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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 110 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 66 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 64 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 60 0 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 56 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 52 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 52 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 50 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 34 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 32 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Red River (Texas, United States) or search for Red River (Texas, United States) in all documents.

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James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Introduction — the Federal Navy and the blockade (search)
his staff, swept proudly up to the levee and received on board General Grant, with many of his officers. They were received with that warmth of feeling and hospitality that delights the heart of a sailor. Outwardly unmoved, Grant received the congratulations of the officers of the navy upon the greatest victory of the war so far — a victory which the river squadron had helped so materially to win. Again the Blackhawk steamed away on active service as Porter's flagship to lead the futile Red River expedition. following their success, had built the Gloire. The British were building four large broadside shins of the Warrior type; others were to follow in the Confederate navy, the Tennessee at Mobile, the Atlanta in Wassaw Sound, the Albemarle in the North Carolina sounds, and the formidable French-built Stonewall; but it was the Monitor which was to give the standard for future types. Said the London Times after the Hampton Roads fight, Whereas we had one hundred and forty-nine fir
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The organization of the Federal Navy (search)
two. In the war the American navy broke away from the old tradition that the effectiveness of a fighting-vessel is in proportion to the number of guns she carries. The distinct tendency became not to divide the weight she could safely bear among numerous guns of small caliber, but rather to have fewer guns of higher efficiency. Many of the small Federal gunboats carried 100-pounder rifles. the shores. The little boats, however, took their full share in the heavy fighting, and on the Red River, with Admiral Porter standing at her helm after the pilot had fallen, the Cricket, one of the smallest of these light-armored boats, fought one of the most valiant small naval contests of the war. Others of these boats won distinction in their actions against shore forces and heavier vessels. In spite of the number of ships built and equipped during the war, and the other heavy expenses which the War Department incurred, the total cost of the navy during the war was little over $314,000
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
trapped vessels to get free above the Falls at Alexandria, in the Red River expedition. Porter pronounced her turret all right but considerend the transport Black Hawk from capture during the return of the Red River expedition. The Osage was a later addition to the squadron; she he most powerful on the rivers. Porter took both with him up the Red River. On the return the Osage was making the descent with great diffisissippi. In May, 1863, she was with Admiral Porter on the first Red River expedition and distinguished herself in the action with Fort Beauregard. The next year she was in the second Red River expedition and shared with the other vessels the dangers of the return. She was one o city from the south. Admiral Farragut, who had come up from the Red River, requested General Alfred W. Ellet to let him have two of the ramleet to run the batteries in order to augment the blockade of the Red River. On March 25, 1863, Lieutenant-Colonel J. A. Ellet, in command o
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), On the Mississippi and adjacent waters (search)
, convoyed by Porter's gunboats, went up the Red River in the futile expedition, the object of whic transports below the falls On the second Red river expedition, in 1864, Alexandria was garrisonhe fleet under Admiral Porter started up the Red River from Vicksburg with the transports carrying avy was undertaken in the assurance that the Red River would, according to its custom, rise at thisderates had some formidable ironclads up the Red River, the gunboat Eastport was at last hauled oveof and twenty pieces of artillery. The Red River expedition Transports waiting for ted the loss of a fleet worth $2,000,000. The Red River expedition was one of the most humiliating ed of Acting Master A. R. Langthorne. On the Red River expedition came her great opportunity for diJuly. The expedition to Shreveport up the Red River, where the fleet under Porter cooperated witety. After Port Hudson fell, except for the Red River expedition, minor skirmishers, and the shell[3 more...]
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval chronology 1861-1865: important naval engagements of the Civil war March, 1861-June, 1865 (search)
ed by Federal ram Queen of the West, Col. Charles R. Ellet, near Fort Taylor, Red River. The Queen of the West, running aground near Gordon's Landing, Red River, fe April 1, 1863. Adml. Farragut's vessels proceeded to the mouth of the Red River. April 2, 1863. U. S. gunboat St. Clair disabled by Confederates abovunboats and guerrillas at Hickman, Ky. April 12, 1864. Adml. Porter's Red River fleet attacked at Blair's Plantation by 2000 Confed. infantry on shore, who Confederates in strong force attacked 3 of Adml. Porter's gunboats on the Red River. May, 1864. May 6, 1864. U. S. gunboat Commodore Jones blown up by April 24, 1865. Confed. ram Webb escapes past the Union fleet on the Red River; is run ashore below New Orleans, deserted, and blown up. May, 1865. Maccupied by Acting Rear-Adml. Thatcher. June, 1865. June 3, 1865. The Confed. ironclad Missouri, in Red River, surrenders to Lieut.-Comdr. W. E. Fitzhugh.