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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
may, 1864. 10. Manual of military surgeons. By Dr. John Ordronaux. 11. The war in the United States. By Ferdinand Lecomte, Lieutenant-Colonel Swiss Confederation. 12. Our naval school and naval officers. Meade. 13. How to become a successful engineer. By Bernard Stuart. 14. The hand-book of artillery. By Major Joseph Roberts, United States Artillery. 15. Company drill and bayonet Fencing. By Colonel J. Monroe, United States Army. 16. General Todleben's History of the defence of Sebastopol. We regret that our space will not allow us at present to review each one of these books, which make a most valuable addition to a military library. General Barnard's books are very valuable for a study of the campaigns of which they treat — albeit there are many things in them on which we would take issue with him. General McClellan's report is invaluable to the student of his campaigns, and (though full of most exaggerated estimates of the force opposed to him) shows him to have
of Agincourt; never Oliver Cromwell on the fields of Marston Moor and Naseby; never Sarsfield on the banks of the Boyne. The glories and honors of Sir Colin Campbell are the glories of the British race and of the races of Great Britain and Ireland from whom we are descended. But what gained Sir Colin Campbell the opportunity to achieve those glorious results in India? Remember that, and let us see what it was. On one of those bloody battles fought by the British before the Fortress of Sebastopol — in the midst of the perils, the most perilous of all the battle-fields England ever encountered in Europe, in one of the bloody charges of the Russian cavalry there was an officer, a man who felt and possessed sufficient confidence in the troops he commanded and in the authority of his own voice and example, received that charge, not in the ordinary, commonplace, and accustomed manner, by forming his troops into a hollow square, and thus arresting the charge, but by forming into two dive
the sea, proceed against the Russian left wing, draw the attention of the Russians to it, and force them to make a detachment in this direction. 3d. The division of Bosquet, 6750 men, to attack the Russian right wing at 5.30. 4th. The divisions of Canrobert, Napoleon and Forey, to advance at 6 o'clock, when the whole Russian force is completely engaged, turn the Russian right wing, attack the regiment Uglitz, and establish itself on the Russian lines of retreat. With 21,000 French on their line of retreat, to which the Russians had not one man to oppose, with 33,000 English and French in front, and 6000 Turks on their left flank, all attacking at the same time and all in communication, it Battle of the Alma. Battle of Wagram. is probable that the Russians would have been obliged to surrender. Sebastopol would have been the easy trophy of the victors, as it was without garrison at the time of the battle, after which only it was supplied from the army of Menschikoff.
and kept below that which the breech of the gun can bear, whilst an accumulating, safe, and efficient momentum is communicated to the ball, producing the precise effects of gunnery. The inventor of the monster gun at Fortress Monroe has a powder made expressly for it on these principles: It is very coarse-grained, or it is made in perforated cakes, to secure the results just mentioned. But although the most perfect explosive article for war, it is wasted on a grand scale. In one day at Sebastopol the Russians fired 13,000 rounds of shot and shell, and the only result was the wounding of three men. At Ciudad Rodrigo, 74,987 pounds of gunpowder were consumed in thirty hours and a half; at Badajoz, 228,830 pounds in 104 hours, and this from the great guns only. I appeal to you, Messrs. Editors, should not the Secretary furnish all possible facilities to the Confederacy for manufacturing gun-cotton! In order to prevent the manufacture of fulminating mercury for percussion powder an
laces in mid-channel. On these, natural advantages have been brought to bear time finest engineering skill in the Confederacy (and it was the flower of the genius of the country) during a period of two years. Lee, Beauregard, and Ripley in succession have exhausted their professional efforts to make it impregnable. Every thing that the most improved modern artillery and unlimited resources of labor can do has been done to make the passage of a fleet impossible. And it is impregnable. Sebastopol was as nothing to it. Our fleet got but to the entrance of the harbor. It never got within it. Had the iron-clads succeeded in passing the obstructions, they would still have found those miles of batteries to run. They would have entered an Inferno which, like the portals of Dante's hell, might well bear the flaming legend: Who enters here leaves hope behind. Not a point at which they would not have found themselves. 'Mid upper, nether and surrounding fires. They pass out of th
andersville, tile Eighty-eighth Indiana lost one man captured by a squad of rebel cavalry. On the thirtieth, my brigade, in advance of the division, marched from Louisville on the road leading to Station No. 10, and camped three miles east of Sebastopol. From this point the command marched to Lumpkins, a station on the Augusta Railroad, where we bivouacked during the night. The next morning, December fourth, my brigade destroyed one and a quarter miles of railroad, after which we marched ithird, marched to Milledgeville, capital of the State. November twenty-fourth to twenty-seventh, marched to Davisboro Station, on the Macon and Savannah Railroad. November twenty-eighth, marched to Louisville. November thirtieth, marched to Sebastopol, on the Macon and Savannah Railroad. December first to third, marched to Lumpton Station, on the Savannah and Augusta Railroad. December fourth, part of the day the brigade was engaged destroying railroad; was rear-guard to the wagon-train,
ps were of no possible use to me beyond holding Fortress Monroe, and would have been of very great use if the surplus had been incorporated with the Army of the Potomac. The whole force sent forward had not joined me at the date of this letter; it was not until seven days later that Casey, Hooker, and Richardson reached the front line; they could not be brought up earlier. I have already shown the impossibility of attacking earlier or otherwise than we actually did. When in front of Sebastopol in 1855 I asked Gen. Martimprey, chief of staff of the French army in the Crimea, how he found that the cable worked which connected the Crimean with the European lines of telegraph. He said that it worked admirably from the Crimea to Paris, but very badly in the opposite direction; and by way of explanation related the following anecdote: He said that immediately after the failure of the assault of June, 1855, the emperor telegraphed Pelissier to renew the assault immediately. Pelissier
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.34 (search)
from a strictly military point of view, the term siege cannot properly be applied to the operations around Petersburg, for there was lacking what, according to Vauban, is the fist requisite in a siege — perfect investment. the same is true of Sebastopol. Address of Capt. W. Gordon McCabe (formerly Adjutant of Pegram's battalion of artillery, A. N. V.) before the Association of the Army of Northern Virginia, November 1, 1876. [published by request of the Association.] Comrades of the Army of Northern Virginia: I am here in obedience to your orders and give you a soldier's greeting. It has fallen to me, at your behest, to attempt the story of a defence more masterly in happy reaches of generalship than that of Sebastopol, and not less memorable than that of Zaragoza in a constancy which rose superior to accumulating disaster, and a stern valor ever reckoned highest by the enemy. It is a great task, nor do I take shame to myself that I am not equal to it, for, spe
plains of Agincourt; never Oliver Cromwell on the fields of Marston Moor and Naseby; never Sarsfield on the banks of the Boyne. The glories and honors of Sir Campbell are the glories of the British race, and the races of Great Britain and Ireland, from whom we are descended. But what gained Sir Colin Campbell the opportunity to achieve those glorious results in India? Remember that, and let us see what it was. On one of those bloody battles fought by the British before the fortress of Sebastopol, in the midst of the perils, the most perilous of all the battle-fields England ever encountered in Europe, in one of the bloody charges of the Russian cavalry, there was an officer—a man who felt and who possessed sufficient confidence in the troops he commanded, and in the authority of his own voice and example—received that charge not in the ordinary, commonplace, and accustomed manner, by forming his troops into a hollow square, and thus arresting the charge, but by forming into two di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McCormick, Richard Cunningham 1832- (search)
McCormick, Richard Cunningham 1832- Journalist; born in New York, May 23, 1832; received a classical education; was a war correspondent in the Crimea in 1854-55; served in the same capacity in the Civil War in 1862-63; was governor of Arizona in 1866-69; and represented that Territory in the United States House of Representatives in 1869-75. He was a delegate to the National Republican Conventions of 1872, 1876, and 1880; commissioner to the Centennial Exhibition in 1876; assistant Secretary of the Treasury in 1877-78: and commissioner-general of the United States to the Paris Exposition in 1878. He was made a commander of the Legion of Honor of France in the latter year. His publications include Visit to the camp before Sebastopol; Arizona: its resources, etc.; and he edited Reports of the United States commissioners to the Paris Exposition (6 volumes).
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