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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Potomac River (United States) or search for Potomac River (United States) in all documents.

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As Virginia is to be the great battle-ground between the contending sections, and the first collision of arms is likely to take place on the banks of the Potomac, we hope that both parties will consent to respect one spot as sacred and neutral ground. Let the grave of Washington be still venerated by his countrymen of both sides, and let his ashes not be disturbed by the clash of hostile steel or the roar of cannon. Let there be one spot where the descendants of the men who fought under Marion and Sumter, Putnam and Greene, can meet without shedding each other's blood; and if ever an amicable settlement of this unhappy civil war is to be attempted, let us keep the holy ground of Mount Vernon dedicated to the purposes of peace, and there let the arbitrating convention, which sooner or later must treat on some terms for an adjustment of hostilities, meet for the purpose. Let the press, the only organ which can now speak to the people, South and North, claim from the leaders on
ins of his august ancestor, and has the legal right to remove them. But this will hardly suffice to stifle those emotions of indignation, and even horror, which will swell in every Northern heart at the shocking intelligence that the revered bones of our sainted Washington have been secretly extracted from his tomb, and hid away in some unknown and unhonored receptacle. Whatever may be the right of Colonel Washington, he has been guilty of an act of vandalism, which, for the first moment, will chill the blood of the North, and strike every one dumb with amazement. Up to this hour the North has had but one purpose — to vindicate the national flag; but never can she lay down her arms till Washington, the common property of the nation, reposes once more calmly in the tomb on the banks of the Potomac, which he so loved in life, and designated as lis final resting-place. Sacrilegious is the hand that has dared to violate the last wish of the Father of his Country.--Y. Herald, May 15.