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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 0 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 2, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Fannie A. Beers, Memories: a record of personal exeperience and adventure during four years of war. 2 0 Browse Search
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Your search returned 60 results in 26 document sections:

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
leon at Austerlitz, 247; at Waterloo, 278, 421; mentioned, 13, 17. Negro division at Petersburg, 356. New England States, 82. Newton, General, John, at Gettysburg, 286; mentioned, 362. Ney, Field-Marshal, 424. Nineteenth Corps, the, 352. Oates, Colonel, 282. On-to-Richmond movement, 327. Orange Court House, Va., 182, 183, 222, 320, 328. Ordinance of Secession, 87. Ordnance Department, the, 350. Ord's Eighteenth Corps, 359, 387. Ould, Judge, Robert, 76, 419. Palo Alto, battle of, 32. Paris, Count of, quoted, 53. Patterson, General, Robert, 38, 46, 103, 104, 105, 107, 109, 269. Paxton, General, killed at Chancellorsville, 257. Payne, General W. H., 375. Peace Conference, 86. Peck, General, 243. Pegram, General, John, 114, 115, 369. Pelham, Major, John, killed, 242. Pender's North Carolina brigade, 252. Pendleton, Edmund, 80. Pendleton, General W. N., 260, 276, 302, 293, 414. Perote, castle of, 40. Perry, Colonel Herman H., 390.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
n in the open ground between the woods and the river, from which he could reach their place of landing and their transports with his artillery fire. In this action the Union losses were 48 killed, 110 wounded, 28 missing; total, 186. The Confederate losses were 8 killed and 40 wounded; total, 48.--Editors. From this time the Confederates were more worried by the deep mud through which they were patiently trudging than they were by any movements of the Federals. In a letter to me from Palo Alto, on the Charles City road, dated Headquarters, Second Corps, May 8th, General Longstreet says: If your road can beat this for mud, I don't want to see it. If you see the General [Johnston] , say to him that we are as happy as larks over here, till we get 126 wagons [the total number] up to the hub at one time. I don't fear McClellan or any one in Yankeedom. When my command had passed the Baltimore Cross-roads, four and a half miles west of New Kent Court House, and had reached
urn to the Nueces forthwith, there to remain while our Governments are regulating the pending question relative to Texas; with a warning that his refusal would be regarded by Mexico as a declaration of war. Gen. Taylor courteously replied that he was acting under instructions that were incompatible with the Mexican's requirement. Ampudia was soon after superseded by Arista, who, early in May, crossed the Rio Grande at the head of 6,000 men, and, on the 8th, attacked Gen. Taylor's 2,300 at Palo Alto, and was badly defeated. Retreating to a strong position at Resaca de la Palma, a few miles distant, he was there attacked next day by Gen. Taylor, who routed his forces, after a sharp conflict, and drove them in disorder across the river. The Mexican loss in these two affairs was 1,000 men, with eight guns, and a large amount of baggage. The undisturbed possession of the entire left bank of the Rio Grande was among the spoils of victory. President Polk (May 11th) communicated some o
of Ky., appointed to attend the Panama Congress, 268-9. Andrew, Gov. John A., of Mass., a delegate to the Chicago Convention, 321; his correspondence with Mayor Brown, of Baltimore, 465-6. Andrews, T. A., of Phila., letter refusing the use of his hall to George W. Curtis, 367. Annapolis, Md., landing of Gen. Butler at, 469. Anthony, Henry B., of R. I., his speech on the crisis, 381-2; allusion to, 404. Archy, a fugitive slave in California, 218. Arista, Gen., defeated at Palo Alto, 187. Arkansas, legislative enslavement of free negroes in, 73; withdraws from the Democratic National Convention, 315; 341; secession of, and vote thereon, 348; population in 1860, 351; progress of secession in; Convention votes not to secede, 486; Ordinance of secession passed; the nature of her tenure to her soil; action of the conservatives, 487; seizure of Fort Smith, 488; testimony of Gen. Gantt in regard to Union sentiment in, 515. Arkansas Territory, organization of, 75; 108.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Forrest of operations against W. Sooy Smith in February, 1864. (search)
eral Richardson to move up all his force to the bridge across Line creek, eight miles of Starkville and four miles in my rear; also to Colonel Barteau to move across the Tombigbee, to keep on the flank, and, if possible, to gain the enemy's rear. I ordered Colonel Neely to move his (Richardson's) brigade at once, and to guard all the ferries and fords across Tibbee river from the mouth of Line creek to Tibbee station; sending Major-General Gholson and the State forces under his commond to Palo Alto, to watch any movement of the enemy from the direction of Houston. In making these necessary dispositions, my effective force in front of the enemy was reduced to Chalmers' division, my escort and two batteries. The enemy attacked Colonel Forrest at eight o'clock, and after a fight of two hours, were repulsed with considerable loss. The hastily improvised breastworks of rails and logs, thrown up by Colonel Forrest, greatly protected his men, and our casualties during this fight were sev
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
sident and the Endymion, Majestic, and two other British ships (former defeated,Sept. 16, 1814 Hornet and Penguin (latter defeated)Jan. 22, 1815 Black Hawk War. (See Black Hawk). May to August, 1832. Seminole War--1835-42. MicanopyJune 9, 1836 Fort DraneAug. 21, 1836 Wahoo SwampNov. 17, 18, and 21, Okeechobee LakeDec. 25, 1837 CarloosahatcheeJuly 23, 1839 Fort KingApril 28, 1840 Near Fort BrookeMar. 2, 1841 Big HammockApril 19, 1842 War against Mexico. Fort BrownMay 3, 1846 Palo AltoMay 8, 1846 Resaca de la PalmaMay 9, 1846 Sonoma and Sonoma PassJune 15, 1846 MontereySept. 21-23, 1846 BracetaDec. 25, 1846 San GabrielJan. 8, 1847 The MesaJan. 9, 1847 EncarnacionJan. 23, 1847 Buena VistaFeb. 22 and 23, ChihuahuaFeb. 28, 1847 Vera Cruz (Surrendered)Mar. 20, 1847 AlvaradoApril 2, 1847 Cerro GordoApril 18, 1847 ContrerasAug. 20, 1847 ChurubuscoAug. 20, 1847 El Molino del ReySept. 8, 1847 ChapultepecSept. 12-14, 1847 PueblaSept. and Oct., 1847 HuamantlaOct
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Mississippi, 1863 (search)
ction, HernandoILLINOIS--41st Infantry. OHIO--5th Cavalry; 15th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. WISCONSIN--12th and 33d Infantry. Union loss, 2 wounded. April 18-19: Skirmishes, New AlbanyILLINOIS--7th Cavalry. April 19: Action, Perry's Ferry, Coldwater RiverILLINOIS--41st Infantry. OHIO--5th Cavalry; 15th Indpt. Battery Light Arty. WISCONSIN--12th and 33d Infantry. Union loss, 5 killed, 12 wounded, 1 missing. Total, 18. April 19: Skirmish, PontotocIOWA--2d Cavalry. April 21-22: Skirmishes, Palo Alto and OkolonaILLINOIS--Battery "K" 1st Light Arty (Section). IOWA--2d Cavalry. Union loss, 6 missing. April 22: Passage of Vicksburg and Warrenton BatteriesDetachments from 11th, 20th, 31st and 45th Illinois Infantry, 23d Indiana Infantry and 7th Missouri Infantry, on Transports "Tigress," "Cheeseman," "Anglo Saxon," "Moderator," "Empire City," "Arizona," and 12 Barges. April 24: Skirmish, Newton StationILLINOIS--7th Cavalry. April 24: Skirmish, GarlandsvilleILLINOIS--6th and 7th Cavalry.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
n November, 1862, to January, 1863 (Section). Reconnoissance from Lagrange toward Colliersville, Tenn., November 5, 1862 (Section). Action at Ripley, Miss., December 23 (Section). Middleburg and near Bolivar, Tenn., December 24 (Section). At Lagrange and Memphis, Tenn., till April, 1863 (Section). Expedition from Lagrange March 8-13, 1863. Skirmishes at Covington March 9-10 (Section). Grierson's Expedition from Lagrange to Baton Rouge, La., April 17-May 2 (Section). Palo Alto and Okolona, Miss., April 21-22 (Section). Garlandsville, Miss., April 24 (Section). Union Church April 28 (Section). Brookhaven April 29 (Section). Wall's Post Office, La., May 1 (Section). Robert's Ford, Comite River, La., May 2 (Section). Plain's Store, La., May 21 (Section). Siege of Port Hudson, La., May 24-July 9 (Section). Clinton June 3-4 (Section). Jackson Cross Roads June 20 (Section). Moved from Port Hudson, La., to Memphis, Tenn., July 18-28 (Secti
hatchie River November 30. About Oxford December 1-3. Yocana River and Spring Dale Bridge December 3. Water Valley December 4. Coffeeville December 5. Expedition against Mobile & Ohio Railroad December 14-19. Ripley December 23-25. Prairie Station February 21, 1863. Davis Mills March 14 (Detachment). Expedition to Mount Pleasant, Miss., April 5-7. Grierson's Raid from LaGrange to Baton Rouge, La., April 17-May 2 (Detachment). Pontototoc, Miss., April 19. Palo Alto and Okolona April 21-22. Birmingham, Miss., April 24 (Detachment). Scout from LaGrange into Northern Mississippi April 29-May 5. Expedition from LaGrange to Panola, Miss., May 11-15. Walnut Hill and Pigeon Roost May 15. Tuskahoma May 15. Expedition from LaGrange to Senatobia, Miss., May 21-26. Senatobia May 23. Hernando May 28. Operations in West Mississippi June 15-22. Near Holly Springs June 16-17. Coldwater Bridge June 18 (Detachment). Matthews Ferry,
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States. (search)
demanded his passports and that she had refused to entertain negotiations, nevertheless persisted in asserting that the United States had forced war and that the military occupation by General Taylor was the beginning of it. The first act of actual hostility was made by Mexico in the attack upon Captain Thornton, and this was followed up by General Arista in the movements against Point Isabel and the attack at Fort Brown and the efforts to intercept General Taylor's march to its relief at Palo Alto May 8th and Resaca de la Palma May 9th. President Polk was just and candid in his message of May 11, 1846: As war exists, and, notwithstanding all our efforts to prevent it, exists by the act of Mexico herself, we are called upon, by every consideration of duty and patriotism, to vindicate with decision the honor, the rights and the interests of our country. The opposition endeavored to fasten upon this paragraph of President Polk's message the charge of insincerity, together with some
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