Your search returned 32 results in 8 document sections:

Ala., which he surprised at day-light, April 9. capturing 17 locomotives and a large number of passenger and freight-cars, beside a train which he had taken, with 159 prisoners, two hours before. Thus provided, he had uncontested possession of 100 miles of the Memphis and Charleston road before night, or from Stevenson on the east to Decatur on the west; seizing five more locomotives at Stevenson, and pushing on so far west as Tuseumbia, whence he sent an expedition so far south as Russelville, Ala., capturing and appropriating Confederate property on all hands, without the loss of a life. He took April 29. Bridgeport, Ala., with a force of five regiments, by striking rapidly and attacking from a quarter whence he was not looked for, driving out a force nearly equal in number to his own, with a loss of 72 killed and wounded, 350 prisoners, and 2 guns; while his own loss was inconsiderable. He was soon compelled, by the gathering of Rebel forces around him, to abandon Tuscumbi
erms of the unflinching courage and steadiness of his officers and men. Our loss is stated as follows: Sixty-fifth Indiana mounted infantry, two killed and six wounded; Fifth Indiana cavalry, five men killed, two officers and ten men wounded, and ten missing; Fourth Illinois cavalry, seven men wounded, eleven missing. Total, seven killed, twenty-three wounded, twenty-one missing. The report of Colonel Capron, of the Fourteenth Illinois cavalry, confirms the facts of the foregoing report, showing that the officers and men of his command twice repulsed the enemy, who charged with greatly superior force. The engagement began at ten A. M., and lasted until three P. M. They captured eighteen prisoners on the second and third of December. Bean Station, December 18, 1863. latest.--A reconnaissance to Morristown yesterday found the enemy in considerable (cavalry) force between that place and Russelville. There was some sharp skirmishing. We lost four killed and several wounded.
ur troops were mounted, and many of those who were mounted had mules that could not endure two consecutive days of travel. In this condition we moved, in the rear of General Dodge's forces, to Tuscumbia, Alabama, which place we reached on the twenty-fourth. Here worn-out mules and wagon-horses were received, but not enough to mount the command — there being between two and three hundred who had to go on foot. At three o'clock on the morning of the twenty-seventh the brigade started for Russelville, a distance of eighteen miles. The night was very dark, and the road covered with water from the recent heavy rains. In ascending a very steep hill through a cut that could not properly be called a road, with very deep ravines washed out on both sides, several mules, with their riders, were seen in the ravine struggling with little success to get out. None of the men were severely hurt, but their persons were completely covered with mud, and presented an unsightly appearance. The object
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Webber, Charles Wilkins 1819- (search)
Webber, Charles Wilkins 1819- Journalist; born in Russelville, Ky., May 29, 1819. He went to Texas when that Territory was struggling for independence (1838); was for several years connected with the Texan Rangers; returned to Kentucky, where he studied medicine; later entered Princeton Theological Seminary; and subsequently settled in New York and engaged in literary work. He contributed to The New world, The Democratic review, and The Sunday despatch; and was associate editor and joint proprietor of The Whig review. In 1849 he attempted to lead an exploring and mining expedition, but failed; in 1855 went to Central America, where he joined William Walker (q. v.) in Nicaragua. He was killed in a skirmish, April 11, 1856. He wrote Old Hicks the guide, or adventures in the Comanche country in search of a gold mine; The gold mines of the Gila, etc.
Roddy's command at Lagrange, where we captured Colonel Jim Warren, of the Tenth Alabama cavalry, and some other prisoners. About one P. M. we passed through Russelville, where we encountered another portion of Roddy's force, which had just arrived from Tuscumbia, and drove it out on the Tuscumbia road, while we kept on the Cotttempt was made to delay us by burning a bridge over Cedar Creek, but we found a ford, and caught up with the rear of the pontoon train at dark, ten miles beyond Russelville. We met no resistance, and our advanced guard rode through to the front of the train, which extended for five miles, and consisted of seventy-eight pontoon-b We returned via Tollgate and the old Military and Hackleburg roads, capturing an ambulance, with its guard, on the way, to within twenty-five miles south of Russelville, when I found that Roddy's force, and the so-called brigades of Biffles and Russel were already stationed in our front at Bear Creek, and on the Biler road towa
Roddy's command at Lagrange, where we captured Colonel Jim Warren, of the Tenth Alabama cavalry, and some other prisoners. About one P. M. we passed through Russelville, where we encountered another portion of Roddy's force, which had just arrived from Tuscumbia, and drove it out on the Tuscumbia road, while we kept on the Cotttempt was made to delay us by burning a bridge over Cedar Creek, but we found a ford, and caught up with the rear of the pontoon train at dark, ten miles beyond Russelville. We met no resistance, and our advanced guard rode through to the front of the train, which extended for five miles, and consisted of seventy-eight pontoon-b We returned via Tollgate and the old Military and Hackleburg roads, capturing an ambulance, with its guard, on the way, to within twenty-five miles south of Russelville, when I found that Roddy's force, and the so-called brigades of Biffles and Russel were already stationed in our front at Bear Creek, and on the Biler road towa
y the most easterly route, passing by Barton's station, Throgmorton's Mills, Russelville, Mount Hope, and Jasper, to Sanders' ferry, on the west fork of the Black Wah it should have ascended the mountain, was considerably delayed in reaching Russelville. From this place it marched directly south by the Tuscaloosa road till itur miles. March twenty-fourth. Marched through Frankfort to the right of Russelville, camping two miles south, distance thirty miles. March twenty-fifth. Stan Cane creek, twenty-five miles from Chickasaw. March twenty-third. Left Russelville to our right and camped at Newburg-distance thirty miles. Found plenty of cothe Fourth the left. The roads all led to the south-east, passing through Russelville and Jasper. The weather was pleasant, and the roads, though rough, were neved twenty-four miles, and at twelve M. arrived at the dilapidated village of Russelville, county-seat of Franklin county. It has been a place of some local importan
Mr. Breckinridge in Kentucky. Paducah, Ky., May 7. --John C. Breckinridge is on a speaking tour through this portion of the State. At Russelville, Princeton, Hopkinsville, and other points, large and enthusiastic Southern-Rights meetings are held, which he addresses with great effect.