west of Hamburg, a point nineteen miles from Corinth, it takes its final bend to the north. Here, two affluents, Owl and Lick Creeks, flowing nearly parallel, somewhat north of east, from three to five miles apart, empty into the Tennessee. Owl Creek, uniting with Snake Creek, takes that name below their junction. It forms the northern limit of the ridge, which Lick Creek bounds on the south. These streams, rising some ten or twelve miles back, toward Corinth, were bordered near tdeep and frequent ravines draining into the two creeks; the side toward Lick Creek being precipitous, while that toward Owl Creek, though broken, is a gradual declivity. This plateau ends in abrupt hills, overlooking the narrow strip of river-bank;d field. Pittsburg Landing, a mere hamlet of three or four log-cabins, was situated about midway between the mouths of Owl and Lick Creeks, in the narrow and swampy bottom that here fringes the Tennessee. It was three or four miles below Hambur
ner, it being assumed that the enemy is in position about a mile in advance of Shiloh church, with its right resting on Owl Creek, and its left on Lick Creek: 1. The Third Corps, under Major-General Hardee, will advance as soon as practicable on thvanced positions, when it will be deployed in line of battle according to the nature of the ground, its left resting on Owl Creek, its right toward Lick Creek, supported on that flank by half of its cavalry; the left flank being supported by the othoad, before sunset. The cavalry with this wing will take position on the road to Savannah beyond Mickey's as far as Owl Creek, having advanced guards and pickets well to the front. The left wing of this corps will advance at the same time, also to turn the left flank of the enemy so as to cut off his line of retreat to the Tennessee River, and throw him back on Owl Creek, where he will be obliged to surrender. Every precaution must also be taken on our part to prevent unnecessary exposur
west of Shiloh church, where Lick Creek and Owl Creek approach most nearly, a space of about threed occupy his right. This line extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek. General Johnston had reached eplied: There is Lick Creek on my right, and Owl Creek on my left. These creeks effectually protecbrigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, a distance of somewhat over twas on the left, with its flank resting near Owl Creek. Hindman was intrusted with a division, comreston Pond commanded the left brigade, near Owl Creek, with an interval between him and Gibson. Ao the lane of General Meaks, on the north of Owl Creek, and the cavalry down toward our camp. Tg to the right and front, follows a ridge to Owl Creek, which it crosses by two bridges. This ridghe Purdy road as a guard to the bridges over Owl Creek. His Fourth Brigade, under Colonel Buckland extending from where the Purdy road crossed Owl Creek to the ford near the mouth of Lick Creek, wh
., when we were in possession of all his encampments between Owl and Lick Creeks but one. Nearly all of his field-artillery,chanced to be at the narrowest part of the peninsula between Owl and Lick Creeks. As it advanced, gaps were left on the flanrman's right, found such an interval between his left and Owl Creek. Nevertheless, he went at his work, sending back to Bragscribed. The ravine that fronted it descended rapidly to Owl Creek, spreading into a marsh filled with undergrowth and tangline went to pieces. At last, pressed back toward both Owl Creek and the River, these broken commands found safety by the of retreat to the Tennessee River, and throw him. back on Owl Creek,. where he will be obliged to surrender. It is seen thatease, while it is by no means certain that the right next Owl Creek could have been carried at all by direct attack. Shermanision drifted out of the battle, clinging to the banks of Owl Creek, keeping up, however, a desultory resistance to the disco
s ordered by General Ruggles to form on the extreme left, and rest my left on Owl Creek. While proceeding to execute this order, I was ordered to move by the rear oa mile, thus securing a strong position on an eminence in an open field, near Owl Creek, which we held until near the close of the conflict, against every effort theo headway in front, contented himself with trying to edge cautiously up along Owl Creek so as to turn the Confederate flank. He found this a perilous game, and at tt, Trabue's Kentucky Brigade had occupied McDowell's camps between Shiloh and Owl Creek, feasting and making themselves comfortable with the spoils of war. On the otement; that is, in three lines of battle, the first and second extending from Owl Creek on the left to Lick Creek on the right, a distance of about three miles, supp, until after 6 p. M., when we were in possession of all his encampments between Owl and Lick Creeks but one. Nearly all of his field artillery, about thirty (30) f
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The battle of Shiloh. (search)
ed would have taken him to the road from Pittsburg to Purdy, where it crosses Owl Creek, on the right of Sherman; but this is not where I had ordered him nor where Iese two roads intersect nearly a mile west of the crossing of the latter over Owl Creek, where our right rested. In this letter General Lew Wallace advises General and front of General Sherman's headquarters] and two guns on the left bank of Owl Creek [about 150 yards to the front]. The enemy appearing in large masses, and opening a battery to the front and right of the two guns, advanced across Owl Creek. I instructed Captain Waterhouse to retire the two guns to the position occupied by osition of our troops made a continuous line from Lick Creek, on the left, to Owl Creek, a branch of Snake Creek, on the right, facing nearly south, and possibly a lphotograph taken in 1884. Pittsburg Landing is nearly two miles to the left. Owl Creek empties from the left into Snake Creek, a short distance above the Bridge.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Shiloh reviewed. (search)
re runs nearly due north, on the north-west by Snake Creek and its tributary, Owl Creek, and on the south, or south-west, by a range of hills which immediately bordeally toward the battle-field. In these hills rise the eastern tributaries of Owl Creek, one of them called Oak Creek, extending half-way across the front or south sch divides the table-land into two main ridges. Tillman's Creek empties into Owl Creek half a mile above the Snake Creek bridge by which the division of Lew Wallaceface of the west ridge is further broken by larger branches which empty into Owl Creek. Tillman's Hollow, only about a mile long, is a marked feature in the topograand's First Brigade; the enemy's left then clinging a little to the bluffs of Owl Creek in that quarter, but yielding without a very stubborn resistance, chiefly becit. [See page 607.] He was on the road to and not far from the upper ford of Owl Creek, which would have brought him on the right flank of the Federal line, as it w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
pecting Buell daily; and the ground was admirable for defense. Indeed, his position was a natural stronghold. Flanked by Owl and Lick creeks, with their marshy margins, and with his front protected by a swampy valley, he occupied a quadrilateral o of his coming. His front line, composed of the Third corps and Gladden's brigade, was under Hardee, and extended from Owl Creek to Lick Creek, more than three miles. (see maps.) Hindman's division of two brigades occupied the center, Cleburne's br to turn the left flank of the enemy, so as to cut off his line of retreat to the Tennessee River and throw him back on Owl Creek, where he will be obliged to surrender. it is seen that, from the first, these orders were carried out in letter and s Sherman's route of retreat was marked by the thick-strewn corpses of his soldiers. At last, pressed back toward both Owl Creek and the River, Sherman and McClernand found safety by the interposition on their left flank of W. H. L. Wallace's fresh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.47 (search)
Gladden's division of Bragg's corps, constituted the advance, did not rest on Owl Creek, as prescribed. Nine thousand and twenty-four men were in this line, deployessailed occupied a continuous line from Lick Creek, on the [Federal] left, to Owl Creek, a branch of Snake Creek, on the [Federal] right, facing nearly south, and pottle west, says General Grant. Their first line, reaching from the bridge on Owl Creek to the Lick Creek ford, was held by the divisions of Generals Sherman and Pre odd guns. The ground occupied was an undulating table-land embraced between Owl Creek and Lick Creek, that run nearly in the same general direction and are about fasunder, come together two miles from Pittsburg. A road from Purdy, crossing Owl Creek by a bridge near Sherman's right, gave one way to reach the field from Crump'ched Sherman's division, owing to the failure of Hardee to keep his left near Owl Creek as was intended, only the left brigade of that division on the Federal right
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Surprise and withdrawal at Shiloh. (search)
s. The time consumed in gathering Prentiss's command together, in taking their arms, in marching them to the rear, was inestimably valuable. Not only that; the news of the capture spread, and grew as it spread; many soldiers and officers believed we had captured the bulk of the Federal army, and hundreds left their positions and came to see the captured Yanks. But after a while the Confederates were gotten into ranks, and a perfect line of battle was formed, with our left wing resting on Owl Creek and our right on the Tennessee River. General Polk was on the left, then Bragg, then Hardee, then Breckinridge. In our front only one single point was showing fight, a hill crowned with artillery. I was with General Bragg, and rode with him along the front of his corps. I heard him say over and over again, One more charge, my men, and we shall capture them all. While this was going on a staff-officer (or rather, I think, it was one of the detailed clerks of General Beauregard's headqua
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