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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Minor operations of the South Atlantic squadron under Du Pont. (search)
ends along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida, from Bull's Bay to Fernandina. Detachments of vessels under Commander Drayton visited the inlets to the northward, including St. Helena Sound and the North and South Edisto, while other detachments, under Commanders John and C. R. P. Rodgers, examined the southerly waters, especially those about Tybee Roads and Wassaw and Ossabaw sounds. Nearly all the fortifications in these waters, with the exception of Fort Pulaski on the Savannah River, were found abandoned. The coast blockade was thus partially converted into an occupation. In March an expedition on a large scale proceeded farther south, to attack Fernandina and the neighboring posts; but before it reached the spot the greater part of the troops garrisoned there had been withdrawn, under an order of February 23d, issued by General R. E. Lee, at that time in command of the district. The expedition therefore met with little opposition, and occupied all important poin
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 15.100 (search)
lly, if at all, affect the regular daily progress of Sherman's main forces. If General Sherman purposed crossing the Savannah River, and thus reaching the sea-coast of South Carolina, he abandoned such intention after the defeat of Hatch's forces at Honey Hill. Sherman's army continued to move down the Savannah River on the Georgia side. About fifteen thousand Confederate troops from. the Carolinas had reached Savannah, and General Hardee sent large detachments out on the Georgia Central Rhe line occupied by my command — about two thousand men — was about three miles above the city, and extended from the Savannah River to the Ogeechee Canal. This line was nearly two and a half miles in length. Batteries had been constructed at the C capture of Fort McAllister, on the Altamaha River, effected a permanent lodgment on Hutchinson's Island, crossed the Savannah River, and established works on the South Carolina shore, almost within range of our only line of retreat. At my suggest
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The failure to capture Hardee. (search)
eorgia, and Florida, on the 28th of September, 1864:, succeeding Major-General Samuel Jones.--editors. who had urgently asked for his presence. When he arrived in Charleston Sherman vas close to Savannah, the end of his march to the sea. Here he lost an easy and brilliant opportunity to capture, with that city, Hardee's entire command of about 10,000 men. In his Memoirs he writes (Vol. II., p. 204) that General Slocum wanted to transfer a whole corps to the South Carolina bank of the Savannah River, the object being to cut off Hardee's retreat. At that time Hardee's only line of retreat was at Screven's Ferry to a causeway, over two miles in length, on the South Carolina bank. Without a pontoon-bridge or other means of getting away, he was relying only on three very small steamboats. The only troops he had on the Carolina bank were a small force of light artillery and Ferguson's brigade of Wheeler's cavalry, numbering not more than 1000 men. At this time Beauregard's Military di
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Sherman's march from Savannah to Bentonville. (search)
eral Beauregard could arrive with reinforcements from the West. I see no cause for depression or despondency, but abundant reason for renewed exertion and unyielding resistance. With great respect, your Excellency's obedient servant, R. E. Lee, General. [Printed from the Ms.]--editors. The right wing, with the exception of Corse's division of the Seventeenth Corps, moved via Hilton Head to Beaufort. The left wing with Corse's division and the cavalry moved up the west bank of the Savannah River to Sister's Ferry, distant about forty miles from Savannah. Sherman's plan was similar to that adopted on leaving Atlanta. When Fort McAllister. From a War-time sketch. the army had started from Atlanta, the right wing had moved direct toward Macon and the left toward Augusta. Both cities were occupied by Confederate troops. The movements of our army had caused the Confederate authorities at each of these important cities to demand not only the retention of the troops at each pla
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The battle of Bentonville. (search)
se before Franklin, was, with its shattered columns, in rear instead of in front of Sherman's advancing forces, and thus he was allowed to make his march to Savannah a mere holiday excursion. At this latter point there was no adequate force to oppose him, and when Hardee, who commanded there, withdrew, the city fell an easy prey. The situation then was as follows: Sherman had established a new base, where communication with the sea was open to him, while Hardee's line extended from the Savannah River to James Island, beyond Charleston, a distance of 115 miles. Outside of the garrison of Charleston he had but a handful of unorganized troops to hold this long line, and our true policy then would have been to abandon Charleston, to concentrate every available man in front of Sherman, and to dispute the passage of the rivers and swamps which were in his line of march, and which offered most admirable positions for an inferior force to strike a superior one. The garrison of Charleston co
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 18.115 (search)
tirely of men from my brigade, it should be constituted of details from all five. I thought this the best plan to allay any feeling of jealousy that might arise, and insure a more perfect vigilance, as I felt persuaded that these details would all carefully watch each other. My suggestion was adopted. Nearly the entire guard was kept constantly on duty, day and night, and a majority of the whole escort was usually about the wagons at every halt, closely inspecting the guard. At the Savannah River, Mr. Davis ordered that the silver coin, amounting to one hundred and eight or ten thousand dollars, be paid to the troops in partial discharge of the arrears of pay due them. The quartermasters of the several brigades were engaged during the entire night in counting out the money, and until early dawn a throng of soldiers surrounded the little cabin where they were dividing the pile into their respective quotas. The sight of so much money seemed to banish sleep. My brigade received t