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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Potomac River (United States) or search for Potomac River (United States) in all documents.

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Doc. 28. a voyage down the Potomac. on board U. S. Transport Albany. Potomac River, Friday, August 30, 1861. To-day, at seven o'clock P. M., we left our moorings at Georgetown and proceeded slowly down the Potomac River to Alexandria, where it had previously been determined we were to lie at anchor till the succeeding daylight. This course was adopted in consequence of many of the various guides along the river having been destroyed by the secessionists, thereby rendering the navigaPotomac River to Alexandria, where it had previously been determined we were to lie at anchor till the succeeding daylight. This course was adopted in consequence of many of the various guides along the river having been destroyed by the secessionists, thereby rendering the navigation of the river extremely difficult at the present time. The scene generally, at the time of starting, was one beautiful to behold. On the left was Georgetown, with its multitudinous antique-like red brick houses, bent in the form of an arch, over nature's high hills; on the right Arlington Heights, capped with what, at that distance, seemed snow-white tents, cottage-houses, mansions, forts, fortifications of earth, leafy trees, and the vernal sod, and uniting these two beautiful pictures
united by the force of those arms of which you are a part, and the Union once more signify to the world the intent of that glorious motto, E Pluribus Unum. Then no longer shall be heard that fell doctrine of secession which would tear us asunder, and distract, part from part, this glorious Union; but we shall all be as we have been, one and inseparable, under the flag of our glorious nationality, won by our fathers, and preserved by you. (Applause.) Here is assembled, upon the banks of the Potomac, an army, the like of which the world has never seen. The motive which has gathered that army together never before was presented to the eye of history. It was congregated by no despotic order; it was the voluntary wish, the motive power, of every man composing it — the power of men rushing, as with one purpose, to reinstate the flag of our Union and save the Republic. That, soldiers, is your mission; and you have a commander who, with lightning speed, will lead you to conquest, and with
Doc. 225. skirmish at Dam no. 4, Potomac River, December 11, 1861. Sharpsburg, December 13, 1861. On the morning of the 11th instant heavy cannonading was heard in the vicinity of Dam No. 4, and about one o'clock P. M. a messenger arrived in haste for reinforcements, stating that the enemy had attacked the pickets and were endeavoring to demolish the Dam, by cannonading. When the enemy were first seen they appeared to be out on a scouting expedition, and Major Hubler immediately sent twenty-five men to a lock about one mile above the Dam, and so soon as the enemy arrived at that point they commenced firing on our pickets. They returned the fire, instantly killing four and wounding ten, three mortally. The enemy then fell back to a house about one mile from the river, when the men remaining at the Dam commenced firing on the house, killing three and wounding several. At this time the enemy retreated back to the woods, and after waiting some time, Capt. Williams, of Com
e office for another. At three, we pass a small schooner bound in, apparently a captured rebel with a prize crew aboard. The men-of-war, most of whom dislike unprofessional service, have been set to work towing, for we want to get the whole fleet outside tonight in readiness for the first breath of air that may come to help them along. As yet there is very little wind, all of it now the wrong way, and the best clipper in port might be puzzled to beat out against the strong flood-tide. The Potomac, our tow, is enjoying herself greatly. There is swell enough from the steamer's wheels to make her roll a little, and her bluff bows nod to us rather gracefully as she lifts herself on the wave, and yaws with the surge of the hawser. Poor old ship; it is her last voyage, and she does well to make the most of it. We drop her pretty soon, and return for another, passing through the fleet on our way, close enough to many of them to read the names painted in white on their square sterns, wh