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the Confederate States, though the officers were later limited to the State of Texas. Because of the death of his daughter, Colonel Van Dorn gave Lieutenant-Colonel Reeve the privilege of going North. On May 10th, a brigade of Missouri State Militia at Camp Jackson, near St. Louis, Missouri, was taken by Captain Nathaniel Lyon, U. S. A., and the officers and men were paroled not to serve again during the war. Several hundred prisoners were taken by General George B. McClellan at Rich Mountain, Virginia, in July, and all were paroled, except two who had previously served in the United States army. These the War Department ordered General McClellan to retain. Then, on July 21, 1861, came the battle of Bull Run, or Manassas, when the Confederates took more than a thousand prisoners. The war was on in earnest. The Federal government was inclined to refuse to recognize the validity of the Texas paroles, and was only prevented from such action by the firmness of the officers themse
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
vacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21, 1861 Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 861 Santa Rosa IslandOct. 9, 1861 Ball's Bluff (Va.)Oct. 21, 1861 Port Royal Expedition (S. C.)Oct. to Nov., 1861 Belmont (Mo.)Nov. 7, 1861 Middle Creek (Ky.)Jan. 10, 1862 Fort Henry (Tenn.)Feb. 6, 1862 Roanoke Island (N. C.)Feb. 7 and 8, Fvacuated)April 14, 1861 Big Bethel (Va.)June 10, 1861 Booneville (Mo.)June 17, 1861 Carthage (Mo.)July 6, 1861 Rich Mountain (Va.)July 10, 1861 Bull Run (Va.) (first)July 21, 1861 Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 861 Santa Rosa IslandOct. 9, 1861 Ball's Bluff (Va.)Oct. 21, 1861 Port Royal Expedition (S. C.)Oct. to Nov., 1861 Belmont (Mo.)Nov. 7, 1861 Middle Creek (Ky.)Jan. 10, 1862 Fort Henry (Tenn.)Feb. 6, 1862 Roanoke Island (N. C.)Feb. 7 and 8,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Washington, John Augustine 1821- (search)
Washington, John Augustine 1821- Military officer; born in Blakely, Jefferson co., Va., May 3, 1821; great-great-grandnephew of George Washington; graduated at the University of Virginia in 1840; served as aide-de-camp, with the rank of lieutenant-colonel, on the staff of Gen. Robert E. Lee, at the beginning of the Civil War; and was killed in a skirmish near Rich Mountain, Va., Sept. 13, 1861.
, L, 360, 366; Il, 326; Fourth, I., 356, 358; Fifth, I., 356, 358; IX., 68, 71. Rhode Island,, U. S. S.: III., 342; VI., 105; officers on deck of, VI., 113. Rhodes, C. D.: IV., 46, 120, 132, 168, 186, 220, 322. Rhodes, J. F.: VII, 24, 50; opinion of, regarding the food and clothing of U. S. army, VIII., 56. Rice, A. V., X., 231. Rice. E. W. X., 205. Rice, J. C.: II, 253; III, 58; X., 139. Rice, S. A., X., 139. Rice, W., IX., 328, 329. Rich Mountain, Va.: I., 348; VII., 30. Richardson, A. D., VII., 146. Richardson, I. B.: I., 280, 325; II., 67, 72, 324, X., 131. Richardson, R. V., X., 297. Richardson, war correspondent, New York Tribune, General Sherman's reference to, VIII., 29. Richardson, Fort, Va. (see Fort Richardson near Savage Station, Va., and Fort Richardson, Arlington Heights, Va.). Richmond, Ky.: II., 322; losses at, X., 142, 156. Richmond, La., VI., 316. Richmond, Va.: I.,
Incidents of the war. --We copy the following from the Corinth correspondence of the Memphis A che: Within the last day of two a flag of truce, accompanied by Col. Pegram, (the hero of Rich Mountain, in Virginia, who, it will be remembered, was so long a prisoner in Fortresses Henry, Lafayette and Warren,) attended by an went to the vicinity of the enemy's lines. While transacting the business of the mission, a Federal General rude up, and after the usual formalities had been exchanged, made the inquiry of one of the officers: "How are you off for forage" "Oh, very, well," was the response, "you can judge so by the appearance of our animals." Federal General The Federal glanced his eye over the sleek sides of the horses, every one of which was in prima , and turning to remarked sotte voce, but in a tone that reached Confederate care. "They're a devilish sight better off than that's sure." The incident illustrates the point desire to make — namel