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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
A. D. Streight by Gen. Nathan B. Forrest. Bragg at this time occupied with the army of Tennessee the Tullahoma line and Rosecrans was at Murfreesboro, both armies being quiet for the time, though their cavalry kept busy. On the night of April 26th, Colonel Streight set out from Tuscumbia, Ala., with 1,500 men, mostly mounted, with orders to cut the railroad in Georgia below Rome. He was promptly followed by a cavalry command under General Forrest. A battle was fought at Driver's gap, Sand mountain, in which Capt. W. H. Forrest, a brother of the general, was severely wounded—it was feared mortally, but he recovered and was in the field again in 1864. Streight, driven from this position, pushed on toward the Georgia line; but on the next day he was overtaken at Black creek, where after heavy skirmishing he crossed and burned the bridge, thus placing a deep and rapid stream between himself and pursuit. It was here that a young Alabama girl, Emma Sanson, mounting behind Forrest, at
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
t had made, and the bloody battles it had fought without apparent results. Though in its own country, it must depend on the railroad to Atlanta as a base, for northern Georgia was nearly destitute, as has been pointed out in another connection. On the 16th of August, Rosecrans put his army in motion to pass the Cumberland mountains and marched southward. Having crossed the Tennessee river in the vicinity of Stevenson and Bridgeport, Ala., the Federals found themselves confronted by Sand mountain, the northern extremity of which is known as Raccoon mountain. At the eastern base of this ridge runs Lookout creek, separating from Sand mountain the parallel ridge known as Lookout mountain, whose abrupt termination, where Lookout creek empties into the Tennessee, looms up in the sky just southwest of Chattanooga. Beyond Lookout mountain a valley runs in the same general direction, drained by Chattanooga creek, east of which is another parallel ridge, more passable, called Missionary