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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
ssels before they could have been pointed fairly and reached the entrance to Scull Creek. The log-book of the Bienville states: At 10:30 the flag-ship winded the ling to pass out, Tattnall's gun-boats were seen approaching from the mouth of Scull Creek. The Bienville was at once pointed in that direction, and opened fire from the shells began to fall among the gun-boats they turned and stood up toward Scull Creek. Here the Bienville could not safely follow them, as she drew over sixteen ble should they advance farther. They then entered the intricate channel to Scull Creek and disappeared behind a wooded point, after which the Seneca, with other ves ; but, being confronted by one small gun-boat, he thought it best to enter Scull Creek, where at least he would be available for carrying off the Southern troops, ng up toward Beaufort, and mine by other steamers taking the passage through Scull Creek toward the ferry landing. Why they did not adopt this course must be left t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
eauregard--the fort on Bay Point. The greater part of the guns of Fort Walker were presented upon two water-fronts, and the flanks were but slightly guarded, especially on the north, on which side the approach of an enemy had not been looked for. A fleet of the enemy — consisting of seven steamers, armed, but to what extent I was not informed further than that they carried rifle-guns — occupied the northern portion of the harbor, and stretched along from the mouth of Beaufort River to Scull Creek. It was high water on the 7th instant at 11h. 35m. A. M. by the tables of the Coast Survey. These circumstances — the superiority of Fort Walker and its weakness on the northern flank, the presence of the rebel fleet, and the flood-tide of the morning — decided the plan of attack and the order of battle. The order of battle comprised a main squadron ranged in line ahead, and a flanking squadron, which was to be thrown off on the northern section of the harbor, to engage the enem
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
eauregard--the fort on Bay Point. The greater part of the guns of Fort Walker were presented upon two water-fronts, and the flanks were but slightly guarded, especially on the north, on which side the approach of an enemy had not been looked for. A fleet of the enemy — consisting of seven steamers, armed, but to what extent I was not informed further than that they carried rifle-guns — occupied the northern portion of the harbor, and stretched along from the mouth of Beaufort River to Scull Creek. It was high water on the 7th instant at 11h. 35m. A. M. by the tables of the Coast Survey. These circumstances — the superiority of Fort Walker and its weakness on the northern flank, the presence of the rebel fleet, and the flood-tide of the morning — decided the plan of attack and the order of battle. The order of battle comprised a main squadron ranged in line ahead, and a flanking squadron, which was to be thrown off on the northern section of the harbor, to engage the enem
at an early day, so that one may be placed on Martin's Industry, and the other at another important point. The surveying steamer Vixen, with Captain Boutelle, is now engaged in laying out buoys at the entrance of, and in the harbor. This work will soon be completed, and no difficulty will be experienced by masters of vessels in getting into the harbor by aid of the chart, although there will be pilots to brings all vessels in. The Ottawa, in command of Commander Stevens, is covering Scull Creek, and thus the water communication between Savannah and Charleston is effectually cut off. This will cause a great deal of trouble and annoyance to the rebels, as the railroad between the cities of Savannah and Charleston is miserable enough, and not capable of doing the business that will now be demanded of it. Another account: by an officer of the frigate Pawnee. steam-frigate Pawnee, Port Royal Bay, November 11, 1861. Our gunboats went up to Beaufort yesterday, land found th
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: the Port Royal expedition. (search)
was again headed toward them from a position just reached north of Fort Walker, and on her opening fire, they entered Scull Creek, the entrance to which has no great depth and is intricate; it is situated four miles northwest of Fort Walker. Ths misinformed as to a steamer and boats sounding north of Fort Walker. The Seneca was returning from the direction of Scull Creek, as near to the shore as the depth of water would allow, and as usual, men were sounding on each side of the vessel. n before, that the Confederate troops could escape from Hilton Head Island by means of the steamboats that had entered Scull Creek, there being a wharf about one mile from the entrance. It was supposed, naturally enough, with a march which General Drayton gives as six miles from the fort to the wharf, that before a force could get through the intricate channel of Scull Creek, the embarkation would have been completed, which was not the case, however, as we learn from General Drayton's report
he enemy. She left the vicinity of the batteries at 2 o'clock, and reports the engagement with the fleet still progressing. Only seven vessels had passed our batteries. Water communication with Charleston had been cut off by the blockade at Scull Creek. Reinforcements are being sent from South Carolina and Georgia. Wilson's regiment of 1,000 men leaves Tybee to-night. [Third Dispatch] Savannah, Nov. 7. --The steamer Savannah arrived about 6 o'clock P. M., having been struck thn boat, which was burned. Shells were observed from here to burst in the woods. Our communication is cut off completely, unless more troops are sent here with artillery and cavalry. Four ships are now in sight over the land and up as far as Scull Creek. Excitement in Beaufort, S. C. The Charleston Courier publishes the following letter from its correspondent at Beaufort, S. C., dated November 5: Yesterday morning, the steamer Edisto, from Savannah, arrived here and brought int
erner, of the German Artillery, was in command of the fort. Gen. Drayton was also present throughout the fight, and Gen. Ripley arrived about 10 o'clock. Com. Tatnall's fleet was present aiding the fort to the full extent of its powers, and all are loud in their praise of the intrepidity and daring of its heroic commander. Of his fleet, the Lady Davis and the Huntress were cut off and went on the Charleston. Com. Tatnall, after his flag ship was crippled by a shell, retired to Scull Creek, and landed his marines and powder to give aid to the fort; but before reaching it he discovered the United States flag flying on the hospital; he then retraced his steps to his steamer. The garrison at Bay Point, commanded by Captain Stephen Elliott, made good their escape, and at last accounts were engaged in throwing up a batttery at Port Royal Ferry, near Beaufort. Capt. Wm. Elliott's company, which garrisoned the work on Braddock's Point, south end of the island, retreated
ort Royal Harbor Nov. 9, 1861. Sir: --Since writing my official dispatch, I have sent gun-boats to take possession of Beaufort, to protect the inhabitant; but I regret to say they have fled, and the town is abandoned to the negroes, reported to me as in a lawless condition. The light vessels which I had hoped to save were destroyed on the desertion of the forts by the Confederates. The post-offices were visited, and a number of documents, letters, &c., obtained I have covered Scull Creek, mouth or Broad river, and have cut off the communication between Charleston and Savannah. Respectfully, your obedient servant, S. F. DuPony, Flag Omeer Command'g South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gidson Welies, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Important from Washington--two millions dollars worth of cotton seized at Beaufort--South Carolinian Professing loyalty to the Federal Government. Washington, Nov. 14 --The general order of Secretary Weles, announcing t
ved they would follow the gun-boats. A ship, which the rebels had sunk in the channel in the rear of Fort Pulaski, had been removed, several steamers, including the Mayflower, having taken part in the task of pulling her out.-- Piles, which the rebels had driven to prevent the passage of our gun-boats, had also been removed, by drawing them out or sawing them off. The third battalion of the Massachusetts cavalry regiment was stationed on Hilton Head, near Seabrook, on the borders of Scull creek Colonel Williams had his headquarters there, and the first battalion, recently at Annapolis, was expected at the same place. The horses of the regiment were landed in good condition, and the men are in good health and spirits. They have pitched their tents in a pleasant and healthy place. The second battalion is at Beaufort, with Gen. Stevents's brigade. Lieutenant Colonel Sargent is with them. There are no other cavalry corps with Gen. Sherman's command. Gen. Sherman had a gran